Community Activism · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Thank You Actions · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends · Vote with your Dollars

Support The Guardian, the Newspaper That Ben Jacobs Works For

This OTYCD entry originally posted in May 2017.

Support The Guardian, the British paper that employs reporter Ben Jacobs. 

By now you’ve heard about how Greg Gianforte, Republican candidate for the open house seat representing all of Montana, snapped and attacked Ben Jacobs, a reporter for The Guardian. Jacobs is evidently OK and Gianforte has since been charged with a misdemeanor. (Gianforte also won the Congressional race.)

While we wish we had a more pleasant prompt, we’re taking it. The Guardian is a good newspaper, and has long been a good newspaper. It deserves your attention and your support.

 

Read the links below, and if you like it, become a supporter of The Guardian:

https://membership.theguardian.com/us/supporter?INTCMP=DOTCOM_HEADER_BECOMEMEMBER_US

 

Here’s Jacobs’s video report on his bizarre encounter with Gianforte:

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/video/2017/may/25/guardian-ben-jacobs-body-slam-video-greg-gianforte

 

Here’s the story Jacobs filed with The Guardian shortly before the infamous meeting:

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/may/25/montana-special-election-gianforte-assault-charge-guardian

 

Here’s the story that Jacobs wrote that probably played a role in pissing off Gianforte:

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/apr/28/greg-gianforte-republican-candidate-congress-russia-companies

 

And here’s another story by others at The Guardian on the consequences that Gianforte suffered shortly after attacking Jacobs:

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/may/25/newspapers-ditch-us-republican-charged-with-assaulting-guardian-reporter-montana

 

 

Community Activism · Save These Tools · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Remember to Donate to Food Banks During the Summer Months, When Schools Are Closed

Remember to make a point of donating to your local food banks during the summer months, when schools are closed.

 

Students who receive free and reduced-price school meals can suffer during the summer, when their schools close. Their schools are often their most reliable source of nutritious meals. While many communities have programs that feed children under 18 during the summer, not all do.

 

It’s almost a cliche to volunteer at soup kitchens and food banks during Thanksgiving and Christmas, but summer is when the need can be keenest.

 

Food donations are always welcome at food banks, but donations of money are even more effective. Also ask your food bank if they accept donations of diapers, toilet paper, and feminine hygiene products, which cannot be purchased with food stamps.

 

 

Find your nearest food bank:

http://www.feedingamerica.org/find-your-local-foodbank/

 

 

Donate to the AmpleHarvest.org food pantry network:

http://ampleharvest.org/donate-m1/

 

 

Find the nearest summer meals program in your community:

https://www.fns.usda.gov/summerfoodrocks

 

Action Alerts · Community Activism · Fighting Bigotry, Racism, Sexism, Homophobia, Transphobia... · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms

Support The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights

Support the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, America’s premier civil and human rights coalition.

 

Founded in 1950, it has coordinated national lobbying efforts on behalf of every major piece of civil rights law since 1957. More than 200 national organizations that concern themselves with civil and human rights belong to the Leadership Conference.

 

Recently, it has been all over efforts to defend DACA and the Dreamers; it has fought efforts to suppress voting rights; and it has pushed back on Trump’s attempted ban on transgender military personnel. Trump’s been keeping the conference busy, that’s for sure.

 

The Conference also sounds the alarm about lousy federal court appointments and tracks the civil and human rights voting records of each session of Congress, among other things.

 

 

Visit the home page of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights:

http://civilrights.org

 

 

Check out the civil and human rights voting records of every session of Congress from the 91st to the 113th, and learn about crummy pending federal appointments that you should oppose:

http://civilrights.org/our-advocacy/

 

 

Visit its online Action Center:

http://civilrights.org/take-action/

 

 

Donate to the organization:

http://civilrights.org/donate/

 

 

Like it on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/civilandhumanrights

 

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@civilrightsorg

 

 

Also follow its president and CEO, Vanita Gupta, on Twitter:

@vanitaguptaCR

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

Candidates · Community Activism · Elections · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms

Support Emerge America, Which Trains Democratic Women Candidates to Run for Office

Support Emerge America, which trains Democratic women candidates to run for office.

 

Founded in California in 2002, Emerge America now has outposts in 24 states, and has hopes to expand to all 50. Its aim is to increase the number of Democratic women who hold office in America by recruiting them, training them, and building a network of them.

 

Emerge America offers a 70-hour training program, spread over six months (one weekend per month), which covers vital topics such as campaign strategy, public speaking, fundraising, endorsements, mastering new media, field operations, ethics, networking, and more.

 

Their work is starting to pay off. In 2016, the win rate for Emerge America alumnae was 70 percent. In November 2017, it was 73 percent.

 

 

See the Emerge America webpage:

https://emerge.ngpvanhost.com

 

 

Learn about its training program:

https://emerge.ngpvanhost.com/training

 

 

See if your state is among the 24 that has Emerge America chapters, or among the five in development:

https://emerge.ngpvanhost.com/states

 

 

Donate to Emerge America:

https://emerge.ngpvanhost.com/contribute

 

 

Like Emerge America on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/EmergeAmerica

 

 

Follow Emerge America on Twitter:

@EmergeAmerica

 

 

Read a Washington Post story about a post-Trump class of Emerge America graduates:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/magazine/this-group-trains-women-to-run-for-office-heres-how-one-outraged-post-trump-class-fared/2018/02/12/d9de3d02-020d-11e8-bb03-722769454f82_story.html?utm_term=.dc20866b4866

Community Activism · Elections · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Join Run For Something, And, You Know, Run For Something

Support Run for Something, an organization that recruits people who are under the age of 35 to run for elected office.

Look at Congress and an inescapable fact jumps out at you. Most of the members–the good ones and the bad ones–are on the old side. Some are downright elderly. To be fair, age is not, in and of itself, a barrier to holding elected office, nor should it be. But history shows that Congressfolks are all too happy to coast on their momentum as incumbents long after they’ve lost their drive to effectively serve their constituents.

Run For Something launched on Inauguration Day 2017. It’s one of many progressive organization that sprung up in the wake of the November 2016 election. Its purpose is to recruit young talent–people aged 35 and younger–to run for elected office as state legislators, mayors, city councilors, and the like. It is dedicated to helping more young people get on the ballot generally, and it hopes to build a progressive farm team of left-leaning political talent.

The organization will talk to everyone who fits the profile and expresses interest. It will liaise with similar organizations, such as EMILY’s List, She Should Run, Emerge, the Latino Victory Project, and others. In select cases, it will furnish money and staff.

 

Since we wrote and queued this post, Run For Something proved itself in spectacular fashion on November 8, 2017. It ran 72 candidates in 14 states for state and local races across the country, and 32 of those candidates won. (That number might rise to 34 once recounts in two Virginia House of Delegates races are completed.)

Those neophyte candidates backed by Run For Something notched a success rate of more than 40 percent, when 10 percent is far more typical.

Its winners included Danica Roem, the transgender woman who defeated a longterm incumbent and an avowed homophobe for a Virginia legislature, and Chris Hurst, a former journalist whose journalist girlfriend was killed live, on-air, by a deranged, armed man. He ran for a Virginia state seat on a gun safety platform and beat a three-time incumbent who was backed by the NRA.

Run For Something also supported Ashley Bennett, who got angry when a representative of hers in Atlantic City, N.J., mocked attendees of the Women’s March by wondering if the protest would end in time for them to come home and cook dinner. She ran for his Atlantic County board seat and wrested it away from him.

Run For Something is doing powerful work at the most granular level of government–school committees, planning boards, and the like–spotting young, promising talents and building a strong, progressive farm team from which tomorrow’s political stars will come. It deserves your support.

 

Visit the Run For Something webpage:

https://www.runforsomething.net

 

Learn about the current slate of Run For Something candidates:

https://www.runforsomething.net/candidates

 

Donate to Run For Something:

https://secure.actblue.com/contribute/page/rfs?refcode=nav

 

Follow Run For Something on Twitter:

@runforsomething

 

Like it on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/runforsomethingpac

 

Read stories about Run For Something and its November 2017 success:

http://time.com/4974562/amanda-litman-run-for-something/

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/page/ct-perspec-page-donald-trump-virginia-northam-danica-roem-gillespie-1113-20171110-story.html

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/11/9/16625966/run-for-something-progressives-local-election-virginia

Community Activism · Postcard Campaigns · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends · Vote with your Dollars

Help Tony the Democrat and Postcards to Voters with a Recurring Monthly $20 Donation

Help Tony the Democrat and the Postcards to Voters army by committing to a recurring monthly $20 donation to sustain its good work.

 

If you read One Thing You Can Do, you know about Tony the Democrat and the Postcards to Voters army. We’ve written about it since the beginning, back in March 2017, before it was a thing.

 

Well, Postcards to Voters is definitely a thing now. As of mid-May 2018, it has more than 20,000 postcard-writing volunteers, who have helped more than 50 candidates in federal, state, and local races across America win runoffs, special elections, and general elections.

 

Recently, Postcards to Voters and Erika from Collective Vision, who creates and sells postcards designed with the Postcards to Voters army in mind, announced a new effort.

 

With the mid-term elections coming, Postcards to Voters needs to increase and strengthen its finances. It’s asking folks to commit to a sustained monthly pledge. The dependable funds will help Tony and friends recruit more postcard writers and accept larger address lists from candidates for office.

 

Erika at Collective Vision has a special offer for those who commit to a sustained $20 per month pledge by May 27, 2018.

 

If you sign on, you will receive a free, one-time gift of an 100-card set of a new, not-yet-released postcard design. (The rest of the world gets to see it and buy it in early summer.)

 

Some things to know about the $20 sustained contribution:

 

Committing to a sustained $20 contribution means you agree to give Postcards to Voters $20 every month, month after month, until and unless you cancel it.

 

Your pledge isn’t tax-deductible.

 

If you’re already giving Postcards to Voters $20 a month, you will receive the 100-pack of the new postcard design automatically.

 

You can’t do sustained donations through PayPal, sorry.

 

The 100-pack will be mailed to the billing address that you give on the donation page. If you need Erika to send the postcard pack to a different address, email her at postcards @collectivevision.us (but know also that she’s away between May 16 through 26, 2018).

 

If you offer a sustained donation of $40 per month, you will receive two 100-postcard packs, and for every additional $20 you can pledge monthly, you’ll get another 100-count pack.

 

You can cancel your sustained pledge at any time.

 

If you can’t commit to $20 per month, don’t feel bad! Every bit helps, even if all you can do is tell other people about Postcards to Voters and invite them to join.

 

 

See Erika’s offer to those who pledge $20 per month to Postcards to Voters.

 

 

If that link doesn’t work for whatever reason, see Erika’s post about it on the Collective Vision Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/CollectiveVisionPostcards/

 

 

Set up your $20 recurring donation to Postcards to Voters:

https://postcardstovoters.givingfuel.com/welcome

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

See the Postcards to Voters homepage:

https://postcardstovoters.org/

 

 

See the Collective Vision homepage:

https://www.collectivevision.us/

 

 

Follow Postcards to Voters on Twitter:

@DemocratWit

 

 

Like Postcards to Voters on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/TonyTheDemocrat.org/

 

 

Follow Collective Vision on Twitter:

@write_congress

 

 

Like it on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/CollectiveVisionPostcards/

Community Activism

Help Children in Illinois Prisons by Donating to Liberation Library

Help children serving sentences in Illinois prisons through Liberation Library, which gives them books.

 

Liberation Library is a volunteer-led group based in Chicago that serves children in prison and juvenile detention centers in Illinois. Its members ask the kids what they’d like to read, and gets those titles.

 

They believe access to books is a right, not a privilege. Twice a month, it hosts “packing days,” in which volunteers prep and mail books to young readers.

 

It also sends birthday cards to incarcerated children year-round, and holiday cards around Christmas.

 

 

See the Liberation Library webpage:

http://www.liberationlib.com

 

 

See its About page:

http://www.liberationlib.com/about.html

 

 

See its FAQ page, which includes advice on how to find a Liberation Library-type organization in your community, or set one up:

http://www.liberationlib.com/faqs.html

 

 

Sign up for its newsletter:

http://liberationlib.us10.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=b3d1719ad4771efe8f1a9b022&id=a7c868d487&orig-lang=1

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Donate money or gently used books to Liberation Library (please check if the books are on LL’s Amazon Wishlist first):

http://www.liberationlib.com/donate.html

 

 

Donate birthday cards for use by Liberation Library, or purchase blank birthday cards from its Amazon Wishlist:

http://www.liberationlib.com/birthday-cards.html

 

 

If you live in or near Chicago, volunteer for Liberation Library:

http://www.liberationlib.com/volunteer.html

 

 

Like its Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/LiberationLibrary

 

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@liberationlib