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Show Some Love to Snopes.com, the First Fact-Checking Site on the Web (Updated March 13, 2018)

Update, March 13, 2018: David Mikkelson posted an update to the Snopes GoFundMe page last night. Fortunately, Snopes has had success in court to date. They recovered the advertising revenue that had been withheld, they were able to switch to a new hosting service and reassert control of their future ad revenue, and suits against Mikkelson were dismissed last month.

 

In response to questions about how to show support for Snopes going forward, Mikkelson raised the cap on the GoFundMe to $2 million. Legal fees have eaten the funds raised previously, and while things have gone well, they’re not done with the court system just yet. If you can help Snopes, please do.

 

Original text of our post follows:

 

We wrote and queued this post before word broke of Snopes.com’s troubles and its GoFundMe campaign. We are moving up the posting date for this piece and including a link to the fundraiser:

https://www.gofundme.com/savesnopes

 

As we write this update, the campaign has met its $500,000 goal but is still accepting donations. If you haven’t given, please do.

 

Let’s hear it for Snopes.com, the first, and still the most fascinating, fact-checking, myth-busting, rumor-stomping site on the web.

 

Snopes dates back to 1994, which is paleozoic by Internet standards. It evolved over time from being the work of a few people to the work of an entire team of researchers and writers who strive to be transparent and accurate, following the evidence wherever it leads.

 

We at OTYCD believe that the country passed a dark threshold when rabid right-wingers started claiming that Snopes had a liberal bias, and other such ridiculous things. In retrospect, it seems like a portent of the rise of Trumpism. But we digress.

 

Snopes, which is named after a family of characters who pop up in William Faulkner novels, is as incisive as it is entertaining, and you should visit it on the regular if you don’t already. It can save you from retweeting or posting information that’s more complex than the memes make it out to be, or just plain wrong, no matter where it comes from.

 

 

See the Snopes.com site:

http://www.snopes.com

 

 

Read the Snopes ‘About’ page:

http://www.snopes.com/about-snopes/

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Read the Snopes FAQ page:

http://www.snopes.com/frequently-asked-questions/

 

 

Like it on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/snopes

 

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@snopes