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Join Run For Something, And, You Know, Run For Something

This OTYCD post originally appeared in November 2017.

 

Support Run for Something, an organization that recruits people who are under the age of 35 to run for elected office.

 

Look at Congress and an inescapable fact jumps out at you. Most of the members–the good ones and the bad ones–are on the old side. Some are downright elderly. To be fair, age is not, in and of itself, a barrier to holding elected office, nor should it be. But history shows that Congressfolks are all too happy to coast on their momentum as incumbents long after they’ve lost their drive to effectively serve their constituents.

 

Run For Something launched on Inauguration Day 2017. It’s one of many progressive organization that sprung up in the wake of the November 2016 election. Its purpose is to recruit young talent–people aged 35 and younger–to run for elected office as state legislators, mayors, city councilors, and the like. It is dedicated to helping more young people get on the ballot generally, and it hopes to build a progressive farm team of left-leaning political talent.

 

The organization will talk to everyone who fits the profile and expresses interest. It will liaise with similar organizations, such as EMILY’s List, She Should Run, Emerge, the Latino Victory Project, and others. In select cases, it will furnish money and staff.

 

Since we wrote and queued this post, Run For Something proved itself in spectacular fashion on November 8, 2017. It ran 72 candidates in 14 states for state and local races across the country, and 32 of those candidates won. (That number might rise to 34 once recounts in two Virginia House of Delegates races are completed.)

 

Those neophyte candidates backed by Run For Something notched a success rate of more than 40 percent, when 10 percent is far more typical.

 

Its winners included Danica Roem, the transgender woman who defeated a longterm incumbent and an avowed homophobe for a Virginia legislature, and Chris Hurst, a former journalist whose journalist girlfriend was killed live, on-air, by a deranged, armed man. He ran for a Virginia state seat on a gun safety platform and beat a three-time incumbent who was backed by the NRA.

 

Run For Something also supported Ashley Bennett, who got angry when a representative of hers in Atlantic City, N.J., mocked attendees of the Women’s March by wondering if the protest would end in time for them to come home and cook dinner. She ran for his Atlantic County board seat and wrested it away from him.

 

Run For Something is doing powerful work at the most granular level of government–school committees, planning boards, and the like–spotting young, promising talents and building a strong, progressive farm team from which tomorrow’s political stars will come. It deserves your support.

 

Visit the Run For Something webpage:

Run For Something

 

Learn about the current slate of Run For Something candidates:

https://www.runforsomething.net/candidates

 

Donate to Run For Something:

https://secure.actblue.com/contribute/page/rfs?refcode=nav

 

Follow Run For Something on Twitter:

@runforsomething

 

Like it on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/runforsomethingpac

 

Read stories about Run For Something and its November 2017 success:

http://time.com/4974562/amanda-litman-run-for-something/

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/page/ct-perspec-page-donald-trump-virginia-northam-danica-roem-gillespie-1113-20171110-story.html

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/11/9/16625966/run-for-something-progressives-local-election-virginia

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

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Learn Which Three States Prevent Felons Who Have Fulfilled Their Sentences from Voting, And Learn How Other States Handle Felons and Voting Rights

This post originally appeared on OTYCD in April 2019.

 

Learn which three states prevent felons who have fulfilled their sentences from voting, and learn how other states handle felons and voting rights.

 

Florida made headlines in November 2018 when about 65 percent of voters who turned out supported Amendment 4, which restored voting rights to felons who have completed their sentences.

 

Amendment 4 could re-enfranchise more than one million Florida voters, many of them black. Naturally, the GOP-controlled state legislature is trying to get around the implications of the new law by attempting what amounts to an unconstitutional poll tax. (Fortunately, Andrew Gillum is on the case.)

 

Three other states are as restrictive as Florida once was with its felons. They are:

 

Iowa

 

Kentucky

 

Virginia

 

We at OTYCD are not aware of any Amendment 4-style efforts in those states to change their laws, but if we learn of any, we will post them here and probably give them separate posts as well.

 

 

In 19 states, prisoners, parolees, and people on probation cannot vote, but everyone else can.

Those 19 states are:

 

Alaska

 

New Jersey

 

West Virginia

 

North Carolina

 

South Carolina

 

Georgia

 

Wisconsin

 

Minnesota

 

South Dakota

 

Nebraska

 

Missouri

 

Kansas

 

Arkansas

 

Oklahoma

 

Louisiana

 

Texas

 

New Mexico

 

Idaho

 

Washington

 

Felons who live in these states could benefit from a public awareness campaign that lets them know that if they have completed their sentences, they are eligible to vote.

 

 

Four states bar prisoners and parolees from voting, but allow those on probation to vote. They are:

 

California

 

New York

 

Colorado

 

Connecticut

 

Again, a public awareness-raising campaign would be useful here.

 

 

Fourteen other states, plus the District of Columbia, only stop people in prison from voting. But, again, ex-prisoners, parolees, and folks on probation may not be aware that they’re eligible to vote. This group includes:

 

Rhode Island

 

New Hampshire

 

Massachusetts

 

Pennsylvania

 

Maryland

 

Ohio

 

Michigan

 

Indiana

 

Illinois

 

North Dakota

 

Montana

 

Utah

 

Oregon

 

The District of Columbia

 

Just two states never take away their residents’ right to vote, even if they’re in prison: Vermont and Maine.

 

Getting as many people out to vote–both in 2019 election and the 2020 election–is crucial. Please know your rights and help others know their rights.

 

See the ACLU’s Felony Disenfranchisement Laws map:

https://www.aclu.org/issues/voting-rights/voter-restoration/felony-disenfranchisement-laws-map

 

See our past post about the ACLU, which includes links to its main page and a donation page:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2018/12/08/support-the-american-civil-liberties-union-aclu/

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

See the OTYCD 2019 To-Do List, which stresses helping register people to vote:

https://onethingyoucando.com/your-2019-to-do-list/

 

Support Andrew Gillum’s org, Bring It Home Florida, which helps Floridians register to vote:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2019/03/31/help-andrew-gillum-register-floridians-to-vote-in-time-for-the-2020-presidential-race/

 

See an April 2018 piece from the New York Times on states’ laws regarding felons and voting rights:

 

Uncategorized

Support No NRA Money, Which Aims to Make the NRA Radioactive In Our Culture

This OTYCD post originally appeared in August 2018.

 

Support No NRA Money, an organization that aims to make the National Rifle Association (NRA) radioactive in American culture.

 

If you’re reading this blog, you are beyond sick of Republican resistance to passing laws that will actually do something to curtail mass shootings. The NRA has done the most to aggressively smear, cloud over, and distract from what we all know is true–the root cause of mass shootings is guns, and how easy it is to get guns.

 

Every other country in the world has sick, entitled, anger-prone people. Most countries have access to the same video games, movies, books, music, and pop culture that Americans do. All countries have less-than-ideal parents among their citizens. But other countries don’t have anywhere near the number of mass shootings we do, and the only thing they have that we don’t is common-sense gun laws that work.

 

Fed up with the deadly stranglehold that the NRA has on American federal and state legislatures, No NRA Money is doing its damnedest to change the culture.

 

Just as Mothers Against Drunk Driving forced a cultural change that made drunk driving taboo rather than a small error, No NRA Money is pursuing a cultural change of its own–one that would make the NRA persona non grata.

 

It encourages candidates for office to pledge to refuse campaign donations from the NRA., and it encourages voters to pledge to vote against any candidate that accepts NRA money. As of late May 2018, more than 200 politicians and candidates for office had signed the No NRA Money pledge.

 

Its website also points visitors to a February 2018 Washington Post article that reveals which Congresspeople have accepted money from the NRA:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/graphics/national/nra-donations/?utm_term=.3e139de35166

 

 

It also links to numbers on donations to candidates who support “gun rights” (as opposed to gun control):

https://www.opensecrets.org/industries/summary.php?ind=Q13&cycle=2016&recipdetail=A&sortorder=U

 

 

Please support the work of No NRA Money and consider taking its voter pledge, which you can find here:

https://www.nonramoney.org/voter-pledge

 

 

Also see which politicians and candidates have taken the No NRA Money pledge:

https://www.nonramoney.org/list

 

 

See the No NRA Money homepage:

https://www.nonramoney.org

 

 

Like its Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/noNRAmoney/

 

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@noNRAmoney

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

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Captain Awkward Is the Half-Assed Activist on Her Patreon Page, and Is, Unsurprisingly, Awesome

This post originally appeared on OTYCD in May 2019.

 

Captain Awkward is the Half-Assed Activist on her Patreon page, and is, unsurprisingly, awesome. You should read it and become a monthly donor. 

 

So! A while back we at One Thing You Can Do devoted a blog post to Captain Awkward because she has a lot of good advice that applies to dealing with trolls and twerps without losing your shit–skills that apply to dealing with politically-motivated trolls and twerps.

 

You can see that post here:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2018/11/13/embrace-the-awkward-learn-to-handle-all-sorts-of-unreasonable-people/

 

Since then she’s added a Patreon and added a feature to her Patreon page: The Half-Assed Activist. It launched in January 2019 and it specifically tackles issues around political engagement, mental health, and mental health.

 

It’s exclusive to her Patreon, so you need to go there to see it.

 

You should be a Captain Awkward Patreon anyway (Disclaimer: Sarah Jane gives her $1 per month). But! The material she’s written for The Half-Assed Activist makes it even more of a bargain.*

 

The posts are infrequent–as of May 2019, there have been two–but they’re worth your time. Her April post, We Have Always Lived In Presidential Primary Season: A Half-Assed Activist Post About Getting Through This Shitshow Without Perpetuating Or Tolerating Bad Behavior And Keeping Some Tiny Spark Of Hope Alive, expertly brings the fire and merits a bookmark, so you can return to it and stoke yourself to go out there and do what needs doing.

 

 

Here’s the Patreon post in which CA introduces The Half-Assed Activist:

https://www.patreon.com/posts/new-feature-half-23921449

 

 

Here’s the link to We Have Always Lived In Presidential Primary Season: A Half-Assed Activist Post About Getting Through This Shitshow Without Perpetuating Or Tolerating Bad Behavior And Keeping Some Tiny Spark Of Hope Alive:

https://www.patreon.com/posts/we-have-always-26242073

 

 

Visit the Captain Awkward site:

https://captainawkward.com

 

 

Follow Captain Awkward on Twitter:

@CAwkward

 

 

Donate to Captain Awkward:

Support/Donate

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

*Captain Awkward generously gives hat-tips to One Thing You Can Do on her Patreon page. We’re delighted with hearing nice words spoken about us by someone we’ve all looked up to forever, but you should know–we didn’t solicit those comments. No logrolling here, we promise. And if her posts for The Half-Assed Activist sucked, we wouldn’t write about them. But they don’t, so we are.

 

Uncategorized

Support Spread the Vote, Which Helps Citizens Obtain IDs

This OTYCD entry originally posted in July 2017.

 

Support Spread the Vote, an organization that helps citizens access the ballot by obtaining IDs that their states require.

 

Republicans have noticed that they are more likely to win when fewer voters turn out. For this reason, they have embraced anti-democratic (small d) moves such as placing restrictions and qualifications on access to the ballot. Requiring prospective voters to present specific forms of identification is a favorite of theirs.

 

Voter ID laws suck, and they constitute the modern version of a poll tax. It hits the poor, the working class, the elderly, the young, and minorities particularly hard.

 

Some lack the documents they need to obtain ID, and cannot muster the money needed to hunt down those documents. Some can’t get the time off work to stand in line at City Hall or the DMV to straighten things out. Some are college students, whose college IDs are not generally accepted, and who receive conflicting information about where they can vote (home or on campus).

 

Enter Spread the Vote. Its mission is to help people get the documents they need to access the ballot. According to its numbers, 21 million people lack a government-issued photo ID, and 31 states require some form of ID to vote.

 

By helping Spread the Vote, you help expand the pool of eligible voters and defeat bullshit obstacles thrown up by Republicans who find it easier to frustrate citizens rather than develop ideas and policies that people would want to vote for.

 

Spread the Vote is and has conducted state-specific projects in Virginia and Georgia, but its scope is nation-wide. Please encourage their good work in whatever manner you can.

 

 

See Spread the Vote’s webpage:

https://www.spreadthevote.org

 

 

Ask for its help with obtaining an ID so you can vote:

https://www.spreadthevote.org/vote/

 

 

Volunteer for Spread the Vote:

https://www.spreadthevote.org/volunteer/

 

 

Like it on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/SpreadTheVoteUS

 

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@SpreadTheVoteUS

 

 

Donate to Spread the Vote:

https://secure.squarespace.com/commerce/donate?donatePageId=58727f25f7e0ab8a674b88bb

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

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See Political Charge’s Landing Page for GOP Senate Seats to Flip in 2020

This post originally appeared on OTYCD in June 2019.

 

See Political Charge’s landing page for GOP Senate seats to flip in 2020.

 

We at OTYCD have an underbuilt but live page on all the Senate races of 2020. Yeah, yeah, we need to fill it in more, you’re right.

 

Political Charge, a smart and powerful blog we’ve plugged any number of times, has cut to the chase with a post about GOP Senate seats that are vulnerable to flipping in 2020.

 

 

See it here:

Here are the GOP Senate Seats to Flip in 2020

 

 

And while you’re at it, check out its post about Senate Democratic seats to protect in 2020:

Here are the Democratic Senate Seats To Protect in 2020

 

 

See the Political Charge blog (the subscription button is at the lower right, at the bottom of the page):

https://politicalcharge.org

 

 

Follow Tokyo Sand, author of Political Charge, on Twitter:

@DHStokyo

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

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Support Americans Who Need Late-term Abortions

This post originally appeared on OTYCD in March 2018.

 

Support Americans who need late-term abortions.

 

No one gets an abortion after 20 weeks on a lark. You get an abortion after 20 weeks if you were raped and couldn’t get help earlier, or the baby is dead, or will die soon, or the pregnancy will kill you or end your fertility if you try to carry to term.

 

Obtaining an abortion after 20 weeks is an exceptionally expensive ordeal. Only a handful of doctors in the United States accept patients who need late-term abortions.

 

Only a handful of doctors do this work because of constant harassment from both pro-lifers and legislatures, which takes a toll on even the most thick-skinned and stiff-spined. Also, pretty much every other form of medicine is easier and better-paid than specializing in late-term abortions.

 

Read the June 2016 Jezebel story Interview With a Woman Who Recently Had an Abortion at 32 Weeks, by Jia Tolentino. Warning: It’s graphic, emotionally wrenching, and utterly unforgettable. You’ll need time to decompress afterward. There’s also no reason to think anything has changed for people in this situation since the story was published.

https://jezebel.com/interview-with-a-woman-who-recently-had-an-abortion-at-1781972395

 

 

Once you’ve done that, consider donating to the George Tiller Memorial Abortion Fund, which helps people who need late-term abortions but don’t have the money to cover the procedure and associated costs.

https://org2.salsalabs.com/o/6713/donate_page/tillerfund?okay=true

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!