Action Alerts · Common-sense Gun Laws · Marches and Protests · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Support National Die-in Day on June 12, 2018

Support National Die-in Day on Tuesday, June 12, 2018, and attend the event in Washington, D.C., if you can. 

 

National Die-in Day is the brainchild of two young Orlando, Florida natives, Amanda Fugleberg and Frank Kravchuk. It will take place on the second anniversary of the shooting at the Pulse nightclub, which killed 49.

 

As of late May, the event is planned for Washington, D.C., with no satellite events announced. It will take place in front of the Capitol building and will begin with a rally for gun reform at 10:30 am and culminate in a 12-minute die-in at noon. The timespan was chosen because it lasts 700 seconds, which represents how many have died in mass shootings since the attack at Pulse.

 

 

In addition to joining the event and boosting the #NationalDieInDay hashtag, you can donate to a GoFundMe set up for the event:

https://www.gofundme.com/nationaldiein?member=215408

 

 

You can also like the National Die-in Day Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/National-Die-In-Day-1798187990238689/

 

 

And you can follow it on Twitter:

@NationalDieIn

 

 

Read about plans for the June 12 National Die-in:

https://www.advocate.com/crime/2018/5/26/two-years-after-pulse-massacre-national-die-planned-dc

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/may/21/us-gun-control-protest-high-school-die-in-day

 

 

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Common-sense Gun Laws · Community Activism · Marches and Protests · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Wear Orange On June 1 For National Gun Violence Awareness Day

Plan to wear orange on Friday, June 1, to support National Gun Violence Awareness Day, and see if there’s a Wear Orange Weekend event near you.

 

The Wear Orange movement is an effort championed by Everytown for Gun Safety, but not started by it. The movement began with those who mourned the death of 15-year-old Hadiya Pendleton, who was killed in Chicago in 2013 one week after she participated in President Obama’s second inaugural parade. They donned orange in her honor, and orange became the color of the anti-gun violence movement.

 

Several #WearOrange events have been planned across the country between June 1 to June 3 to raise awareness about gun violence and demand a safer world. They include parades, barbecues, rallies, marches, and more.

 

To find an event near you, enter your zip code into the search engine at this link:

http://act.everytown.org/event/wear-orange-2018/search/?source=emne_WearOrange&utm_source=em_n_&utm_medium=_e&utm_campaign=WearOrange

 

Another way to show support is to take a photo of yourself wearing orange on June 1 and  add it to the gallery here:

https://wearorange.org/wear-orange/

 

 

If you haven’t got anything orange to wear and wish to stock up, you can visit the Wear Orange shop, which has buttons, t-shirts, pins, ribbons, ball caps, and more (note that more than one vendor is reflected here, and the billing process might reflect that):

https://wearorange.org/shop/

 

And of course you can follow the #WearOrange hashtag on social media.

 

 

See the Wear Orange homepage:

https://wearorange.org

 

 

See the Wear Orange About page:

https://wearorange.org/about/

 

 

View the Wear Orange photo gallery:

https://wearorange.org/gallery/?source=emne_WearOrange&utm_source=em_n_&utm_medium=_e&utm_campaign=WearOrange

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

Common-sense Gun Laws · Community Activism · Elections · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms

Help Vote Out the Florida Legislators Who Refused to Open Debate on an Assault Weapons Ban in Their State

Help vote out the Florida legislators who voted against opening debate on a bill that would have banned assault weapons in their state.

 

Marjory Stoneman Douglas (MSD) High School is located in Parkland, Florida. The Valentine’s Day 2018 massacre killed 17 and injured at least 14.

 

The first relevant bill to come up in the Florida legislature following the MSD shooting was HB 219, an assault weapons ban sponsored by Rep. Carlos Guillermo Smith, a Democrat from Orlando, site of the Pulse nightclub attack in 2017, which killed 50. The killers in both the MSD attack and the Orlando incident used semi-automatic weapons, which are often called “assault weapons”.

 

The vote, conducted on February 20, 2018, was about moving the bill from the House Criminal Justice Subcommittee to the House floor, so the full legislative body could begin debate.

 

The vote split along party lines: 36 Democrats voted yes, and 71 Republicans voted no. (Ten others did not vote, and three seats in the Florida house are currently empty.)

 

Some students from MSD were present in the chamber for the vote.

 

They already knew that federal-level representatives were not the only thing standing in the way of saner gun laws, but this was cold, hard proof of the fact.

 

The day after the vote, MSD shooting survivor and senior David Hogg (@davidhogg111) tweeted, “Hope you guys enjoyed being Politicians! “, and included a screenshot showing the name of each Florida house member and how they voted on whether to move HB 219 ahead.

 

If you live in Florida, please check this list and see how your state House rep voted. Call them or email them to thank them if they voted yes or scorn them if they voted no. If you don’t live in Florida, watch for campaigns by Sister District, Flippable, and Postcards to Voters (Tony the Democrat’s effort) that target Florida House candidates.

 

Every single member of Florida’s House will be up for re-election in November. Identify those who need to be voted out, and do what you can to make that happen.

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

See the full roll call for how the Florida House voted on the question of moving HB 219 forward on February 20, 2018:

http://www.tampabay.com/florida-politics/buzz/2018/02/21/how-they-voted-the-roll-call-on-assault-weapons-ban/

 

 

Here’s another story on the same topic, but with contact info for each of the 71 Florida House reps who voted no:

https://www.local10.com/news/parkland-school-shooting/here-is-the-list-of-the-71-who-voted-against-bringing-hb-219-to-florida-house-floor

 

 

And here’s a New York Times piece on how righteously pissed-off MSD students are pressuring the hell out of Florida Republicans. It includes a photo of MSD students watching the February 20, 2018 vote:

 

A note: We at OTYCD intend to nurture and encourage the movement sparked by the Margory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting by devoting one post at least every other week to gun safety-related issues.

 

The reason that the NRA has a death grip on Congress, and in particular, GOP Congressfolk, is that NRA members get off their asses and call if there’s a whisper of a muttering of a hint that a law might pass that could impose even the slightest imposition on ownership of guns in America.

 

That’s what the politicians are afraid of. It’s not just that some of them get metric buttloads of money for their campaigns from the NRA. Those who embrace the NRA’s outlook pounce on their phones and berate their representatives the instant they think their beloved guns are under threat.

 

So, yes, it’s on us to shout back.

 

We have to adopt the tactics of those who support the NRA.

 

We have to call our representatives often to make it damn clear that the status quo is unacceptable, and we want common-sense gun safety laws.

 

OTYCD will start out with one weekday post every two weeks, at minimum, that has to do with improving gun safety and pushing back against the NRA.

 

We do this in honor of the Parkland victims, and all victims of mass shootings in America, and everyone who has been fighting to change our laws on firearms all along.

 

If Trump finally bows to the will of Congress and imposes the sanctions against Russia for messing with the 2016 election, we will switch to devoting one post per week to these issues.

 

Honor the victims of the Parkland shooting, and all other shootings, by stepping up and calling your reps about common-sense gun safety laws, and by supporting politicians who have low grades from the NRA, and voting out those who do the NRA’s bidding.

 

#NeverAgain. For the love of all that is right and good, Never Again.

 

 

Common-sense Gun Laws · Community Activism · Elections · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms

Support Change the Ref, Created By the Parents of Joaquin “Guac” Oliver, Who Died in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Attack

Support Change the Ref, created by the parents of Joaquin “Guac” Oliver, who was one of the 17 who died in the attack on Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida.

 

Manuel and Patricia Oliver started Change the Ref after they lost their 17-year-old son in the shooting at his high school on Valentine’s Day 2018.

 

According to a Washington Post article, the organization’s name came from a frustrating basketball game Oliver played days before he died:

 

“The name of the organization was inspired by a conversation Oliver had with his son only days before he was killed. Joaquin and Manuel were frustrated by a basketball referee’s calls during a game they were playing.

Joaquin noted that the referee may have had connections with the other team.

“Immediately [after the shooting] I remembered that conversation I had with my son, about the need to have a fair game and the need to change the ref,” Oliver said. “If we have politicians that have agreements with powerful groups or lobbyists, they don’t have even an intention of starting a debate.”

 

Change the Ref is dedicated to the memory of Joaquin and those who died in the Parkland shooting. It exists to engage young people and help them learn to be activists for causes that matter to them.

 

Initially, Change the Ref hopes to do this by offering scholarships, hosting town halls, forums, and speaking events at colleges, as well as workshops for budding activists. It also intends to create an app that will help young voters research issues and candidates.

 

 

Visit the Change the Ref webpage:

http://www.changetheref.org

 

 

See its About page:

http://www.changetheref.org/about/

 

 

Donate to Change the Ref (as of mid-April 2018, this GoFundMe had raised almost $35,000 of its $100,000 goal):

https://www.gofundme.com/changetheref

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Like Change the Ref on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/ChangeTheRef/

 

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@ChangeTheRef

 

 

Buy Change the Ref merch:

https://shopchangetheref.org

 

 

Read an April 14, 2018 Washington Post article about Change the Ref, which includes a link to a video of Manuel creating a mural in honor of his son:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/post-nation/wp/2018/04/14/he-lost-his-son-in-parkland-now-he-is-using-art-to-demand-change/?utm_term=.a5d97524034c

Call Your State Legislators · Common-sense Gun Laws · Community Activism

Ask Your State Legislators to Require Gun Owners to Report Lost or Stolen Guns

Ask your state legislators to require gun owners to promptly report lost or stolen guns.

 

It seems ridiculous on its face, but it’s true. More than 36 states do not currently require gun owners to report lost or stolen guns.

 

It makes sense to require gun owners to formally report losses and thefts. Timely reporting makes it harder for firearms to fall into dangerous hands. It can also help them get their guns back.

 

The Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence has comprehensive information on how things are now.

 

According to the center, the only states that broadly require gun-owning residents to report losses or thefts to local law enforcement authorities are:

 

California

Connecticut

Delaware

Illinois

Massachusetts

New Jersey

New York

Ohio

Rhode Island

The District of Columbia also has this requirement.

 

A few states have more limited laws.

 

Michigan specifically requires owners to report thefts, but says nothing about losses.

 

Maryland requires reporting losses and thefts, but only for handguns and assault weapons, not other types of firearms.

 

New Jersey is alone in imposing civil liability on owners who fail to report lost or stolen guns that are later used in a crime, and its law focuses on assault weapons only.

 

 

If your state is not listed above, or has laws that could be improved, please call or email your state legislators and ask them to write a bill to address this problem.

 

To find your state legislators, plug your address and zip code into this web site:

https://whoaremyrepresentatives.org

 

Once you have the two names you need, go to the web site for your state legislature and find the contact information for your state senator and state house rep.

 

 

Contacting your state house rep and state senator is different from contacting your federal-level reps. Calls and emails are equally effective, and you’re far more likely to get through to the actual elected official, rather than a staffer.

 

 

While cautioning that jurisdictions should consult lawyers when approaching this issue, the Giffords center cites several aspects that make for a good common-sense state law regarding lost or stolen firearms:

 

The owners should be required to raise the alarm as soon as possible once they learn their guns are lost or stolen.

 

The legal duty to report starts once the owner knew, or should have known, about the loss or the theft.

 

Those who lost guns or suffered thefts before the law took effect should be given a reasonable deadline for reporting those losses and thefts.

 

The law on reporting losses and thefts should apply to all firearms, not just assault weapons or handguns.

 

Owners should face civil liabilities for not reporting the loss or theft of a gun that is later used in a crime.

 

Requiring owners to report losses and thefts swiftly should be a condition of receiving a state gun license or registration, and failure to report losses and thefts soon after discovery should be enough to justify yanking those permissions.

 

 

FWIW, federal law does not require individual gun owners to report–but it does require firearms dealers who suffer thefts or losses from their inventories to speak up. Right now, we at OTYCD feel it best to ask you to focus on getting state-level laws passed to fix this problem.

 

 

 

Visit the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence:

lawcenter.giffords.org

 

 

Donate to the center:

https://giffordslawcenter.networkforgood.com/projects/38759-giffords-law-center-to-prevent-gun-violence

 

 

Like it on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/giffords/

 

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@GiffordsCourage

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

See a January 2018 PBS Newshour transcript that notes in passing that 39 states do not require gun owners to report lost or stolen guns (scroll down a little):

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/show/gun-owning-group-in-oregon-advocates-for-firearm-safety

 

 

A note: We at OTYCD intend to nurture and encourage the movement sparked by the Margory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting by devoting one post at least every other week to gun safety-related issues.

 

The reason that the NRA has a death grip on Congress, and in particular, GOP Congressfolk, is that NRA members get off their asses and call if there’s a whisper of a muttering of a hint that a law might pass that could impose even the slightest imposition on ownership of guns in America.

 

That’s what the politicians are afraid of. It’s not just that some of them get metric buttloads of money for their campaigns from the NRA. Those who embrace the NRA’s outlook pounce on their phones and berate their representatives the instant they think their beloved guns are under threat.

 

So, yes, it’s on us to shout back.

 

We have to adopt the tactics of those who support the NRA.

 

We have to call our representatives often to make it damn clear that the status quo is unacceptable, and we want common-sense gun safety laws.

 

OTYCD will start out with one weekday post every two weeks, at minimum, that has to do with improving gun safety and pushing back against the NRA.

 

We do this in honor of the Parkland victims, and all victims of mass shootings in America, and everyone who has been fighting to change our laws on firearms all along.

 

If Trump finally bows to the will of Congress and imposes the sanctions against Russia for messing with the 2016 election, we will switch to devoting one post per week to these issues.

 

Honor the victims of the Parkland shooting, and all other shootings, by stepping up and calling your reps about common-sense gun safety laws, and by supporting politicians who have low grades from the NRA, and voting out those who do the NRA’s bidding.

 

#NeverAgain. For the love of all that is right and good, Never Again.

Common-sense Gun Laws · Community Activism · Elections · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Organize a March For Our Lives: 50 Miles More Event in Your State (If You’re a High School Student)

Are you a student? Organize a March for Our Lives: 50 Miles More event in your state.

 

In late March 2018, a group of about 50 high school students in Wisconsin marched from Madison to Janesville, the home base of Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, to protest Congressional inaction on common-sense gun laws.

 

The students were inspired by March for Our Lives, the movement started by the survivors of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas attack in Parkland, Florida, as well as the 1965 Selma to Montgomery civil rights march, which spanned 54 miles.

 

Their website states the following demands:

  • Military-style weapons, and all weapons of war, should be banned from civilian society.
  • All accessories that turn semi-automatic weapons into automatic weapons, such as bump stocks, should be banned.
  • Four day waiting period on all gun purchases.
  • Require background checks on all gun sales.
  • Raise the legal purchasing age of all guns to 21.

 

The Wisconsinites completed their march on March 28. Now they’re asking their peers in other states to follow their example and host similar events before the mid-term elections in 2018.

 

If you are a high school student who wants to plan a march in your home state, fill out the form on the page below, and someone will contact you:

 

Host your own #50MilesMore march:

https://50milesmore.org/host-march/

 

 

See the main 50 Miles More website:

https://50milesmore.org

 

 

See the 50 Miles More Mission Statement:

https://50milesmore.org/about-us/#50MM-MISSION

 

 

See the 50 Miles More Policy Demands page:

https://50milesmore.org/about-us/#50MM-POLICYDEMANDS

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Donate to 50 Miles More:

https://actionnetwork.org/fundraising/donate-support-50-miles-more-march-for-our-lives?source=direct_link&

 

 

Like 50 Miles More on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/50MilesMore/

 

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@50MilesMore

 

 

Read about the original Wisconsin 50 Miles More march:

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/03/27/wisconsin-students-marching-50-miles-paul-ryans-hometown-action-gun-laws/461407002/

 

 

Common-sense Gun Laws · Community Activism · Health Care · Public Education · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms

Support Students for Changes, an Advocacy Group Started by Marjory Stoneman Douglas Students

Support Students for Changes, a nonprofit advocacy group started by students of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, site of the deadly shooting on February 14, 2018.

 

Cofounded by three survivors of the attack that killed 17 of their peers and teachers, Students for Changes focuses on three things: gun safety, mental health, and school safety. The ultimate goal is to create a world where deadly school shootings are memories and not ever-present threats.

 

 

The pinned tweet on its Twitter page as of early March 2018 stated:

This Nonprofit Organization is started and led by Marjory Stoneman Douglas students. We’ve made this for the express purpose of connecting and consolidating the efforts of students nationwide to change our current policies and societal notions.

 

 

During the same period, its Twitter feed thanked Delta Airlines for rescinding the group discount it had offered to National Rifle Association (NRA) members, thanked Kroger, Walmart, and L.L. Bean for raising their minimum customer age for gun sales to 21, and promised to keep fighting after the Florida state senate passed, then quickly revoked, a two-year ban on the AR-15 semi-automatic rifle.

 

 

The founders intend this to be a student-led movement, and they encourage the creation of chapters in schools across America. As of March 4, 2018, SSC is filing to become a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit.

 

 

Visit the Students for Changes webpage:

https://www.studentsforchanges.org

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Donate to Students for Changes:

https://www.studentsforchanges.org/copy-of-make-a-donation

 

 

Like it on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/studentsforchanges/

 

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@students4c