Community Activism · Fighting Bigotry, Racism, Sexism, Homophobia, Transphobia...

Help Life After Hate Help People Who Leave the Violent Far-Right

Help Life After Hate help people who leave violent far-right extremist groups.

Founded in 2011, the Chicago nonprofit directly helps people who want to deradicalize and leave their old ways behind through its EXITUSA program.

It also runs the Against Violent Extremism (AVE) network, a squad of former violent extremists and survivors who combat the groups’ propaganda and help steer vulnerable youths away from them.

Note: Since we wrote the original text of this post, Samantha Bee devoted an August 2017 episode of her show to Life After Hate. It also launched a crowdfunding campaign to replace the $400,000 grant that Obama promised, but which Trump took away. Links to stories about the rescinded grant, the crowdfunding campaign, and the Samantha Bee episode have been included below.

 

Visit the Life After Hate website:

https://www.lifeafterhate.org

 

Read a Guardian story about one of its leaders, Tony McAleer, who once belonged to the White Aryan Resistance:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/apr/04/life-after-hate-groups-neo-fascism-racism

 

Like its Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/lifeafterhate

 

Follow Life After Hate on Twitter:

@lifeafterhate

 

Donate to Life After Hate:

https://www.lifeafterhate.org/donate

 

See the page for the crowdfunding campaign started after the Trump administration refused to fulfill the $400,000 grant promised under Obama. As of October 14, 2017, it had raised more than $460,000 and was still accepting donations:

https://publicgood.com/org/life-after-hate-inc/campaign/help-life-after-hate-fight-on

 

Read stories about the episode that Samantha Bee did on Life After Hate following the Neo-Nazi rally in Charlottesville:

Sam Bee Looks to Aid Reformed Neo-Nazi Group Life After Hate in Wake of Charlottesville

http://time.com/money/4904718/samantha-bee-is-helping-raise-money-for-a-group-that-rehabs-white-supremacists-after-trump-cut-its-funding/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends · Vote with your Dollars

Read Who Thought This Was a Good Idea? by Obama Alum Alyssa Mastromonaco

Read Who Thought This Was a Good Idea? And Other Questions You Should Have Answers to When You Work in the White House, a refreshingly open and honest book by Alyssa Mastromonaco, alumna of the Obama administration. 

Mastromonaco served as the White House deputy chief of staff for operations and assistant to President Barack Obama from 2011 to 2014.

Her book is a riveting account of what it’s like to work in high-profile political jobs and it’s a breezy read, too. She salts it with useful tips (if you save your bosses money, make sure to tell them; never be a jerk; everyone is replaceable) but its greater value is in showing someone facing challenges and overcoming them.

Mastromonaco’s book, like Al Franken’s book, is one that you need to read right now. She never uses the phrase ‘impostor syndrome’, as far as I can remember, but her approach, her openness, and her willingness to talk about things others would just find too embarrassing, such as how she wrestled with episodes of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) on the road, make it a gem.

Mastromonaco is like the senior executive sitting down nervous interns or entry-level staffers on their first day and telling them, “You can do this. I did it, and here’s how.” If you are interested in running for office or helping someone run, it will give you confidence that you can do it.

Note also: Her Twitter bio says she has a new podcast coming soon. We suspect it’ll launch with Crooked Media, given that Dan Pfeiffer, Jon Favreau, and Tommy Vietor are peripheral characters in her book. We’ll update this page accordingly when the time comes.

 

Buy Mastromonaco’s book at these independent bookstores:

http://www.strandbooks.com/index.cfm

http://www.powells.com

 

Follow Mastromonaco on Twitter:

@AlyssaMastro44

Community Activism · Health Care

Support the National Alliance on Mental Illness

Support the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), which advocates for greater understanding of mental illnesses and helps afflicted Americans improve their lives.

 

Founded in 1979 and based in Arlington, Virginia, the grassroots organization fights the stigma attached to mental illnesses and advocates for better treatment options. It also connects sufferers, their families and their support networks with resources to demystify and treat mental illness.

 

Its topics of concern include anxiety disorders, schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), eating disorders, and more, as well as related conditions, such as sleep disorders, psychosis, dual diagnoses, and suicide.

 

 

See the NAMI website:

https://www.nami.org

 

 

See its Find Support page:

https://www.nami.org/Find-Support

 

 

See its Learn More page:

https://www.nami.org/Learn-More

 

 

Call the NAMI Helpline, which is staffed between 10 am to 6 pm EST, Monday through Friday:

800.950.NAMI

 

You can also text “NAMI” to 74141.

 

 

Donate to NAMI:

https://ifundraise.nami.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=donate.event&eventID=503&referrer=WEBDG&utm_source=HomepageButton&utm_medium=website&utm_campaign=DonationTracking

 

 

Like its Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/NAMI

 

 

 

Community Activism · Ethics · Health Care · Separation of Church and State · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms

Help Expose Fake Abortion Clinics

Help expose fake abortion clinics–facilities set up by pro-life groups that mimic abortion clinics, but attempt to pressure women out of seeking the help they need.

 

You’re going to want to sit down for this one. Fake abortion clinics have been a thing since the 1960s. Today, there are more than 4,000 of them across America while there are fewer than 800 legitimate clinics.

 

They are designed to look like medical facilities in every respect, but because they are not actual clinics, they don’t have to abide by HIPAA privacy laws. That’s right–they don’t have to safeguard any medical information that they might receive.

 

These facilities can exist and carry on with their borked mission because what they do is regarded as religious outreach, which is in turn protected by the First Amendment.

 

Activists are trying to hold fake clinics accountable by pursuing them on truth in advertising laws–making them more clearly admit that they are not abortion clinics and do not provide abortions or referrals to abortion clinics.

 

One of the ways they’re doing this is through the #ExposeFakeClinics website, which is a resource hub for those trying to spread the word about fake clinics.

 

Exposing fake clinics takes several forms. They include:

 

Liking online reviews of legitimate clinics

 

Reviewing fake clinics

 

Reporting fake clinics that engage in false advertising

 

Protesting outside of fake clinics (but scroll down for important information about this)

 

 

See the main Expose Fake Clinics webpage:

https://exposefakeclinics.squarespace.com

 

 

Learn how to spot a fake abortion clinic:

https://exposefakeclinics.squarespace.com/what-is-a-cpc-2/

 

 

Learn if there are fake abortion clinics near you:

https://exposefakeclinics.squarespace.com/cpc/

 

 

Take action against fake abortion clinics (note: if the fake clinic you want to protest in front of is physically near a genuine abortion clinic, check with the real one before you start work. If the real one asks you not to protest in person, please don’t):

https://exposefakeclinics.squarespace.com/take-action-1/

 

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Read the Expose Fake Clinics blog:

https://exposefakeclinics.squarespace.com/blog/

 

 

Like Expose Fake Clinics on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/exposefakeclinics

 

 

 

Call Your Members of Congress · Community Activism · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Read This New Yorker Piece on What Calling Congress Achieves

Read What Calling Congress Achieves, a New Yorker piece that explores that question and gives a history of Americans calling their Congressional representatives.

 

It’s a long read, but a good one. The author not only explores what works and what doesn’t and why, and what a Congressional office would consider a “flood” of phone calls, she goes back to the late 19th-century beginnings of calling Congress.

 

The story is festooned with tasty little anecdotes and wonderful bits of evidence that calling and emailing Congress actually does something.

 

This paragraph, for example:

 

For political watchers, the most striking thing about this outpouring of political activism is its spontaneity. “If Planned Parenthood sends out an e-mail and asks all their donors to contact their Congress members—that’s honest, it’s real, it’s citizen action,” Fitch said. “But this thing was organic: people saw something in the news, it made them angry, and they called their member of Congress.” At this point, he paused and informed me that he was “not one for hyperbolic statements.” But what was happening was, he said, “amazing,” “unprecedented,” “a level of citizen engagement going on out there outside the Beltway that Congress has never experienced before.”

 

And this one:

 

Perhaps the most striking shift so far, though, has happened on the Democratic side of the aisle, in the form of a swift and dramatic stiffening of the spine. In the past month, at the insistence of constituents, the party line has changed from a cautious willingness to work with the White House to staunch and nearly unified opposition. “If you ask me, before the calls started coming in, someone like Neil Gorsuch”—Trump’s pick for the vacant Supreme Court seat—“would have passed with seventy-one votes,” said one Democratic senator’s chief of staff, who has worked on the Hill for close to twenty years. “Now I’d be surprised if he gets to sixty.” More generally, that staffer noted, the newly galvanized left is suddenly helping to set the Party’s agenda. In thinking about Cabinet nominations, Democratic members of Congress had planned to make their stand over Tom Price, then the nominee for Secretary of Health and Human Services—until their constituents chose Betsy DeVos. “That was not a strategic decision made in Washington,” the staffer said. “That was a very personal decision made by all these people outside the Beltway worrying about their kids. We’re not managing this resistance. We can participate in it, but there’s no chance of us managing it.”

 

Oh, and this one:

 

Republicans, of course, can’t manage the resistance, either—and, so far, they are struggling to figure out how to respond. Some have merely expressed frustration that so many calls are apparently coming from out of their district or state. But others, including Senator Marco Rubio, Senator Cory Gardner, and President Trump, have tried to discredit concerned citizens by claiming that they are “paid protesters,” an allegation supported by precisely zero evidence. Still others have expressed disingenuous outrage over political organizing, as when Tim Murtaugh, a spokesperson for Representative Lou Barletta, of Pennsylvania, criticized “the significant percentage who are encouraged to call us by some group.” And other legislators simply turned out not to like their job description. “Since Obamacare and these issues have come up,” Representative Dave Brat, of Virginia, said last month, “the women are in my grill no matter where I go.” In an apparent effort to dodge such interactions, a number of Republican legislators, including Representative Mike Coffman, of Colorado, and Representative Peter Roskam, of Illinois, have cancelled or curtailed town-hall meetings. Other G.O.P. legislators have allegedly been locking their office doors, turning off their phones, and, in general, doing what they can to limit contact with their constituents.

 

…but enough quoting. Go enjoy it for yourself.

 

Read What Calling Congress Achieves:

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/03/06/what-calling-congress-achieves

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

Subscribe to the New Yorker:

https://subscribe.newyorker.com/subscribe/newyorker/111547?source=AMS_NYR_ARTICLE_NAVBAR_MemorialDay_2017&pos_name=AMS_NYR_ARTICLE_NAVBAR

Community Activism · Ethics · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare

Read There Is No Good Card For This: What to Say and Do When Life Is Scary, Awful, and Unfair to People You Love

Read There Is No Good Card for This: What to Say and Do When Life is Scary, Awful, and Unfair to People You Love, by Kelsey Crowe and Emily McDowell.

 

TINGCFT might seem like a not-quite-on-topic choice for a political blog, but bear with us. It’s a great textbook on how to have awkward conversations, how to listen, and how not to be a jerk–skills that are ever more precious and valuable in the time of Trump.

 

McDowell is the genius behind a series of greeting cards that you’d actually want to send to someone who’s going through hell but still has a sense of humor. Crowe holds a doctorate in social welfare, and founded Help Each Other Out, which teaches people how to avoid being the person who ghosts or says and does unhelpful things when bad stuff happens to friends and family.

 

The whole book is a gem, but in particular, it goes over how to help people in the grip of illness, fertility issues, divorce, unemployment, and grief.

 

Some general takeaways:

 

It’s better to do something than nothing. Saying ‘I’m sorry’ is doing something.

Remember it’s about them, not you. Don’t make their problem about you.

Listen.

Your kindness is your credential.

The person who needs help may not respond to your overture the way you’d expect. Don’t hold that against them, and don’t let their response deter you from helping others.

 

 

Buy There Is No Good Card for This at great independent book stores such as The Strand or Powell’s:

http://www.strandbooks.com/index.cfm

http://www.powells.com/book/there-is-no-good-card-for-this-9780062469991/1-5

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

Community Activism · Fighting Bigotry, Racism, Sexism, Homophobia, Transphobia...

Support the Human Rights Campaign

Support the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), the largest LGBTQ civil rights organization.

Founded in 1980, the HRC now counts more than 1.5 million members and supporters worldwide. It fights for a world where LGBTQ people’s basic civil rights are accepted and affirmed, letting them live and work openly and in safety.

 

Visit the HRC website:

http://www.hrc.org

 

Like the HRC Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/humanrightscampaign

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@HRC

 

Donate to HRC:

https://give.hrc.org/ea-action/action?ea.client.id=1954&ea.campaign.id=51848&ea.tracking.id=or_gnr_hrc_homepage_donate&_ga=2.165630524.201866625.1503266821-556932857.1503266821