Uncategorized

Find Out Which Organizations Are Handling the Grab-and-Go Lunch Program at Your Local Public Schools, and Donate to Them

Re-running this post, which first appeared in March 2020, because COVID-19 lockdowns are still A Thing, and many of these programs have transitioned to a reduced summer schedule. For too many kids, programs such as these are their only reliable source of food when school is closed. 

 

Find out which organizations are handling the grab-and-go lunch program at your local public schools, and give them money.

 

The spread of Covid-19 is pitilessly exposing all the frayed links in our social safety net. One obstacle to shutting down public school systems is the fact that for a significant minority of children, their only reliable source of meals is their school cafeteria.

 

Grab-and-go lunch programs have sparked into being to serve this need by opening the school daily only to those who need meals.

 

We’re asking you to call around, find out which organizations are responsible for running the grab-and-go programs, and donate to their efforts.

 

If you have a kid in school, try emailing the school’s administrative office or asking about it on your school’s Facebook page.

 

Alternately, you could try calling your local school department, or your local food bank. They’ll probably know the answer or know who else you can check with.

 

Another thing to think about for the near future is supporting school-based feeding programs during the summer. We wrote about this before, and deadlines for food donations and for offering a specific venue as a feeding site start arriving this month and next.

 

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Uncategorized

Donate to the Black Journalists’ Therapy Relief Fund

Donate to the Black Journalists’ Therapy Fund, which provides financial assistance to black journalists for mental health support.

 

Journalists put up with a lot of bullshit in the course of their work. Black journalists endure exponentially more bullshit than most.

 

Reporting on the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and so many others can be traumatizing. It takes a toll.

 

And even now, newsrooms are overwhelmingly white. Fighting to tell stories that need to be told–spending workplace capital to argue the case to white editors, publishers, and owners who just don’t get it–that takes a toll, too.

 

Only famous journalists get paid well. Rank-and-filers get paid next to nothing. Even if the publication provides health insurance to its staffers, mental health coverage usually isn’t included, or comes with co-pays that makes therapy essentially unaffordable.

 

Enter the Black Journalists Therapy Relief Fund, a GoFundMe launched by Sonia Weiser on May 31, 2020.

 

It endeavors to provide up to $1,500 to each applicant to cover the costs of therapy.

 

As of late July 2020, the GoFundMe had raised more than $75,000 of its $100,000 goal.

 

It has also joined forces with the International Women’s Media Foundation (IWMF) to help underwrite mental health services for black journalists.

 

The GoFundMe will cover those who don’t qualify for assistance from IWMF.

 

 

Donate to the Black Journalists Therapy Relief Fund:

https://www.gofundme.com/f/black-journalists-therapy-relief-fund

 

 

Apply for financial assistance with mental health needs (assuming you qualify):

https://iwmf.submittable.com/submit/25d0d67f-9c98-4813-9259-7d80bca55195/joint-application-form-for-iwmf-u-s-journalism-emergency-fund-and-black-journali

 

 

Read more about the additional challenges black journalists face (some articles are behind a paywall):

 

https://www.theroot.com/black-journalists-and-covering-the-storm-that-never-pas-1843756825

 

https://www.latimes.com/world-nation/story/george-floyd-and-the-special-hell-reserved-for-black-journalists-covering-his-killing

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/media/the-terror-of-wearing-both-a-press-badge-and-black-skin-black-journalists-are-carrying-unique-burdens-right-now/2020/06/01/2266a258-a414-11ea-b473-04905b1af82b_story.html

 

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Uncategorized

Support the Dr. Lorna Breen Heroes’ Fund, Which Wants to Make It Easier for Medical Personnel to Seek Mental Health Services

Support the Dr. Lorna Breen Heroes’ Fund, which wants to make it easier for medical personnel to seek mental health services.

 

Dr. Lorna Breen was someone we couldn’t afford to lose.

 

By 2020, she had long since attained her dream job as the physician director of an emergency room in Manhattan.

 

Then COVID-19 hit the city.

 

Breen, who had no history of issues that might flag her as a suicide risk, found herself plunged into a nightmare. Victims of the virus swamped her hospital and kept swamping it. COVID-19 killed pitilessly and without relent. Some patients died before they could be transferred from an ambulance. Breen apparently likened the situation to Armageddon.

 

She caught the virus herself, but recovered after about ten days and returned to working 12-hour shifts.

 

Breen tended to COVID-19 sufferers valiantly at the expense of her own mental health. In late April 2020, she died by suicide. Her father told the New York Times, “She tried to do her job, and it killed her.”

 

Her family founded the Dr. Lorna Breen Heroes’ Foundation to address a serious cultural problem in the world of medicine: those who realize that aspects of their jobs might be causing them mental illness avoid seeking help for fear they’ll be sidelined or even fired.

 

Jennifer Feist, Breen’s sister, told the Today show: “I’m hearing so much from people who work in health care saying, ‘We always have to be brave. We always have to be strong. It’s not okay to say that you’re suffering. There’s a stigma.”

 

“I know my sister felt like she couldn’t sit down. She couldn’t stop working, and she certainly couldn’t tell anybody she was struggling. And that needs to be a conversation that changes. People need to be able to say they’re suffering and to take a break.”

 

We at OTYCD would add that the medical field needs to have plans in place to support and assist medical personnel who endure horrific situations such as an ER overwhelmed for weeks with people sick and dying from a disease that’s too damn new to have confirmed best treatment practices for yet.

 

To us, it seems natural and normal for folks to get depressed by the unspeakable situation that Dr. Breen faced.

 

Lots of people enter medicine with hopes of saving people from death and pain. It stands to reason that if those people are thrust into a situation where patient after patient dies despite their best efforts–and heck, die before they can even get them from the ambulance to the ER–that’s gonna mess with their heads.

 

Send them out there without enough personal protective equipment (PPE), oxygen tanks, ventilators, and other standard medical gear, and yeah, that’s a recipe for workplace trauma.

 

They should be able to get the help they need without fear of stigma or ending their careers.

 

 

See the website for the Dr. Lorna Breen Heroes’ Foundation:

https://www.drlornabreen.com

 

 

See its About page:

https://www.drlornabreen.com/about/

 

 

Like it on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/drbreenheroes/

 

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@drbreenheroes

 

 

Donate to the foundation:

https://cacf.iphiview.com/cacf/GIVENOW/AccountInformation/tabid/524/dispatch/accountselection_id$142946_hash$a6f599dd70ba1cc3dde510b0882a474eb4f74aa0/Default.aspx

 

 

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Uncategorized

Support Black-Owned Businesses

This OTYCD entry originally posted in July 2017.

 

Support black-owned businesses, both in your community and across the country.

 

The Support Black Owned (SBO) website offers a search engine that will help you find black-owned businesses in your state.  Black-owned businesses are almost always small businesses of the sort that comprise the fabric of a community.

 

When you need to buy goods and services, please check your state listing at SBO first and see if someone there can meet your needs.

 

 

See the SBO website (scroll to the bottom for the state links; they’re on the right):

https://www.supportblackowned.com

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Like the SBO Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/SupportBlackOwned

 

 

Follow SBO on Twitter:

@SupportBlackOwn

 

 

Connect with SBO on LinkedIn:

https://www.linkedin.com/company-beta/3283815/

 

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Community Activism · Elections · Postcard Campaigns · Uncategorized

Help Postcards to Swing States (Formerly Postcards to Wisconsin and Michigan)

Help Postcards to Swing States reach voters in ten critical states and remind them to cast a ballot this fall.

 

This story comes with backstory. The folks behind Postcards to Swing States started with Postcards to Wisconsin, an effort to Get Out the Vote (GOTV) in the April 2020 Wisconsin Democratic primary.

 

That wasn’t the end of it. Their initial plans for phase two were to target Wisconsin and Michigan Democratic voters with two million GOTV postcards, nudging them to come out in the fall for the November 3, 2020 election.

 

Well, the organizers’ ambitions expanded.

 

Postcards to Swing States aims to send 13 million GOTV postcards to:

 

Arizona

Florida

Iowa

Kansas

Michigan

North Carolina

Pennsylvania

…as well as Wisconsin.

 

The campaign actually targets ten states; two of them, Montana and Maine, have since been completed by volunteers.

 

Postcards to Swing States will provide you with pre-printed postcards. You provide the stamps and the labor. You’re also given a choice of one or two scripts to hand-write.

 

Postcards should be mailed around mid-October, but each order will contain specific dates for mailing.

 

The smallest order you can request is for 200 postcards.

 

As of July 2020, more than 25,000 volunteers have signed up to help.

 

If you can’t join the postcard army, you can finance it instead with a donation.

 

 

See the Postcards to Swing States website:

https://postcardstoswingstates.com

 

 

See the Postcards to Swing States FAQ, which includes the language of the A and B scripts:

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1xYifkfYLSNnsq9kyWKOobAhBi8-lsziLSE6oM29aUPc/edit

 

 

Donate to Postcards to Swing States:

https://secure.actblue.com/donate/postcardswimi

 

 

Like Postcards to Swing States on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/postcards2swingstates

 

 

Follow Postcards to Swing States on Twitter:

@Postcards2WI

 

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Uncategorized

Follow and Support Journalists Who Are on the Ground in Portland, Oregon, Covering the BLM Protests

Follow and support journalists who are on the ground in Portland, Oregon nightly, covering the Black Lives Matter protests.

 

This is one of many posts we are devoting to the summer 2020 Black Lives Matter protests in Portland. We thought about doing it as one huge mega-post, but realized it’s easier to digest if we break everything out into a series.

 

We realize in doing things this way, we run the risk that stories in the queue might be overtaken by events. We’re accepting that risk.

 

As of late July, Trump dispatched federal forces to Portland, Oregon, insisting that it’s out of control. (Spoiler alert: The people coming out are just protesting, aka exercising their First Amendment rights. Some are spraying graffiti on federal buildings.)

 

The arrival of outside forces only spurred still more Portlandians and Oregonians from surrounding areas to join the nightly protests, which have continued for more than 50 days–pretty much since the earliest public actions to decry the death of George Floyd.

 

While well-known newspapers and journalistic outlets have periodically covered the Portland protests, a phalanx of independent journalists have done so as well, putting themselves at risk to witness the events and turn them into news stories.

 

Full credit to Erin Ross, who tweets as @ErinEARoss, for inspiring this post.

 

She did a long thread on July 23, 2020, spotlighting and amplifying the work of those who have shown up, night after night, to cover and write about what’s happening.

 

Ross started the thread with a link to a Google Doc that lists many of those journalists, along with information on how to give them money.

 

Here’s the direct link to that Google doc:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/u/1/d/e/2PACX-1vSus2TGVTY9xek0ySPzLEiSUbPc8Z7vvWA5w6mInVgMfrTCrWmncvzAqScbc-39KZm8wVUVtNjhS5vR/pubhtml?gid=1864571786&single=true

 

Ross also devoted individual posts in the thread to specific journalists–some with local publications, some not. We’re going to highlight a few by giving their Twitter handles below, but again, if you want a more complete list of journalists that includes handles for giving them money, reference the Google Doc.

 

Alex Zielinski, who’s with the Portland Mercury:

@alex_zee

 

 

Sergio Olmos, who has freelanced for several Portland outlets:

@MrOlmos

 

 

Tuck Woodstock, who has freelanced for the Washington Post and NPR:

@tuckwoodstock

 

 

Cory Elia, a managing editor at Village Portland:

@TheRealCoryElia

 

 

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Uncategorized

TODAY is the FEC End-of-month Campaign Donation Deadline. Please Give to Your Favorite Presidential, Senate, and House Candidates Before Midnight

Important! Please donate to your favorite Presidential, House, and Senate candidates before midnight on Friday, July 31, 2020. Your money is extra-magical today.

 

Quarterly donation hauls matter to candidates–not just Presidential candidates, but House and Senate candidates, too. Big donors look at the quarterly numbers and weigh them carefully when considering which candidates to support with their own dollars.

 

But! As we get closer to the fall 2020 elections, monthly campaign donation totals take on greater importance.

 

If you need to budget strategically, it’s best to aim to give toward the end of the fiscal quarters. But if you can give something today–and it doesn’t have to be a crap-ton of money, anything helps–we at OTYCD urge you to do so.

 

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Uncategorized

Feed the Protesters in Portland, Oregon with the help of Kremlin Annex and Eleven Films

Feed the protesters in Portland, Oregon by donating to an effort run by the Kremlin Annex and the folks at Eleven Films.

 

This is one of several posts that references the summer 2020 Black Lives Matter protests in Portland. We’re doing these as a series because there’s a lot of useful information to distribute, and we don’t want to risk burying any one thing in a huge omnipost.

 

Yes, this is the second post that points to organizations that are feeding Portland protesters. We feel both are worthy and deserving of your attention.

 

As of late July, Trump has dispatched federal forces to the area, insisting that it’s out of control. (Spoiler alert: They’re just protesting, aka exercising their First Amendment rights. Some are spraying graffiti on federal buildings.)

 

We’ve written about the Kremlin Annex folks before. They’re good people and they deserve your support. They also had some hairy adventures of their own recently, what with Trump’s goons pulling their nonsense in and around Lafayette Square, where Kremlin Annex protesters have dutifully denounced the president on the regular since July 2018.

 

Eleven Films launched in Portland, Oregon in 2018 and has created several notable and widely seen anti-Trump videos.

 

The two have teamed up to deliver “meals and other resources” to the Black Lives Matter protesters on the ground in Portland. As of late July 2020, they had persisted for more than 50 nights.

 

Donate to the meals and resources effort:

https://secure.actblue.com/donate/portlandsupport?amount=20.20

 

 

Also see the Kremlin Annex website:

https://www.kremlinannex.org

 

 

Follow the Kremlin Annex on Twitter:

@KremlinAnnex

 

 

Like Kremlin Annex on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/KremlinAnnex

 

 

See the Eleven Films website:

https://www.eleven-films.com

 

 

See the Eleven Films About page:

https://www.eleven-films.com/copy-of-home

 

 

Like Eleven Films on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/elevenfilms/

 

 

Follow Eleven Films on Twitter:

@Eleven_Films

 

 

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Uncategorized

Support Riot Ribs, a Portland, Oregon Volunteer Effort That Feeds Local Protesters

Support Riot Ribs, a Portland, Oregon volunteer effort that’s been feeding locals for free during the Summer 2020 Black Lives Matter protests.

 

Riot Ribs sparked into being on July 4, 2020. The all-volunteer pop-up barbecue has fed Portland protesters around the clock ever since.

 

Riot Ribs has been harassed by the cops and similar forces fairly often. (Big shock there, we know.) It’s also earned the full-throated support of Earl Blumenauer, an Oregon member of the U.S. House of Representatives.

 

Feeding people as much as they need, 24/7, means Riot Ribs is always seeking donations.

 

 

Donate to Riot Ribs via its Cash App handle:

$riotribs

 

 

Follow Riot Ribs on Twitter to learn what it’s doing and what goods and groceries it needs most urgently:

@riotribs

 

 

Alternately, you can check this Google Doc which tracks Riot Ribs’s ever-changing needs:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1iIwcJ0XlUftxrOgZK-7zJiADLvQRy88sMCtDRLc-QEg/edit#gid=1537633281

 

 

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Uncategorized

Support the Wall of Vets, a New Group That Arose from the Black Lives Matter Protests in Portland, Oregon

Support the Wall of Vets, a new group that arose from the ongoing Black Lives Matter protests in Portland, Oregon.

 

This is one of many posts we are devoting to the summer 2020 Black Lives Matter protests in Portland. We thought about doing it as one huge mega-post, but concluded it’s easier to digest if we break everything out into a series.

 

We realize in doing things this way, we run the risk that stories in the queue might be overtaken by events. We’re accepting that risk.

 

As of late July, Trump dispatched federal forces to the area, insisting that it’s out of control. (Spoiler alert: The people coming out are just protesting, aka exercising their First Amendment rights. Some are spraying graffiti on federal buildings.)

 

The arrival of outside forces only spurred still more Portlandians and Oregonians from surrounding areas to join the nightly Black Lives Matter protests, which have continued for more than 50 days–pretty much since the earliest public actions to decry the death of George Floyd.

 

The first “Wall of” group to wink into life in Portland was Wall of Moms, which is exactly what you think it is–a wall of Moms, linking arms and staring down the forces threatening to tear-gas and generally break up the protests.

 

Chris David pretty much willed Wall of Vets into being. David, a 53-year-old Navy veteran whose attempt to speak with federal forces ended with them attacking him, called for his colleagues to form up and protect the protests.

 

They did.

 

The Portland, Oregon Wall of Vets made its formal debut on the night of July 24, 2020.

 

David asked veterans to wear white shirts, and asked their allies to wear blue shirts with white armbands.

 

Things are still pretty liquid as of late July 2020. Wall of Vets doesn’t seem to have a website yet. We will update this page as more information comes in.

 

 

The #WallofVets hashtag lets you keep up on the various groups’ activities, as do these Twitter handles:

@VetsWall

@WallofVetsUSA

@WallofVetsP

 

 

For now, the Wall of Vets regional and local branches are most active on Twitter. Handles for known Wall of Vets groups follow.

 

 

First, here’s the Twitter handle for the Portland, Oregon branch of Wall of Vets:

@PdxVets

 

The Los Angeles branch’s handle does not state its location:

@wallofvets

 

San Francisco, California:

@WallofVetsSF

 

Washington, D.C.:

@wallofvetsdc

 

Las Vegas, Nevada:

@VetsWallVegas

 

Chicago, Illinois:

@VetsWallof

 

Seattle, Washington:

@VetsSea

 

New Jersey (apparently state-wide):

@vetswallnj

 

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