Uncategorized

Learn Which 36 Governorships Are On the Ballot in 2018

Learn which 36 governorships are on the ballot in 2018.

In addition to hundreds of Congressional races, 2018 is a big year for governorships. No less than 36 of the 50 posts will be contested. As of January 1, 2018, 17 sitting governors intend to run and 17 others won’t run again or are term-limited out.

A total of 26 of those 36 governorships are held by Republicans, which creates a huge opportunity for Democratic pickups.

The situation also creates opportunities to break Republican trifectas and maybe create a few new Democratic trifectas.

A trifecta happens when one party controls the governorship and both chambers of a state’s legislature. If a majority of states muster trifectas, those states could call a Constitutional Convention and rewrite the basics of how our country is governed.

Maneuvering America toward a Constitutional Convention has been a long-term goal of some right-wing groups. Frustrating Republican trifectas should factor into your concerns as a voter and a citizen.

What follows is a list of the 36 governors’ races, and notes on whether the incumbent is running.

 

Alabama: Republican incumbent Kay Ivey is running. She was sworn in in April 2017 after the previous governor, Republican Robert Bentley, resigned following a scandal that could have ended in impeachment. Alabama has a Republican trifecta.

At least six Democratic candidates will run in the June 5 primary.

 

Alaska: Independent incumbent Bill Walker is running for his second term. He won in 2014 with 48.1 percent of the vote.

As of January 1, 2018, no Democrats had declared they would run in the August 21 primary.

 

Arizona: Republican incumbent Doug Doucey is running for a second term. He won in 2014 with 53.4 percent of the vote. Arizona has a Republican trifecta.

At least two Democrats will run in the August 28 primary.

 

Arkansas: Republican incumbent Asa Hutchinson is running for a second term. He won in 2014 with 55.4 percent of the vote. Arkansas has a Republican trifecta.

As of January 1, 2018, no Democrats had pledged to run in the May 22 primary.

 

California: Democratic incumbent Jerry Brown is term-limited out. California has a Democratic trifecta.

At least ten Democrats will run in the June 5 primary, including lieutenant governor Gavin Newsom and former Los Angeles mayor Antonio Villaraigosa.

 

Colorado: Democratic incumbent John Hickenlooper is term-limited out.

At least nine Democrats will run in the June 26 primary, including House Rep Jared Polis.

 

Connecticut: Democratic incumbent Dan Malloy has chosen not to run for a third term. Connecticut has a Democratic trifecta.

At least five Democrats will run in the August 14 primary.

 

Florida: Republican incumbent Rick Scott is term-limited out. Florida has a Republican trifecta.

At least seven Democrats will run in the August 28 primary.

 

Georgia: Republican incumbent Nathan Deal is term-limited out. Georgia has a Republican trifecta.

At least two Democrats, including Stacey Abrams, will appear in the May 22 primary.

 

Hawaii: Democratic incumbent David Ige will run for a second term. In 2014 he won with 49.5 percent of the vote; his nearest competitor got 37.1 percent. Hawaii has a Democratic trifecta.

At least two other Democrats will meet Ige in the August 11 primary.

 

Idaho: Republican incumbent Butch Otter chose not to run for a fourth term. Idaho has a Republican trifecta.

At least three Democrats will run in the May 15 primary.

 

Illinois: Republican incumbent Bruce Rauner will run for a second term. He won in 2014 with 50.3 percent of the vote, four points ahead of his Democratic rival.

At least seven Democrats will run in the March 20 primary, including Chris Kennedy and J. B. Pritzker.

 

Iowa: Republican incumbent Kim Reynolds will run for her first full term. She was sworn in in May 2017 when the sitting governor, Terry Branstad, became the U.S. ambassador to China. In 2014, running as lieutenant governor alongside Branstad, the two drew 59 percent of the vote to the Democrats’ 37.3 percent. Iowa has a Republican trifecta.

At least eight Democrats will run in the June 5 primary, including physician and former Iowa Democratic Party chairwoman Andrea “Andy” McGuire.

 

Kansas: Republican incumbent Sam Brownback is term-limited out. Kansas has a Republican trifecta.

At least seven Democrats will run in the August 7 primary.

 

Maine: Republican incumbent Paul LePage is term-limited out.

At least 13–yes, you read that right, 13–Democrats will run in the June 12 primary.

 

Maryland: Republican incumbent Larry Hogan is running for his second term. He won in 2014 with 51 percent of the vote; the Democrats got 47.2 percent.

At least nine Democrats, including former NAACP president and CEO Ben Jealous, will run in the June 26 primary.

 

Massachusetts: Republican incumbent Charlie Baker is running for his second term. In 2014, he won with 48.4 percent of the vote to the Democrats’ 46.5 percent. He might do better this time around; he has the highest popularity ratings of any sitting governor in America.

At least three Democrats, including Newton Mayor Setti Warren (no relation to Elizabeth Warren), will run in the September 18 primary.

 

Michigan: Republican incumbent Rick Snyder is term-limited out. Michigan has a Republican trifecta.

At least eight Democrats will run in the August 7 primary.

 

Minnesota: Democratic incumbent Mark Dayton declined to run for a third term. Minnesota has a Democratic trifecta.

At least six Democrats will run in the August 14 primary.

 

Nebraska: Republican incumbent Pete Ricketts is running for a second term. In 2014, he won with 57.2 percent of the vote to the Democrats’ 39.3 percent. Nebraska has a Republican trifecta.

As of January 1, 2018, no Democrats had signed up for the May 15 primary.

 

Nevada: Republican incumbent Brian Sandoval is term-limited out.

At least three Democrats will appear in the June 12 primary.

 

New Hampshire: Republican incumbent Chris Sununu will run for a second term. In 2016, he won with 48.8 percent of the vote; his Democratic competitor got 46.9 percent. The state has a Republican trifecta.

At least one Democrat, former Portsmouth mayor Steve Marchand, will run in the September 11 primary.

 

New Mexico: Republican incumbent Susana Martinez is term-limited out.

At least four Democrats will run in the June 5 primary.

 

New York: Democratic incumbent Andrew Cuomo will run for a third term. He won the 2014 election handily, getting 54.3 percent of the vote to the Republicans’ 40.3 percent.

As of January 1, 2018, no other Democrats had announced they would run in the September 11 primary.

 

Ohio: Republican incumbent John Kasich is term-limited out. Ohio has a Republican trifecta.

At least six Democrats will run in the May 8 primary, including Richard Cordray, former head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau.

 

Oklahoma: Republican incumbent Mary Fallin is term-limited out. Oklahoma has a Republican trifecta.

At least three Democrats will appear in the June 26 primary.

 

Oregon: Democratic incumbent Kate Brown will run for her first full term after being appointed in February 2015 and winning a special election in 2016. The previous governor, Democrat John Kitzhaber, resigned over an ethics scandal. In her 2016 race, she garnered 50.7 percent of the vote. Her nearest rival, the Republican, got 43.5 percent.

As of January 1, 2018, no other Democrats had agreed to appear in the May 15 primary.

 

Pennsylvania: Democratic incumbent Tom Wolf will run for his second term. He won his first decisively in 2014, getting 54.9 percent of the vote to the Republicans’ 45.1 percent.

As of January 1, 2018, no other Democrats had agreed to appear in the May 15 primary.

 

Rhode Island: As of January 1, 2018, Democratic incumbent Gina Raimondo had not yet decided if she’ll run for a second term. Rhode Island has a Democratic trifecta. In 2014, she pulled in 40.7 percent of the vote. Her nearest competitor, a Republican, got 36.2 percent.

If she runs, Raimondo will meet at least two other Democrats in the September 12 primary.

 

South Carolina: Republican incumbent Henry McMaster will run for his first full term after being appointed in 2017 when Nikki Haley left to serve as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. South Carolina has a Republican trifecta.

At least three Democrats have committed to the June 12 primary.

 

South Dakota: Republican incumbent Dennis Daugaard is term-limited out. South Dakota has a Republican trifecta.

At least one Democrat, state Senator Billie Sutton, has signed up for the June 5 primary.

 

Tennessee: Republican incumbent Bill Haslam is term-limited out. Tennessee has a Republican trifecta.

At least two Democrats will run in the August 2 primary.

 

Texas: Republican incumbent Greg Abbott will run for a second term. He won decisively in 2014, getting 59.3 percent of the vote to Democrat Wendy Davis’s 38.9 percent. Texas has a Republican trifecta.

A total of ten Democrats have committed to the March 6 primary.

 

Vermont: As of January 1, 2018, Republican incumbent Phillip Scott had not decided if he would run for a second term. In 2016, he received 52.9 percent of the vote to the Democrats’ 44.2 percent.

At least two Democrats will run in the August 14 primary.

 

Wisconsin: Republican incumbent Scott Walker will run for a third term. In 2014, he won 52.3 percent of the vote to the Democrats’ 46.6 percent. Wisconsin has a Republican trifecta.

Wow! At least 14 Democrats will face off in the August 14 primary.

 

Wyoming: Republican incumbent Matt Mead is term-limited out. Wyoming has a Republican trifecta.

At least one Democrat, former state Rep. Mary Throne, will appear in the August 21 primary.

 

Check out Ballotpedia’s page on the 2018 gubernatorial races:

https://ballotpedia.org/Gubernatorial_elections,_2018

 

Donate to Ballotpedia ($18 corresponds to the cost of writing a single article):

https://ballotpedia.org/Ballotpedia:Donate

 

Like Ballotpedia on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Ballotpedia?ref=br_tf

 

Follow Ballotpedia on Twitter:

@ballotpedia

 

Read a November 2016 Politico story on how Democrats hope to make pickups in gubernatorial races:

https://www.politico.com/story/2016/11/2018-governors-races-democrats-231815

 

Read a July 2017 New York magazine story on the same topic:

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2017/07/democrats-could-make-major-gains-in-governorships-in-2018.html

 

Uncategorized

Learn to Welcome Others to the Movement, Period, Full Stop

This OTYCD entry originally posted in April 2017.

Learn to welcome others to the movement, period, full stop.

In November 2016, New York magazine published a fascinating article that didn’t get the recognition it deserved. Titled Why Some Protests Succeed While Others Fail and filed under its Science of Us blog, the story contained mind-blowing revelations about how best to cultivate and direct the anti-Trump energy that arose after the election.

http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2016/11/how-should-trump-protesters-organize-themselves.html

First, let’s list the takeaways from the piece, as identified by the writer, Jesse Singal. These boil down to:

Use Trump to draw people in, but don’t make him your lasting focus. Otherwise, your energy and your momentum will evaporate along with him when he goes.

Welcome everyone who wants to protest with youand make them feel welcome.

Don’t be violent.

The mind-blowing bits appear in the section where Singal discusses the second point, about the value of making people feel welcome. He cites the work of sociologist Ziad Munson, who has studied why people join and become increasingly active in causes such as the pro-life movement. Here are the mind-blowing bits, quoted in full (bold is added by OTYCD):

One of the key things he’s found, over and over and over, is that people often get involved in movements without having particularly strong ideological commitments to them.

Take the anti-abortion activists who were the subject of Munson’s book The Making of Pro-life Activists: How Social Mobilization Works. “I went back and I tried to determine what were their beliefs about abortion the first time they were involved in some kind of pro-life activity,” whether a protest in front of a clinic, the March for Life, or whatever else, he explained. “At that moment, only half of them would have considered themselves pro-life.” Moreover, a quarter “would have openly said they were pro-choice.” So why do they get involved? Someone asks them to. In one instance, for example, a woman’s eventually intense, long-term involvement in anti-abortion causes began simply because her doctor, whom she respected a great deal, asked her to come to an event. Prior to that, it just wasn’t something she had thought of.

Why is this mind-blowing? It shows you how much power you have.

Yes, you.

You’re doing so much good work to push back against Trump. You have one more task to add to your To-Do List: Ask someone to join you in pushing back against Trump.

You don’t have to do it thisverysecond. But you should think about who you want to invite, and when, and what you want to invite them to do.

Maybe you ask them to go to a protest with you. Maybe you ask them to go to a League of Women Voters’ meeting with you. Maybe you ask them to phone-bank for a Democratic candidate with you. Maybe you ask them to go to a member of Congress’s next local town hall meeting with you. Maybe you ask them to write and stamp postcards with you.

Whatever works. Whatever makes sense. Just do it.

Then keep doing it. Keep inviting other people–especially those who like you and trust you–to join you in pushing back against Trump.

Keep doing it until Trump is gone and we’ve cleaned up all the wreckage he’ll leave behind.

Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Uncategorized

Refresh, Review, and Prepare for 2018 (GOP Tax Bill-Related Briefing, Postmortem Edition)

Refresh, review, and prep for 2018.

The tax bill passed both chambers between December 19 and December 20, after some glitches that forced a revote in the House of Representatives.

John McCain did not vote–he had to go home to Arizona to recuperate from complications from his brain cancer treatments. But the yes votes on the final bill included Lisa Murkowski and Susan Collins.

Let’s review what we should do now.

First–Much has been asked of you lately. You have worked hard. If you need a break nowrightnow, take it. If you need to purge politics from your life for a few hours, a few days, a few weeks, do it. Tend to yourself. Do whatever you need to do so you can come back, refreshed and ready to fight. If you can hang on until Congress adjourns on December 22, do. If you feel yourself fraying, step away now, before you have a chance to unravel. Remember, you matter, and your voice matters. We need you to stay here and carry on the fight.

Next, call your MoCs again and either thank them for holding firm against the bill, or berate them for passing it.

Check this New York Times article to see how your House Rep voted (if you have a Republican senator, and that senator isn’t John McCain, your senator voted yes):

Celeste Pewter (@Celeste_Pewter–you’re following her, right?) tweeted the reason why you should make a final call on this topic on December 20:

 

Go call your reps right now, and be ANGRY. You know what happens when people don’t call after contentious votes? We shrug and think, “Ok, what’s next?” But if you call, it forces us to pause and wonder how to address it.

Call your MoCs on this issue last time if you haven’t already. Yes, we know you’re sick of calling about this, and you might be despondent over the passage of the bill. We get it! We’ve been beating the drum about the GOP tax bill since early November. But if the pressure disappears the instant the bill passes, your MoCs might downplay the protests. Force them to pause and wonder how to address it.

Also, it’s perfectly OK to be mad or sad over this, but don’t let your emotions derail you. Put them to use. Again, Celeste Pewter tweets wisdom:

Channel your frustrations into the tax bill into rage right now. Angry tweeting is cathartic, but will not solve anything in the long run. What are actionable steps you’ll take OFF line? Think about it, and do it.

Here also is a string of tweets from Andy Slavitt (@aslavitt):
My view on last night’s tax vote: don’t dwell too long. They think they are just be getting started. 1/
I believe last night’s vote was baked months ago, seen internally to GOPers as necessary for party survival. Collins, Rubio, Flake & Corker vote had more to do with fraternity than ideology. 2/
Negotiating for something for themselves or to show their power was all they ever intended. The fact is they were all crap negotiators but once AL flipped & McCain was hospitalized, demands dropped & everybody fell in line. 3/
The fact that the bill was unpopular was an irritant, that every economist & deficit hawk saw it as a clear disaster just had to be lived with. The prospect of passing no legislation in what felt like a closing window was unacceptable for a simple reason. 4/
It costs $20 million or more to run a Senate race or a competitive House race and those dollars generally don’t come locally and they don’t come without promises. The single fact that 6000 lobbyists worked on the bill is the one I will remember. 5/
The immediate agenda once the tax is signed is all that matters now . . . 6/
CHIP and DACA and the size of zmedicare cuts are immediately on the agenda with the CR coming on Friday. As are the reinsurance and CSR amendments Collins asked for. 7/ [Editor’s note: CHIP is the Children’s Health Insurance Program, which serves more than nine million American children, and has gone unfunded since expiring on September 30; DACA stands for Deferred Action on Childhood Arrivals, a program that helped people who are Americans in every sense except the paperwork; CR stands for ‘continuing resolution,’ a maneuver that will furnish the funds that let the government pay its bills for a set period of time. The current CR expires Friday, December 22; many are urging Democrats to make the next CR contingent on reauthorizing CHIP, protecting the DACA folks, or both.]
GOP has focused so much on the tax bill and so much of that agenda they don’t like that much of it will get kicked to January. The dynamic is horrifying.8/
In the new party roles, anytime something is done for people, Republicans want something in return. Example: CHIP, DACA, Medicare all have price tags on them. Republicans insist on cutting the ACA, a border wall, and Defense spending.9/
And we are weeks for 2018…Republicans are ready to reach for much more. Graham & Cassidy have already begun the process of trying to recruit Collins or Murkowski to do ACA repeal next year. The White House and Paul Ryan promise to cut Medicaid and other poverty programs. 10/
Going into 2017: Most Americans didn’t know what CHIP was until the GOP decided not to pass it; weren’t focused on Medicaid until the GOP tried to slash it; and thought pre-existing condition protections were safe until the GOP tried to end them. It’s different now.

Other things to know:

Most people realize how bad this bill is, and most see how it’s Robin Hood in reverse–not just “liberals”.

See this December 20 tweet from Michael Linden (@michaelslinden), a tax expert:

Honored to be part of a tele-town hall with small business owners hosted by this evening. If this call is any indication, small business owners are super upset about the tax bill. It’s so complicated, and it benefits corporations over them, and they know it.

Also see these articles, which are just a few of many on how bad the bill is:

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/12/18/16782484/gop-tax-bill-cuts-reform-republican

https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2017/12/gop-tax-bill-inequalilty/548726/

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2017/12/20/republicans-are-about-to-pass-a-tax-bill-democrats-think-theyre-signing-their-death-certificate/?utm_term=.9fba711406ca

The team behind the Trump Tax March and Not One Penny are ready with a call to Repeal the Trump Tax:

https://notonepenny.org

https://repealthetrumptax.org

We’ll devote posts to that as they develop, but for now–know that Paul Ryan and his minions plan to cut Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security next.

If they try to do that, they should be met with a loud and forceful response: Repeal the tax cuts you just passed, and apply the money to those programs.

Now, having said all that: It was clear before the bill staggered to the finish line, and it’s clearer now that it has passed:

All Republican senators have to go.

All. Of. Them. Without exception.

Maybe there are some decent ones in the House of Representatives, maybe, but the Senate? They all have to go. All of them.

You now have to start thinking seriously about what you will do to help get all those Republicans out of office.

We’ve wrangled a bunch of links to past posts to cover things you should consider doing, and things you can start doing.

 

First off–if you haven’t seen the page on The Most Important Thing You Can Do, go there and read those four posts. (Yes, there are four Most Important Things You Can Do. #SorryNotSorry.)

https://onethingyoucando.com/the-most-important-thing-you-can-do/

 

Only one-third of the Senate is up for re-election in 2018. Defending Democratic Senators helps the cause just as much as defeating Republican incumbents.

Start scouting for senators who you can donate time and money to in 2018:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/11/23/start-scouting-for-senators-who-you-can-donate-time-and-money-to-in-2018/

 

Also, think about which House of Representatives members to support or oppose in 2018. All of them are up for re-election, and some incumbents are retiring. Watch the Democratic primaries, see who you can get behind, and do it. Again, you need to commit time, money, word-of-mouth support, or some combination of all three.

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/11/20/think-about-which-house-reps-to-support-or-oppose-in-2018/

 

Trump and his minions are going to try everything they can to suppress the vote. Once you are sure you’re registered, and once you’ve started talking to friends who were eligible to vote in 2016 but chose not to do so, look into other ways you can support and defend the right to vote.

 

Support Spread the Vote, which helps citizens obtain IDs and other paperwork they need in order to vote in their home states:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/11/26/support-spread-the-vote-which-helps-citizens-obtain-ids/

 

Support the efforts of Let America Vote:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/11/25/support-the-efforts-of-let-america-vote/

 

Support H.R. 2840, the Automatic Voter Registration Act:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/11/27/support-h-r-2840-the-automatic-voter-registration-act/

 

Help Florida’s ex-felons regain the right to vote:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/11/25/help-floridas-ex-felons-regain-the-right-to-vote/

Uncategorized

Fight the GOP Tax Bill, December 20 Update

This is your December 20 update on fighting the GOP tax bill.

 

So, updates.

 

Late last night, the Senate voted 51-48 for the bill. Of course it was along party lines. They did this without having seated Alabama Senator-elect Doug Jones. They did this without following normal order.

More evidence of how much they flouted normal order came earlier yesterday, when the House of Representatives voted and were told they had to vote again today because they screwed up a few things.

They will vote again this morning, and by ‘morning’ we mean EST.

You can do one more thing right now to fight this tax bill. You can call your House Rep again to ask them to vote no. (Scroll down a smidge for a script.)

Check this New York Times piece to see if your House Rep voted yes on the reconciliation bill yesterday. If they did, give them a piece of your mind (politely). If they didn’t, thank them for voting no.

 

The Republicans are steaming ahead despite the rampant unpopularity of their bill:

http://thehill.com/homenews/senate/365135-democratic-poll-shows-tax-bill-hurts-gop-incumbents

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/12/15/16781952/republican-tax-bill-2018-the-weeds

 

It should be noted that during reconciliation, some of the worst provisions in the GOP tax bill were in fact removed (for which you can thank Democrats, mostly). On December 15, Sahil Kapur (@sahilkapur), a national reporter with Bloomberg, tweeted:

Provisions REMOVED from final tax bill, per Hill sources familiar with it: —

Higher ed tuition waiver tax —

Student loan deduction removal —

Medical expense deduction axing —

Johnson amendment repeal —

Fetal “personhood” language

 

…this doesn’t represent formal confirmation, however, and there are still a lot of bad things in the bill.

 

Today, please call your house rep one last time.

Here are calling scripts from @Celeste_Pewter, who you should be following on Twitter if you aren’t already. There’s one for your House Rep, one for Senators who voted yes, and one for Senators who voted no:

 

 

 

Here are more things you might want to know:

#NotOnePenny has GOP tax bill protests scheduled until December 21 at least. Check this link to find one near you:

https://notonepenny.org/take-action/#events

 

Here also are several other folks aside from @MichaelSLinden, @Celeste_Pewter, @TopherSpiro, and @aslavitt who you should be following on Twitter to stay on top of the GOP tax bill, which is morphing constantly, like a suspect science experiment in a horror movie. Some of these people are old friends from the Trumpcare fights. Some are tax experts.

Ben Wikler @benwikler

Seth Hanlon @sethhanlon

Sunjeev Bery @sunjeevbery

Lily Batchelder @lilybatch

Greg Leiserson @gregleiserson

Chad Bolt @chadderr

 

Here also are two more recent posts that relate to the GOP tax bill and its effects that you should see if you haven’t yet:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/02/refresh-review-and-prep-for-2018-gop-tax-bill-related-briefing/

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/03/commit-now-to-put-any-tax-benefits-you-might-get-from-the-gop-tax-bill-to-fighting-its-effects/

 

One last note, which we’ve stated before: Even if this bill ultimately implodes and never becomes law, we still need to vote out every Republican that we can in 2018. This whole process has been nothing less than legislative malpractice. They should be punished for aiding and abetting it. Period.

Uncategorized

Fight the GOP Tax Bill, December 19 Update: The House of Representatives Votes TODAY (and Maybe the Senate Tonight)

This is your December 19 update on fighting the GOP tax bill.

The House of Representatives is expected to vote TODAY, December 19, on the GOP tax bill.

If you haven’t called yet to say no to it, or haven’t called in a while, at the very least, call your House Rep and voice your opposition.

The Senate could vote on the bill as early as tonight. Celeste Pewter (@Celeste_Pewter) retweeted @NBCPolitics on December 18:

On Senate floor, John Cornyn says Senate could vote on tax reform as early as Tuesday night.

When making your calls (scripts, courtesy of Celeste Pewter, are below), call your House Rep first, then your Senators, then your governor (to ask him or her to voice their opposition to the bill, which will affect the funding their state receives).

 

The Republicans are steaming ahead despite the rampant unpopularity of their bill:

http://thehill.com/homenews/senate/365135-democratic-poll-shows-tax-bill-hurts-gop-incumbents

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/12/15/16781952/republican-tax-bill-2018-the-weeds

 

It should be noted that during reconciliation, some of the worst provisions in the GOP tax bill were in fact removed (for which you can thank Democrats, mostly). On December 15, Sahil Kapur (@sahilkapur), a national reporter with Bloomberg, tweeted:

Provisions REMOVED from final tax bill, per Hill sources familiar with it: —

Higher ed tuition waiver tax —

Student loan deduction removal —

Medical expense deduction axing —

Johnson amendment repeal —

Fetal “personhood” language

 

…this doesn’t represent formal confirmation, however, and there are still a lot of bad things in the bill.

When you make your calls, call your house rep first, and then your senators. And ask your friends and family to call, too.

Here is a calling script for your House Rep and Senators, from @Celeste_Pewter, who you should be following on Twitter if you aren’t already:

Here also is a @Celeste_Pewter script for calling your governor, who will definitely be affected by the tax bill:

 

And here are more things you might want to know:

#NotOnePenny has GOP tax bill protests scheduled until December 21 at least. Check this link to find one near you:

https://notonepenny.org/take-action/#events

 

If you are represented in the senate by Bob Corker of Tennessee or Jeff Flake of Arizona, it’s extra-super-important that you call, or urge friends and family who live there to call, since Susan Collins of Maine said publicly on December 18 that she intended to vote yes.

But again, remember–only call those senators if they represent you personally. Do not call if you don’t live in their states. Their offices won’t listen to you, and you’ll have occupied a line that an actual constituent could use.

 

Here also are several other folks aside from @MichaelSLinden, @Celeste_Pewter, @TopherSpiro, and @aslavitt who you should be following on Twitter to stay on top of the GOP tax bill, which is morphing constantly, like a suspect science experiment in a horror movie. Some of these people are old friends from the Trumpcare fights. Some are tax experts.

Ben Wikler @benwikler

Seth Hanlon @sethhanlon

Sunjeev Bery @sunjeevbery

Lily Batchelder @lilybatch

Greg Leiserson @gregleiserson

Chad Bolt @chadderr

 

Here also are two more recent posts that relate to the GOP tax bill and its effects that you should see if you haven’t yet:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/02/refresh-review-and-prep-for-2018-gop-tax-bill-related-briefing/

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/03/commit-now-to-put-any-tax-benefits-you-might-get-from-the-gop-tax-bill-to-fighting-its-effects/

 

One last note, which we’ve stated before: Even if this bill ultimately implodes and never becomes law, we still need to vote out every Republican that we can in 2018. This whole process has been nothing less than legislative malpractice. They should be punished for aiding and abetting it. Period.

Community Activism · Uncategorized · Voting Rights, Fighting Voter Suppression

Support the Efforts of Let America Vote

This OTYCD entry originally posted in November 2017.

Support the efforts of Let America Vote, which fights attempts to make it harder for Americans to cast a ballot.

It’s disturbing to think that any political party in the United States sees lowering voter turnout as a positive strategy, but that is exactly the current attitude of the GOP. They have noticed that their candidates do better when fewer people come out, and they have pursued policies, such as voter ID legislation, which make it harder for people to vote.

The election of Donald Trump promises to make things worse. Losing the popular vote by three million votes clearly wounded his ego, so much so that on May 11 he launched the Advisory Commission on Election Integrity. Its co-leaders are Vice President Mike Pence and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, a notorious fan of laws that restrict access to the ballot.

We need to push back against voter suppression, hard and often. Two out of five eligible citizens did not vote in November 2016. In order to strengthen democracy and undo the damage of Trump and the Republicans, we need to encourage non-voters to come out and exercise their rights–not just for presidential elections, but for primaries, mid-terms, and special elections. Trump fans and devoted Republicans have no interest in fixing the larger problem. We need to invite and recruit citizens who rarely or never vote.

Let America Vote helps the cause by fighting attempts to make it harder for people to vote. This takes the form of fighting restrictive bills and laws; questioning purges of voter rolls; and fighting those who try to intimidate voters.

 

Visit the Let America Vote page:

https://www.letamericavote.org

 

Learn about restrictive voting laws that might apply in your state:

https://www.letamericavote.org/states/

 

Read Let America Vote’s statement against Republican Karen Handel’s fundraising email that cited her outrage over citizens of Georgia’s 6th District gaining more time to register to vote:

https://www.letamericavote.org/news/2017/jason-kander-statement-karen-handels-outrage-eligible-georgia-voters-allowed-register-vote/

 

Read its statement on Trump’s task force on voter fraud:

https://www.letamericavote.org/news/2017/let-america-vote-statement-executive-order-creating-task-force-investigating-voter-fraud/

 

Like Let America Vote on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/letamericavote/

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@LetAmericaVote

 

Apply to intern with Let America Vote:

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSc8QCrO26Rw_ciCPQSrfNEG8DuCCoZLAASK_ZsCIJ_s1YzAow/viewform

 

Volunteer to help Let America Vote:

https://secure.letamericavote.org/page/s/get-involved

 

Donate to Let America Vote:

https://secure.actblue.com/contribute/page/lav-main?recurring=true

 

Read about Trump’s voter fraud commission, the reputation of Kris Kobach, and the GOP’s inclination to suppress the vote:

http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/politics/2017/05/kris_kobach_is_leading_trump_s_vote_fraud_commission_that_s_terrifying.html

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/features/the-gops-stealth-war-against-voters-w435890

 

 

Action Alerts · Call Your Members of Congress · Elections · House Bills, Federal · Senate Bills, Federal · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms · Uncategorized

Emergency Update Post: Fight the GOP Tax Bill, Still, December 4 Edition

This is an emergency update post on fighting the GOP tax bill from December 2-4, 2017.

So we’ve been telling you to follow @Celeste_Pewter, over and over, for weeks now.

Around noon on December 2, she tweeted a thread of actions that you can take, right now, to fight the GOP tax bill. Yes, it’s passed the Senate, but there’s still time to push back, and we need to push back forcefully and firmly over the next 72 hours.

We are just going to paste her tweets here. We don’t want you to miss any of them. (We didn’t copy over the first as it’s more of a throat-clearer.)

Update, later on December 3: Scroll down for a script from Celeste for calling the governor of your state. The GOP tax bill would remove the SALT deductions, aka State And Local Taxes. Right now, you can deduct them from your federal tax bill. If the GOP has its way, you won’t, and certain blue states will be hit doubly hard by that. Your governor will be alert to this and terrified by it, regardless of her or his party affiliation. It’s worthwhile to call.

Also, here is a Storify link that includes all the tweets below, plus later updates, which you can post to your Facebook page:

https://storify.com/Celeste_pewter/steps-on-how-to-fight-the-tax-bill

And we stress again–if you’re not following @Celeste_Pewter, do it, and follow @roadto2018, which she’s involved with as well.

Read.

Learn.

Act.

NOW.

Thanks.

 

Ok, massive thread coming up. Mute as needed. 1. Yes, it passed the Senate last night. Yes, you should be mad about this. However, this doesn’t mean it’s over. 2. The bill still has to go to conference committee, where they reconcile the House and Senate versions.

3. No, we don’t know if the House is just going to pass the Senate version. It’s possible, but they’ve traditionally been more conservative than the House. Without having a crystal ball in front of me, I believe they’re not going to like the sweeteners in the Senate version.

4. Per CSPAN, the House is going to vote on going to conference on Monday, at approximately 6:00 PM. (This is schedule to change. I’ll update once their calendars update) This means you have about 72 hours to take a stand. So these are your next steps.

5. Begin by calling your Senators, and responding appropriately to however they voted last night. Scripts below for GOP/Dem Senators. Yes, your Dem Senators need to hear from you. Validate what they just did. They worked pretty damn hard against near impossible odds.

6. Then call your House member, and let them know you want them you oppose both versions of the tax bill as it stands. Demand they strip out as many of the egregious amendments as possible.

7. Yes, we’d prefer it if these bills were killed completely. But we need to be prepared that the GOP is desperate, and needs to pass something, anything to run on for 2018. If we can at the VERY LEAST minimize the harm, then it’s still something.
8. Californians, with GOP House members – (Royce, Issa, etc.) – you are critical to this. The tax bill is going to hit California hard, and you need to work that angle for all you have. Do what others can’t do. Work your powers as a constituent.
9. If you’ve called your Senators and your House members, great! Start calling/emailing/Facebooking friends, family, colleagues, and get them to call. Make it easy for them: Give them talking points, numbers and names. The more people you can recruit to call, the better.
10. Grad students and those who will be impacted in specific areas, write OpEds for your local papers, and email them in. You need to drive as much attention to this as possible, and you can also correct misconceptions about the bill(s).

11. Attend a protest in your area. and the team have you covered. If you know of random events taking place, respond to this tweet and hashtag w/ :

13. Use Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, what have you, strictly as a means to share information and empower your followers. It will have zero impact on your electeds. Their social teams will shrug and move on.
14. Yes, calls are best and should be the one mechanism you use this weekend, if possible. I can’t stress how critical and time sensitive this is.

15. Other thing to do: Donate to the Democratic senators who stood AGAINST the tax bill last night, including several who are in very pro-Trump states. If you don’t want scenarios like last night to repeat, we need to hold their seats.

16. But your first donation should be to . There are ten days until the election in Alabama. Any seat removed from the GOP majority will be an achievement for the balance of power. (Google “Douglas Jones Donate” to get resources for this.)

17. Remind everyone that is still ongoing. Get everyone to enroll.

18. Correct misinformation. I’m seeing a lot of misinformation going on about the , from the legislative process, to how much individual taxpayers stand to benefit.

Start here:

19. If you’re an editor/writer who can volunteer your time, reach out to , who is organizing a group to help proof read OpEds before sending them in. That’s it. Get to the phones. If you don’t want our economy to go off a cliff, this weekend is THE weekend to act.
20. One more: please hashtag all of your tweets re: calling your electeds w/ . will boost you. Share tips (e.g. which VM box is full? Who’s picking up?), encourage each other, vent if needed. This is a community. We do this together.
…Got that? Then get on it. And thank you.

And here is the script to use when calling your governor, also courtesy of Celeste:

 

Find the contact info for your governor:

 

https://www.usa.gov/state-governor

 

Here’s a script from Celeste that you can use: