Vote with your Dollars

Check The #GrabYourWallet Site and Avoid Giving Your Money to Trump

This OTYCD entry originally posted in January 2017.

An excellent way to push back against the new administration is to avoid giving your money to Trump and his children.

Grab Your Wallet is a peerless resource. Created in October 2016, it tells you which Trump-entangled retail establishments to avoid, and others that you could choose instead.

https://grabyourwallet.org/Boycott%20These%20Companies.html

It also tells you, in detail, why an entity is on the list; why others have since been removed from the list; and why still others don’t sink low enough to require a place on the list.

Grab Your Wallet also keeps a second list of companies with less direct links to Trump–owners or board members who raised money for his campaign, companies that have advertised on The Apprentice, and the like–that you might wish to boycott, too.

It has notched some notable wins lately. In early February, Nordstrom, which had been on the Grab Your Wallet list, announced that it would stop carrying Ivanka Trump products. (Nordstrom stated that it was dropping the line due to poor sales, and did not acknowledge any direct effect from the boycott, but think–why were the sales poor? Surely the boycott had some effect?)

Nordstrom’s move has since shown how effective boycotting Trump products can be. Trump complained about Nordstrom’s treatment of Ivanka in a tweet; Trump press secretary Sean Spicer characterized the action as a “direct attack” on Trump; and senior advisor Kellyanne Conway flouted government ethics rules by blatantly telling Fox & Friends viewers to “go buy Ivanka’s stuff.” The Trump team’s reactions showed their disdain for the free market and yielded more evidence that that they do not understand, or do not care, why the government has ethics rules against profiting from holding high office.

Grab Your Wallet is well-curated and updated constantly. Please bookmark it, consult it, and share it.

 

Community Activism · Fighting Bigotry, Racism, Sexism, Homophobia, Transphobia... · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Read, Memorize, and Act on the Southern Poverty Law Center’s 10 Ways to Fight Hate

This OTYCD entry originally posted in August 2017.

Read, memorize, and act on the Southern Poverty Law Center’s piece, 10 Ways to Fight Hate.

Posted after the events of Charlottesville, the SPLC piece gives you ten things you can do to resist the cultural changes that neo-Nazis and white supremacists are trying to create with the passive, if not sometimes active, help of Trump and his administration.

The full list is:

Act

Join Forces

Support the Victims

Speak Up

Educate Yourself

Create an Alternative

Pressure Leaders

Stay Engaged

Teach Acceptance

Dig Deeper

 

The most important thing is to act–to do something, to not sit mute in the face of hate. The SPLC put “act” first on the list for a reason. Silence reads as compliance and even approval to those who want to advance hate and intolerance. You have to say or do something when it shows its face to you.

If you are white, it is double-super-extra-mega-important for you to act. People of color and minorities have been carrying the burden of pushing back for too long. It is on white people to wield their privilege like a weapon for dismantling this corrosive bullshit.

You cannot stand by and assume someone else will pick up the slack. It is on you to do something. It is always on you to do something. Always. 

Know also that the Nazis did not stop until they were stop. Remember appeasement? Think of how we remember Neville Chamberlain? Yeah, don’t be Neville Chamberlain. You lose now AND you lose later.

The only way you win when dealing with Nazis, fascists, and those who would carry their banners is to stop them right away. Give them no quarter and no comfort. Shut them down, just like the people of Boston shut down the so-called Free Speech Rally on August 19, when at least 20,000 anti-racist protestors showed up to find 20 neo-Nazis, fascists, and white supremacists.

Read the SPLC’s Ten Ways to Fight Hate: A Community Response Guide:

https://www.splcenter.org/20170814/ten-ways-fight-hate-community-response-guide

 

Donate to the SPLC:

https://donate.splcenter.org/sslpage.aspx?pid=463

 

Like its Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/SPLCenter

 

Follow the SPLC on Twitter:

@splcenter

Call Your State Legislators · Elections · Ethics · Stand Up for Norms · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Ask Your State Legislators to Pass a Bill Requiring Presidential Candidates to Release Their Tax Returns Or Else

This OTYCD entry originally posted in April 2017.

Have a look at this bill that Massachusetts State Senator Michael Barrett proposed that would require all presidential and vice presidential candidates to release five years’ worth of tax returns, and ask your own state legislators to pass a similar bill. 

When the feds are asleep at the wheel, we citizens have to turn to state and local government to step in and steer as best they can. Trump promised to release his tax returns when he was a presidential candidate, but has consistently refused to honor his pledge. Enter Massachusetts state senator Mike Barrett, who’s doing his best to make sure no one else can pull the same move without consequences.

In January he proposed Bill S.365, titled An Act Restoring Financial Transparency in Presidential Elections. If passed, it would require all presidential and vice presidential candidates to release five years’ worth of tax returns if they want to appear on the state’s ballot. Candidates who fail to comply lose the right to appear on the ballot; they could only compete as a write-in.

Brendan Berger, who handles communications for Barrett, says the state senator consulted constitutional law professor Laurence Tribe, on the bill, and reports that Tribe believes it will pass muster.

Could your state pass something similar?

First, check and make sure your state legislators aren’t already on the case. A handful of states, all heavily Democratic, are pursuing similar measures.

If your state legislators aren’t mulling a bill like this one yet, call or email them and ask them to consider it.

To find your state legislators, plug your address and zip code into this web site:

https://whoaremyrepresentatives.org

Once you have the two names you need, go to the web site for your state legislature and find the contact information for your state senator and state house rep.

Contacting your state house rep and state senator is different from contacting your federal-level reps. Calls and emails are equally effective, and you’re far more likely to get through to the actual elected official. It might be best to start with your state senator, seeing as Barrett is a state senator.

Sample email: Dear State Senator (Lastname), I am (Firstname Lastname), and I live in (town, zip code). I am emailing to ask if you would consider introducing a bill that would require all presidential and vice presidential candidates to release five years’ worth of tax returns in order to appear on our state’s ballot. Having a law like this in place would prevent future candidates from refusing to release their returns, as Trump has. I have (attached/included a link) to a Massachusetts bill now under consideration that is designed to address this issue. Thanks for considering my request. Sincerely, (Firstname Lastname).

 

Read the text of Massachusetts State Senator Mike Barrett’s bill:

https://malegislature.gov/Bills/190/S365/Senate/Bill/Text

 

Read Barrett’s statement about his bill, S.365, which explains it in plainer language:

http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Mass–law-can-compel-presidential-candidates-to-release-their-tax-returns—So-let-s-do-it—The-Barrett-Report–December–2016-.html?soid=1110058483636&aid=dXsAzV6_NRA

 

Read stories from Massachusetts newspapers on Barrett’s bill:

https://www.boston.com/news/politics/2016/12/15/this-massachusetts-bill-could-block-donald-trump-from-the-ballot-in-2020

http://lexington.wickedlocal.com/news/20161214/senator-mike-barret-d-lexington-wants-presidential-candidates-tax-returns-to-run-for-office-in-massachusetts

 

This Politico article contains references to efforts in Illinois and New Mexico to pass state bills that are similar to that of Barrett’s (scroll down a good bit):

http://www.politico.com/story/2017/02/state-legislators-trump-trolling-234919

 

Special thanks to Brendan Berger for answering OTYCD‘s questions about Mike Barrett’s bill via DM on Twitter. Please follow him: @brendanberger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Elections · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends · Vote with your Dollars · GOOD UPDATE!

GOOD UPDATE! Democrat Hala Ayala WON A Seat in Virginia’s State Legislature

This OTYCD entry originally posted in September 2017.

YES YES YES! Hala Ayala won her race for a seat in Virginia’s House of Delegates! She defeated Rich Anderson, a four-term Republican incumbent.

Read more here:

http://www.insidenova.com/news/politics/prince_william/ayala-wins-st-district-seat-defeating–term-incumbent/article_22e3019e-c434-11e7-bb85-b3efe305948f.html

Original text of this post follows.

Support Democrat Hala Ayala, who is running for a seat in Virginia’s House of Delegates on November 7, 2017.

In addition to spotlighting five Virginia state-level candidates chosen by Flippable for the upcoming race in November, we at OTYCD are also devoting posts to six candidates chosen by 314 Action whose races fall in 2017. 314 Action is an organization that boosts hopefuls who have STEM backgrounds.

Ayala worked her way up from a service job with no benefits to serving the Department of Homeland Security as a cybersecurity specialist. She is the founder and former president of the Prince William County chapter of the National Organization for Women. She helped organize Virginian efforts to appear at the Women’s March on Washington on January 21, 2017.

Ayala would expand Medicaid and defend Planned Parenthood. A former president of a local Parent-Teacher Organization, she supports universal pre-K, affordable college and university tuition, and efforts against bullying and discrimination. She would invest in public transportation and other infrastructure projects that could reduce traffic woes. She supports initiatives for paid family leave, paid sick leave, increasing the minimum wage, and ensuring equal pay for equal work.

 

See Ayala’s campaign website:

https://ayalafordelegate.com

 

See her Meet Hala page:

https://ayalafordelegate.com/about/

 

See her Issues page:

https://ayalafordelegate.com/on-the-issues/

 

Donate to Ayala’s campaign:

https://secure.actblue.com/donate/314action_ayala?refcode=314website

 

Like her on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/AyalaforDelegate/

 

Follow her on Twitter:

@HalaAyala

 

See her 314 Action page:

http://www.314action.org/hala-ayala

 

See her Crowdpac page:

https://www.crowdpac.com/campaigns/212305/hala-ayala

 

See her Ballotpedia page:

https://ballotpedia.org/Hala_Ayala

 

See 314 Action’s Endorsed Candidates page:

http://www.314action.org/endorsed-candidates/

 

Donate to 314 Action:

https://secure.actblue.com/contribute/page/314act?refcode=website&amounts=15,25,50,100,250,500,1000&amount=25&recurring=true

Health Care · Save These Tools · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Stand Up for Norms

Feel Less Alone: Join Gene Weingarten’s Weekly Chat at the Washington Post

Join Gene Weingarten’s weekly online chats every Tuesday at noon EST at the Washington Post.

It pains us to admit that Trump’s victory caused something good to happen, but here it is: Trump’s election convinced humor columnist Gene Weingarten to resume his weekly online Chatological Humor chats at the Washington Post website on Tuesdays.

To be fair, he bills these as mini-chats. He used to do glorious longer chats every week until he accepted a buy-out from the Washington Post, and reduced them to monthlies. The raw post-Trump trauma radiating from his band of regulars convinced him to resume chatting weekly, at least for a while.

He says he’ll chat about anything and he pretty much does, but many of the questions he tackles are, at their core, rooted in the sentiment, “Trump. WTF? WTFF? I just–I can’t believe this.” Weingarten gamely plays the dual role of the voice of sanity and the voice of levity.

Weingarten’s Tuesday chats will do you good. You’ll be (virtually) surrounded by bright, fine, funny people who didn’t vote for Trump, who have come to hear live wisdom and fart jokes from a brighter, finer, funnier person who didn’t vote for Trump. If your schedule allows you to join live at noon EST, make a plan of it. Otherwise, read the transcripts.

 

Bookmark the link to the main Gene Weingarten page on the Washington Post site, through which you can join the latest Chatological Humor:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/people/gene-weingarten/?utm_term=.ec9d1b3c726e

 

Here is a sample mini-chat update:

https://live.washingtonpost.com/gene-weingarten-20170321.html

 

Here is a sample full-length chat:

https://live.washingtonpost.com/chatological-humor-20170328.html

 

Here is a recent Below the Beltway humor column by Weingarten:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/magazine/what-happens-when-a-humor-columnist-discovers-a-lump-in-his-throat/2017/03/24/3d522194-0027-11e7-8f41-ea6ed597e4ca_story.html?utm_term=.f81f070d467b

 

Not that you needed proof that Weingarten can write, but here’s Pearls Before Breakfast, a Washington Post feature story that earned a Pulitzer Prize:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/magazine/pearls-before-breakfast-can-one-of-the-nations-great-musicians-cut-through-the-fog-of-a-dc-rush-hour-lets-find-out/2014/09/23/8a6d46da-4331-11e4-b47c-f5889e061e5f_story.html?utm_term=.c94af1c5c515

 

And if you haven’t subscribed to the Washington Post yet, how about you take care of that now?:

https://subscribe.washingtonpost.com/loginregistration/index.html#/register/group/default?destination=http:%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Fpb%2Fhomepage%2F

 

The caricature of Weingarten appears on his landing page.

Uncategorized

Learn Which 36 Governorships Are On the Ballot in 2018

Learn which 36 governorships are on the ballot in 2018.

In addition to hundreds of Congressional races, 2018 is a big year for governorships. No less than 36 of the 50 posts will be contested. As of January 1, 2018, 17 sitting governors intend to run and 17 others won’t run again or are term-limited out.

A total of 26 of those 36 governorships are held by Republicans, which creates a huge opportunity for Democratic pickups.

The situation also creates opportunities to break Republican trifectas and maybe create a few new Democratic trifectas.

A trifecta happens when one party controls the governorship and both chambers of a state’s legislature. If a majority of states muster trifectas, those states could call a Constitutional Convention and rewrite the basics of how our country is governed.

Maneuvering America toward a Constitutional Convention has been a long-term goal of some right-wing groups. Frustrating Republican trifectas should factor into your concerns as a voter and a citizen.

What follows is a list of the 36 governors’ races, and notes on whether the incumbent is running.

 

Alabama: Republican incumbent Kay Ivey is running. She was sworn in in April 2017 after the previous governor, Republican Robert Bentley, resigned following a scandal that could have ended in impeachment. Alabama has a Republican trifecta.

At least six Democratic candidates will run in the June 5 primary.

 

Alaska: Independent incumbent Bill Walker is running for his second term. He won in 2014 with 48.1 percent of the vote.

As of January 1, 2018, no Democrats had declared they would run in the August 21 primary.

 

Arizona: Republican incumbent Doug Doucey is running for a second term. He won in 2014 with 53.4 percent of the vote. Arizona has a Republican trifecta.

At least two Democrats will run in the August 28 primary.

 

Arkansas: Republican incumbent Asa Hutchinson is running for a second term. He won in 2014 with 55.4 percent of the vote. Arkansas has a Republican trifecta.

As of January 1, 2018, no Democrats had pledged to run in the May 22 primary.

 

California: Democratic incumbent Jerry Brown is term-limited out. California has a Democratic trifecta.

At least ten Democrats will run in the June 5 primary, including lieutenant governor Gavin Newsom and former Los Angeles mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.

 

Colorado: Democratic incumbent John Hickenlooper is term-limited out.

At least nine Democrats will run in the June 26 primary, including House Rep Jared Polis.

 

Connecticut: Democratic incumbent Dan Malloy has chosen not to run for a third term. Connecticut has a Democratic trifecta.

At least five Democrats will run in the August 14 primary.

 

Florida: Republican incumbent Rick Scott is term-limited out. Florida has a Republican trifecta.

At least seven Democrats will run in the August 28 primary.

 

Georgia: Republican incumbent Nathan Deal is term-limited out. Georgia has a Republican trifecta.

At least two Democrats, including Stacey Abrams, will appear in the May 22 primary.

 

Hawaii: Democratic incumbent David Ige will run for a second term. In 2014 he won with 49.5 percent of the vote; his nearest competitor got 37.1 percent. Hawaii has a Democratic trifecta.

At least two other Democrats will meet Ige in the August 11 primary.

 

Idaho: Republican incumbent Butch Otter chose not to run for a fourth term. Idaho has a Republican trifecta.

At least three Democrats will run in the May 15 primary.

 

Illinois: Republican incumbent Bruce Rauner will run for a second term. He won in 2014 with 50.3 percent of the vote, four points ahead of his Democratic rival.

At least seven Democrats will run in the March 20 primary, including Chris Kennedy and J. B. Pritzker.

 

Iowa: Republican incumbent Kim Reynolds will run for her first full term. She was sworn in in May 2017 when the sitting governor, Terry Branstad, became the U.S. ambassador to China. In 2014, running as lieutenant governor alongside Branstad, the two drew 59 percent of the vote to the Democrats’ 37.3 percent. Iowa has a Republican trifecta.

At least eight Democrats will run in the June 5 primary, including physician and former Iowa Democratic Party chairwoman Andrea “Andy” McGuire.

 

Kansas: Republican incumbent Sam Brownback is term-limited out. Kansas has a Republican trifecta.

At least seven Democrats will run in the August 7 primary.

 

Maine: Republican incumbent Paul LePage is term-limited out.

At least 13–yes, you read that right, 13–Democrats will run in the June 12 primary.

 

Maryland: Republican incumbent Larry Hogan is running for his second term. He won in 2014 with 51 percent of the vote; the Democrats got 47.2 percent.

At least nine Democrats, including former NAACP president and CEO Ben Jealous, will run in the June 26 primary.

 

Massachusetts: Republican incumbent Charlie Baker is running for his second term. In 2014, he won with 48.4 percent of the vote to the Democrats’ 46.5 percent. He might do better this time around; he has the highest popularity ratings of any sitting governor in America.

At least three Democrats, including Newton Mayor Setti Warren (no relation to Elizabeth Warren), will run in the September 18 primary.

 

Michigan: Republican incumbent Rick Snyder is term-limited out. Michigan has a Republican trifecta.

At least eight Democrats will run in the August 7 primary.

 

Minnesota: Democratic incumbent Mark Dayton declined to run for a third term. Minnesota has a Democratic trifecta.

At least six Democrats will run in the August 14 primary.

 

Nebraska: Republican incumbent Pete Ricketts is running for a second term. In 2014, he won with 57.2 percent of the vote to the Democrats’ 39.3 percent. Nebraska has a Republican trifecta.

As of January 1, 2018, no Democrats had signed up for the May 15 primary.

 

Nevada: Republican incumbent Brian Sandoval is term-limited out.

At least three Democrats will appear in the June 12 primary.

 

New Hampshire: Republican incumbent Chris Sununu will run for a second term. In 2016, he won with 48.8 percent of the vote; his Democratic competitor got 46.9 percent. The state has a Republican trifecta.

At least one Democrat, former Portsmouth mayor Steve Marchand, will run in the September 11 primary.

 

New Mexico: Republican incumbent Susana Martinez is term-limited out.

At least four Democrats will run in the June 5 primary.

 

New York: Democratic incumbent Andrew Cuomo will run for a third term. He won the 2014 election handily, getting 54.3 percent of the vote to the Republicans’ 40.3 percent.

As of January 1, 2018, no other Democrats had announced they would run in the September 11 primary.

 

Ohio: Republican incumbent John Kasich is term-limited out. Ohio has a Republican trifecta.

At least six Democrats will run in the May 8 primary, including Richard Cordray, former head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

 

Oklahoma: Republican incumbent Mary Fallin is term-limited out. Oklahoma has a Republican trifecta.

At least three Democrats will appear in the June 26 primary.

 

Oregon: Democratic incumbent Kate Brown will run for her first full term after being appointed in February 2015 and winning a special election in 2016. The previous governor, Democrat John Kitzhaber, resigned over an ethics scandal. In her 2016 race, she garnered 50.7 percent of the vote. Her nearest rival, the Republican, got 43.5 percent.

As of January 1, 2018, no other Democrats had agreed to appear in the May 15 primary.

 

Pennsylvania: Democratic incumbent Tom Wolf will run for his second term. He won his first decisively in 2014, getting 54.9 percent of the vote to the Republicans’ 45.1 percent.

As of January 1, 2018, no other Democrats had agreed to appear in the May 15 primary.

 

Rhode Island: As of January 1, 2018, Democratic incumbent Gina Raimondo had not yet decided if she’ll run for a second term. Rhode Island has a Democratic trifecta. In 2014, she pulled in 40.7 percent of the vote. Her nearest competitor, a Republican, got 36.2 percent.

If she runs, Raimondo will meet at least two other Democrats in the September 12 primary.

 

South Carolina: Republican incumbent Henry McMaster will run for his first full term after being appointed in 2017 when Nikki Haley left to serve as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. South Carolina has a Republican trifecta.

At least three Democrats have committed to the June 12 primary.

 

South Dakota: Republican incumbent Dennis Daugaard is term-limited out. South Dakota has a Republican trifecta.

At least one Democrat, state Senator Billie Sutton, has signed up for the June 5 primary.

 

Tennessee: Republican incumbent Bill Haslam is term-limited out. Tennessee has a Republican trifecta.

At least two Democrats will run in the August 2 primary.

 

Texas: Republican incumbent Greg Abbott will run for a second term. He won decisively in 2014, getting 59.3 percent of the vote to Democrat Wendy Davis’s 38.9 percent. Texas has a Republican trifecta.

A total of ten Democrats have committed to the March 6 primary.

 

Vermont: As of January 1, 2018, Republican incumbent Phillip Scott had not decided if he would run for a second term. In 2016, he received 52.9 percent of the vote to the Democrats’ 44.2 percent.

At least two Democrats will run in the August 14 primary.

 

Wisconsin: Republican incumbent Scott Walker will run for a third term. In 2014, he won 52.3 percent of the vote to the Democrats’ 46.6 percent. Wisconsin has a Republican trifecta.

Wow! At least 14 Democrats will face off in the August 14 primary.

 

Wyoming: Republican incumbent Matt Mead is term-limited out. Wyoming has a Republican trifecta.

At least one Democrat, former state Rep. Mary Throne, will appear in the August 21 primary.

 

Check out Ballotpedia’s page on the 2018 gubernatorial races:

https://ballotpedia.org/Gubernatorial_elections,_2018

 

Donate to Ballotpedia ($18 corresponds to the cost of writing a single article):

https://ballotpedia.org/Ballotpedia:Donate

 

Like Ballotpedia on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Ballotpedia?ref=br_tf

 

Follow Ballotpedia on Twitter:

@ballotpedia

 

Read a November 2016 Politico story on how Democrats hope to make pickups in gubernatorial races:

https://www.politico.com/story/2016/11/2018-governors-races-democrats-231815

 

Read a July 2017 New York magazine story on the same topic:

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2017/07/democrats-could-make-major-gains-in-governorships-in-2018.html

 

Call Your Members of Congress · Health Care

Call Your MoCs and Ask Them to Re-Authorize CHIP

This OTYCD entry originally posted in October 2017.

Call your MoCs and ask them to reauthorize the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which covers about nine million American kids.

Note: This information was originally part of a multi-purpose post published on September 29. We’ve reworked the post and reposted it as a separate, dedicated item so it can continue to circulate until CHIP is reauthorized. Apologies to subscribers, who will receive this as a ‘new’ post.

The latest deadline for the Senate to pass Trumpcare was September 30. That happens to be the same day that the CHIP program expired. Passed under the Clinton administration, the law provides for a program that delivers health coverage to American children in need.

Congress missed the deadline to re-up the 20-year-old law, meaning that funding will stop until the law is reauthorized. About nine million children could suffer disruptions in their health coverage or lose it entirely while waiting for Congress to act.

Here’s a sample script to use when calling your MoCs. As always, please check their websites and social media feeds before you call to see if they have said anything about the expiration of CHIP, and thank or shame them accordingly.

“Dear Senator/House Rep (Lastname), I am (Firstname Lastname, of town, zip code). I am asking you to do whatever you can to reauthorize CHIP, the 20-year-old program that provides health insurance to roughly nine million children. As you are probably aware, CHIP expired on September 30, cutting off funding for the program. Please reauthorize CHIP as soon as possible, and urge your colleagues to do so. Thank you.”

 

Read about CHIP and its importance:

https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2017/05/childrens-health-insurance-program-congress/526008/

http://www.ada.org/en/publications/ada-news/2017-archive/september/ada-aapd-urge-congress-to-reauthorize-chip

http://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/352863-governors-to-congress-stabilize-insurance-markets-reauthorize-chip