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Learn How Every Member of the House of Representatives Voted on the GOP Tax Bill

Bookmark this New York Times article, which shows how all 435 members of the House of Representatives voted in November 2017 on the GOP tax bill.

 

We at OTYCD included a link to this article in one of the daily updates we did on the GOP tax bill in the leadup to the vote. We wanted to break it out in a separate post, with a dedicated headline, so you can find it and reference it more easily.

 

The story spotlights the votes of 28 Republican house members who represent districts in states with relatively high state and local taxes (these taxes are sometimes identified with the acronym SALT). Since the article appeared on November 16, 2017, Ed Royce, a California Republican who voted yes on the bill, has decided not to run again. Another California Republican, Darrell Issa, has also declared plans to retire from his seat, but he voted against the bill.

 

If you’re wondering how the Senate voted and why it didn’t get its own article–that body voted in favor on party lines, 51-48. If your senators are Republicans, they voted yes. If yours are Democratic or Independents, they voted no.

 

Only one Republican House Rep changed his position between the November vote and the final approval in December 2017–Republican Tom McClintock, representative of California’s 4th District, went from a No in November to a Yes in December. GOP leadership evidently pressured New Jersey Republican Rodney Frelinghuysen to flip to a yes, but he resisted.

 

See the New York Times piece detailing how every House member voted on the GOP tax bill:

 

Read also about how California House Rep Tom McClintock was the only Republican to change his vote on the GOP tax bill, switching from no to yes. It also mentions the pressure that New Jersey Republican House Rep Rodney Frelinghuysen faced, but resisted:

https://www.rollcall.com/news/policy/house-passes-tax-overhaul-members-change-november-vote

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

Candidates · Choose Your Core Four · Elections

GOOD UPDATE! Support Conor Lamb’s Run for a Pennsylvania House Seat in a March 2018 Special Election

This OTYCD entry originally posted in January 2018.

 

Update March 24, 2018: This was a nail-biter. Lamb had a slight but clear lead of 627 votes by the end of the night on March 13, 2018–a margin that was smaller than half a percentage point, and smaller than the number of votes cast for the Libertarian candidate. A recount begun on Friday, March 16 increased Lamb’s lead slightly, nudging it past 800 votes.

 

Republican opponent Rick Saccone called Lamb to concede the election on March 21. Lamb will lead Pennsylvania’s 18th District until November, when new electoral maps, designed to combat the effects of pro-Republican gerrymandering, go into effect. Lamb will run in the 17th District, and Saccone will run in the 14th District.

 

Read a Washington Post story about the conclusion of the Pennsylvania special election:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/powerpost/wp/2018/03/21/republican-rick-saccone-concedes-defeat-to-conor-lamb-in-pennsylvania-special-election/?utm_term=.fab09594cdc3

 

Original text of the post follows:

 

Support Democrat Conor Lamb’s run for the open house seat in Pennsylvania’s 18th district. The special election takes place on March 13, 2018.

 

Lamb, 33, is a former federal prosecutor who did notable work tackling the opioid crisis in and around Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He is also a veteran of the Marine corps, where he rose to the rank of captain. He comes from a political family; his grandfather and his uncle prominently served in high-profile state posts.

 

Lamb is facing Republican state rep Rick Saccone, who likes to say that he “was Trump before Trump was Trump.” Lamb has never held elected office, and PA-18 has a strong Republican reputation. Given the overperformances by Democrats in special elections and state and local elections since Trump was elected, the Democrats believe that Lamb has a decent shot at the House seat.

 

Republican Tim Murphy vacated the seat in October 2017 after news broke that the pro-life Congressman had evidently urged a pregnant mistress to abort. He had held the Congressional seat since 2003.

 

 

See Lamb’s campaign website (scroll down for his bio):

https://conorlamb.com

 

 

Consider Lamb for your Core Four for 2018 (if he wins the special election, he’ll be up for re-election in November 2018; if he loses in March, he could choose to run again):

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/24/choose-your-core-four-for-2018/

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Donate to Conor Lamb:

https://secure.actblue.com/donate/lamb-for-congress-1

 

 

Like him on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/ConorLambPA/

 

 

Follow him on Twitter:

@ConorLambPA

 

 

See Ballotpedia’s page on Pennsylvania’s 18th District:

https://ballotpedia.org/Pennsylvania%27s_18th_Congressional_District_special_election,_2018

 

 

Read about the Democrats choosing Lamb for the special election (there were no primaries in this case):

http://www.post-gazette.com/news/politics-local/2017/11/19/Conor-Lamb-Democrats-pick-replace-Tim-Murphy-18th-Congressional-district/stories/201711190199

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/powerpost/wp/2017/11/19/democrats-pick-former-federal-prosecutor-for-special-congressional-election-in-pennsylvania/?utm_term=.a8c9eb22c663

 

 

Read a Politico story about how the Lamb-Saccone contest could be a bellwether for the 2018 midterms:

https://www.politico.com/story/2017/12/23/republicans-brace-for-competitive-pennsylvania-house-race-316206

 

 

Read about the circumstances of Murphy’s retirement from Congress:

https://www.politico.com/story/2017/10/04/tim-murphy-abortion-mistress-243456

Candidates · Choose Your Core Four · Elections

Support Democrat DuWayne Gregory’s Bid to Unseat New York House Rep Peter King

Support Democrat DuWayne Gregory’s bid to unseat Republican New York House Rep Peter King in the state’s 2nd District.

 

Gregory is a Long Island native, an Army veteran, and has served in the Suffolk County legislature since 2008. He supports a $15 minimum wage, paid family leave, equal pay, and measures that seek environmental justice–laws that ensure that the poor and the marginalized aren’t shunted into the most polluted areas.

 

He will fight Right to Work legislation, which undermines unions. He is furious about the constraints on State and Local Tax (SALT) deductions imposed by the GOP tax bill and will do his damnedest to reverse them. He supports laws that address climate change. He fiercely defends Planned Parenthood and the right to choose.

 

Gregory ran against longtime Republican incumbent Peter King in 2016 and lost decisively, getting 37.9 percent of the vote to King’s 62.1 percent. Gregory will also face three other Democrats in the June 26, 2018 primary. The Cook Political Report rates the seat as Solid Republican.

 

 

See Gregory’s campaign site:

http://duwaynegregory.nationbuilder.com

 

 

See his Issues page:

http://duwaynegregory.nationbuilder.com/issues

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Donate to Gregory’s campaign:

https://secure.actblue.com/donate/dg2018

 

 

Include Gregory in your Core Four:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2018/04/08/choose-your-core-four-for-2018/

 

 

Like Gregory on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/GregoryForCongress/

 

 

Follow him on Twitter:

@GregoryForNY2

Candidates · Community Activism · Elections · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms

Support Emerge America, Which Trains Democratic Women Candidates to Run for Office

Support Emerge America, which trains Democratic women candidates to run for office.

 

Founded in California in 2002, Emerge America now has outposts in 24 states, and has hopes to expand to all 50. Its aim is to increase the number of Democratic women who hold office in America by recruiting them, training them, and building a network of them.

 

Emerge America offers a 70-hour training program, spread over six months (one weekend per month), which covers vital topics such as campaign strategy, public speaking, fundraising, endorsements, mastering new media, field operations, ethics, networking, and more.

 

Their work is starting to pay off. In 2016, the win rate for Emerge America alumnae was 70 percent. In November 2017, it was 73 percent.

 

 

See the Emerge America webpage:

https://emerge.ngpvanhost.com

 

 

Learn about its training program:

https://emerge.ngpvanhost.com/training

 

 

See if your state is among the 24 that has Emerge America chapters, or among the five in development:

https://emerge.ngpvanhost.com/states

 

 

Donate to Emerge America:

https://emerge.ngpvanhost.com/contribute

 

 

Like Emerge America on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/EmergeAmerica

 

 

Follow Emerge America on Twitter:

@EmergeAmerica

 

 

Read a Washington Post story about a post-Trump class of Emerge America graduates:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/magazine/this-group-trains-women-to-run-for-office-heres-how-one-outraged-post-trump-class-fared/2018/02/12/d9de3d02-020d-11e8-bb03-722769454f82_story.html?utm_term=.dc20866b4866

Community Activism · Elections · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Join Run For Something, And, You Know, Run For Something

Support Run for Something, an organization that recruits people who are under the age of 35 to run for elected office.

Look at Congress and an inescapable fact jumps out at you. Most of the members–the good ones and the bad ones–are on the old side. Some are downright elderly. To be fair, age is not, in and of itself, a barrier to holding elected office, nor should it be. But history shows that Congressfolks are all too happy to coast on their momentum as incumbents long after they’ve lost their drive to effectively serve their constituents.

Run For Something launched on Inauguration Day 2017. It’s one of many progressive organization that sprung up in the wake of the November 2016 election. Its purpose is to recruit young talent–people aged 35 and younger–to run for elected office as state legislators, mayors, city councilors, and the like. It is dedicated to helping more young people get on the ballot generally, and it hopes to build a progressive farm team of left-leaning political talent.

The organization will talk to everyone who fits the profile and expresses interest. It will liaise with similar organizations, such as EMILY’s List, She Should Run, Emerge, the Latino Victory Project, and others. In select cases, it will furnish money and staff.

 

Since we wrote and queued this post, Run For Something proved itself in spectacular fashion on November 8, 2017. It ran 72 candidates in 14 states for state and local races across the country, and 32 of those candidates won. (That number might rise to 34 once recounts in two Virginia House of Delegates races are completed.)

Those neophyte candidates backed by Run For Something notched a success rate of more than 40 percent, when 10 percent is far more typical.

Its winners included Danica Roem, the transgender woman who defeated a longterm incumbent and an avowed homophobe for a Virginia legislature, and Chris Hurst, a former journalist whose journalist girlfriend was killed live, on-air, by a deranged, armed man. He ran for a Virginia state seat on a gun safety platform and beat a three-time incumbent who was backed by the NRA.

Run For Something also supported Ashley Bennett, who got angry when a representative of hers in Atlantic City, N.J., mocked attendees of the Women’s March by wondering if the protest would end in time for them to come home and cook dinner. She ran for his Atlantic County board seat and wrested it away from him.

Run For Something is doing powerful work at the most granular level of government–school committees, planning boards, and the like–spotting young, promising talents and building a strong, progressive farm team from which tomorrow’s political stars will come. It deserves your support.

 

Visit the Run For Something webpage:

https://www.runforsomething.net

 

Learn about the current slate of Run For Something candidates:

https://www.runforsomething.net/candidates

 

Donate to Run For Something:

https://secure.actblue.com/contribute/page/rfs?refcode=nav

 

Follow Run For Something on Twitter:

@runforsomething

 

Like it on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/runforsomethingpac

 

Read stories about Run For Something and its November 2017 success:

http://time.com/4974562/amanda-litman-run-for-something/

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/page/ct-perspec-page-donald-trump-virginia-northam-danica-roem-gillespie-1113-20171110-story.html

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/11/9/16625966/run-for-something-progressives-local-election-virginia

Call Your State Legislators · Elections · Ethics · Stand Up for Norms · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Ask Your State Legislators to Pass a Bill Requiring Presidential Candidates to Release Their Tax Returns Or Else

This OTYCD entry originally posted in April 2017.

Have a look at this bill that Massachusetts State Senator Michael Barrett proposed that would require all presidential and vice presidential candidates to release five years’ worth of tax returns, and ask your own state legislators to pass a similar bill. 

When the feds are asleep at the wheel, we citizens have to turn to state and local government to step in and steer as best they can. Trump promised to release his tax returns when he was a presidential candidate, but has consistently refused to honor his pledge. Enter Massachusetts state senator Mike Barrett, who’s doing his best to make sure no one else can pull the same move without consequences.

In January he proposed Bill S.365, titled An Act Restoring Financial Transparency in Presidential Elections. If passed, it would require all presidential and vice presidential candidates to release five years’ worth of tax returns if they want to appear on the state’s ballot. Candidates who fail to comply lose the right to appear on the ballot; they could only compete as a write-in.

Brendan Berger, who handles communications for Barrett, says the state senator consulted constitutional law professor Laurence Tribe, on the bill, and reports that Tribe believes it will pass muster.

Could your state pass something similar?

First, check and make sure your state legislators aren’t already on the case. A handful of states, all heavily Democratic, are pursuing similar measures.

If your state legislators aren’t mulling a bill like this one yet, call or email them and ask them to consider it.

To find your state legislators, plug your address and zip code into this web site:

https://whoaremyrepresentatives.org

Once you have the two names you need, go to the web site for your state legislature and find the contact information for your state senator and state house rep.

Contacting your state house rep and state senator is different from contacting your federal-level reps. Calls and emails are equally effective, and you’re far more likely to get through to the actual elected official. It might be best to start with your state senator, seeing as Barrett is a state senator.

Sample email: Dear State Senator (Lastname), I am (Firstname Lastname), and I live in (town, zip code). I am emailing to ask if you would consider introducing a bill that would require all presidential and vice presidential candidates to release five years’ worth of tax returns in order to appear on our state’s ballot. Having a law like this in place would prevent future candidates from refusing to release their returns, as Trump has. I have (attached/included a link) to a Massachusetts bill now under consideration that is designed to address this issue. Thanks for considering my request. Sincerely, (Firstname Lastname).

 

Read the text of Massachusetts State Senator Mike Barrett’s bill:

https://malegislature.gov/Bills/190/S365/Senate/Bill/Text

 

Read Barrett’s statement about his bill, S.365, which explains it in plainer language:

http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Mass–law-can-compel-presidential-candidates-to-release-their-tax-returns—So-let-s-do-it—The-Barrett-Report–December–2016-.html?soid=1110058483636&aid=dXsAzV6_NRA

 

Read stories from Massachusetts newspapers on Barrett’s bill:

https://www.boston.com/news/politics/2016/12/15/this-massachusetts-bill-could-block-donald-trump-from-the-ballot-in-2020

http://lexington.wickedlocal.com/news/20161214/senator-mike-barret-d-lexington-wants-presidential-candidates-tax-returns-to-run-for-office-in-massachusetts

 

This Politico article contains references to efforts in Illinois and New Mexico to pass state bills that are similar to that of Barrett’s (scroll down a good bit):

http://www.politico.com/story/2017/02/state-legislators-trump-trolling-234919

 

Special thanks to Brendan Berger for answering OTYCD‘s questions about Mike Barrett’s bill via DM on Twitter. Please follow him: @brendanberger

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Candidates · Choose Your Core Four · Elections

Support Beto O’Rourke, Who Is Challenging Ted Cruz for His Texas Senate Seat in 2018

Support Beto O’Rourke, a Democrat who will challenge Republican Ted Cruz for his Texas senate seat in 2018.

 

Texas Democrats have long pined to turn the state blue. There’s no question that Republican Senator Ted Cruz is vulnerable. His poll numbers are low and his fellow senators don’t like him. In his recent book, Giant of the Senate, Al Franken likens Cruz to the ‘Dwight Schrute of the Senate.’ For those who didn’t watch the American version of The Office, that means Cruz is goddamn insufferable as a co-worker.

 

O’Rourke won his March 2018 primary with no trouble, but he’ll have a tougher road from here on in. Cruz won his Senate seat in 2012 with more than 56 percent of the vote (the Democratic candidate got a bit more than 40 percent). He’s hated, but he has incumbency in his favor. And Texas is still more red than purple. But every legislative seat deserves a Democratic challenger, and O’Rourke has accepted.

 

O’Rourke is a fourth-generation Texan who speaks fluent Spanish. He believes that health care is a right, not a privilege. He supports public schools and caring for veterans. He wants to end big-money donations and gerrymandering. He prefers term limits. He wants to give immigrants a clear path to earning American citizenship.

 

 

See O’Rourke’s website:

https://www.betofortexas.com

 

 

See his About page:

https://www.betofortexas.com/about-beto

 

 

Consider O’Rourke for your Core Four for 2018:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/24/choose-your-core-four-for-2018/

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

 

Read a Vanity Fair piece on O’Rourke and his quest:

https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2017/05/beto-orourke-ted-cruz-texas-senate-2018

 

 

Read about how he has pledged not to take donations from corporations or PACs:

http://www.politifact.com/texas/statements/2017/jul/27/beto-orourke/beto-orourke-claims-near-uniqueness-not-taking-cor/

 

 

Read a New York Times op-ed that articulates the challenges O’Rourke faces:

 

Like him on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/betoorourke

 

 

Follow him on Twitter:

@BetoORourke

 

 

Donate to O’Rourke:

https://secure.actblue.com/contribute/page/beto-homepage?refcode=homepage

 

 

Buy his merch:

https://store.betofortexas.com