Uncategorized

See Which Companies and Celebrities Are Doing the Right Thing During the COVID-19 Pandemic By Checking the Did They Help? Website

We’re re-running this April 2020 COVID-19-related piece because COVID-19 is Still A Thing and it’s limiting activism pretty sharply. Can’t tell people to leave their houses, for example. Stay alert and stay safe, all. 

 

See which companies and celebrities are doing the right thing during the COVID-19 pandemic by checking the Did They Help? website.

 

Times like these bring out the best, and the worst, in people. A website called Did They Help? lets you track who, and what companies, are doing during the COVID-19 pandemic, so you can offer or withdraw your support accordingly.

 

Did They Help? defines Heroes as “Companies and high profile people who have gone made (sic) positive changes and actions to support employees and society due to the Coronavirus / Covid-19 pandemic”. Zeros, logically enough, are people and companies cited for making negative or counterproductive choices in the context of the pandemic.

 

Its official Heroes include chef José Andrés, creator of the World Central Kitchen nonprofit, which is feeding front-line medical personnel, and also Darden Restaurants, which owns the Olive Garden, Longhorn Steakhouse, and other national chains, for offering paid sick leave to all its employees as well as two weeks of emergency pay for hourly employees.

 

The Zeros list counts chef Gordon Ramsey for laying off 500 workers due to the pandemic, as well as the GameStop video game chain for advising its stores to remain open during state and local lockdowns and asserting that it’s an “essential retailer.”

 

Did They Help? assigns or subtracts points from individuals and companies based on claims that readers send in with relevant backing information, usually in the form of stories published by media outlets.

 

As of early April 2020, the biggest hero on the Did They Help? leaderboard was Target, which earned ten points for raising pay for employees during the pandemic; instituting dedicated shopping hours for vulnerable populations; and letting employees of their headquarters work from home.

 

The biggest zero on the leaderboard was… wait for it… President Donald Trump, with negative seven points.

 

Oddly, those ranked by Did They Help? who earn actual zeros get a rating of “It’s Complicated”, which details how their positive and negative actions have cancelled each other out.

 

See the Did They Help? website (scroll down a little to find the form through which you can make a nomination): https://didtheyhelp.com

 

See its FAQ page, which explains how its team awards and subtracts points: https://didtheyhelp.com/faqs/

 

See its Leaderboard page: https://didtheyhelp.com/leaderboards/

 

Donate to cover Did They Help?’s website-hosting costs: https://didtheyhelp.com/support-donations/

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

Uncategorized

Support Democrat Jaime Harrison’s Campaign to Unseat Republican Senator Lindsey Graham in 2020

This OTYCD post originally appeared in August 2019.

 

Support Democrat Jaime Harrison’s campaign to unseat Republican Senator Lindsey Graham in 2020.

 

Graham is among the most infuriating Republicans in the Senate. He shows periodic flickers of self-awareness, but he never lets that get in the way of his craven pursuit of power. The man who once tweeted, “If we nominate Donald Trump, we will get destroyed……. and we will deserve it,” now golfs with the man on the regular.

 

We need someone to run against this malignant twerp. Jaime Harrison has stepped up.

 

He’s going to need our help. The Cook Political Report rates Lindsey’s seat as Solid Republican.

 

Please consider him for your Core Four for 2020.

 

See Jaime Harrison’s campaign website:

Jaime Harrison for Senate

 

Donate to Harrison’s campaign:

https://secure.actblue.com/donate/ms_harrison_fr_homepage_2019?refcode=MS_HP_FR_X_X_homepage_X__F1_S1_C1__X&recurring=auto&amount=25

 

Sign up to volunteer for Harrison (if you live in North Carolina): https://go.jaimeharrison.com/page/s/volunteer-sign-up?source=MS_HP_FR_X_X_homepage-signup_X__F1_S1_C1__X

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

Like him on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/pg/JaimeHarrisonSC/photos/?tab=album&album_id=328073017309141&ref=page_internal

 

Follow Harrison on Twitter:

@harrisonjaime

 

See Harrison’s Ballotpedia page:

https://ballotpedia.org/Jaime_R._Harrison

Uncategorized

Choose Your Core Four PLUS a Voting Rights Org to Support in 2020

This post originally ran on OTYCD in December 2019. We’re rerunning it at least once a month leading up to the 2020 fall election because Dangit, It’s Important!

 

Choose your Core Four*–two Democratic senators and two Democratic house reps, an incumbent and a challenger for each chamber–to support to in 2020. PLUS, choose a voting rights organization to support as well. 

 

From late 2016 until now, we’ve been going to bat for Democratic candidates in individual special elections. Usually, we’ve supported one Democrat at a time.

 

2018 was a big test of our collective resolve. We did well. The work we put in helped shift control of the House of Representatives to the Democrats. Had we failed, Trump would be steaming ahead unchecked. But we didn’t, and he’s now only the third impeached president in American history. (As of this writing, he is awaiting trial in the Senate.)

 

Literally hundreds of races–35 senators (33 plus two special elections), and all 435 House reps–are taking place, and all of them will end on November 3, 2020.

 

We need to fight to keep control of the House of Representatives (likely, but hey, never treat anything as a certainty), and we have a shot at wresting control of the Senate away from Mitch McConnell and the GOP (tough, but doable).

 

We at OTYCD suggest that you prepare for what’s coming by choosing your “Core Four”–four Democratic candidates who will receive the bulk of your efforts–PLUS an organization that actively supports and defends the right to vote.

 

Your Core Four Plus Should Include:

 

Two Democrats for the House of Representatives.

Two Democrats for the Senate.

One incumbent and one challenger for each chamber of Congress.

AND an organization such as Stacey Abrams’s Fair Fight, Andrew Gillum’s Forward Florida Action, and Flip the Texas House, which Beto O’Rourke is throwing in with.

 

 

How to Pick Your Core Four

 

There’s no right way or wrong way to choose your Core Four, but we suggest starting in your own backyard, with the members of Congress who represent your state.

 

If you don’t know who your members of Congress are, go to this website and plug your street address into the search engine:

whoaremyrepresentatives.org

 

…then research the three names–one House rep and two Senators–that come up.

 

Do you have a good Democratic House Rep? Then embrace him or her.

 

Do you have a lousy House Rep, or is your district’s seat being vacated? Look up the Democratic challengers for the seat and choose one. Look to Ballotpedia.org for help with finding challengers in your federal district.

 

One-third of all senators will be up for re-election in 2020, and there will be two special elections also: One in Arizona, for the seat to which Martha McSally was appointed following the death of John McCain; and one in Georgia, to fill the seat vacated by Johnny Isakson.

 

It’s possible that at least one of your senators (and possibly both) is due to run (but scroll down for a list of states where neither senator has to run).

 

Is one or both of your senators up for re-election? Are they good Dems? If so, embrace them and get behind them.

 

Is your senator who’s running for re-election a lousy senator? Learn about the Democratic challengers for the seat, and be ready to help a challenger however you can. As always, Ballotpedia.org is your friend here.

 

Your help can take the form of time, money, word of mouth, or some combination of the three. But you need to choose your four Democrats, and you need to think seriously about how you will juggle the needs of all four, plus the voting rights organization.

 

You’ll need to sit down and plot this out as you might plot a semester’s course schedule in college. The demands of the four candidates will overlap and they’ll all come due at the same time–in the weeks and days leading up to November 3, 2020. You’ll also have to factor in appointments and life events of your own, too, of course.

 

 

Choosing your Core Four: A Test Case

 

Let’s say you live in California.

 

Your House Rep is up for re-election because they all are. Is yours a good Democrat? Then you have your House incumbent settled.

 

If your House Rep is not a good Democrat, or is a lousy Republican, or is retiring, check Ballotpedia and see who’s challenging for the seat.

 

Let’s assume for the sake of this example that your House Rep is a good Dem. There’s one of your four settled.

 

Now look for a challenger who’s aiming to take a terrible House Republican out.

 

How about Tedra Cobb? She hopes to push freshman House Rep Elise Stefanik out of New York’s 21st Congressional District. Stefanik, you will recall, made a fool of herself by going Full Metal Trumpista during the House of Representatives impeachment inquiry at the tail of 2019. Decent choice. Allocate time and money to Cobb. There. You’ve chosen your two House Dems, one incumbent and one challenger.

 

 

Now turn to the senators. It so happens that neither of the incumbent senators from California are up for re-election in 2020. You are free to devote your resources elsewhere.

 

Doug Jones of Alabama is up in 2020, and he’s regarded as the most vulnerable sitting Democratic Senator. How about you get behind him?

 

Now look for a candidate who hopes to push out a terrible sitting Republican Senator. You’re spoiled for choice here, truly. Maybe consider Jaime Harrison, who’s running against Lindsay Graham in South Carolina.

 

And there’s your Core Four: Your good incumbent Democratic House Rep, Tedra Cobb in New York state, Doug Jones in Alabama, and Jaime Harrison in South Carolina.

 

Of course, you can choose more than four Congressional candidates to back. But the idea here is to help you focus.

 

If you can take on more than four candidates, do it. But four is just enough, in our opinion–more than one, but still a number small enough to count on one hand.

 

Because it’s 2020, and because fighting dirty is kind of the Republican brand now, we’re asking you to pick a Core Four Plus, with the plus being an organization that fights for voting rights. We named three above, but they’re not the only three that are out there. We will devote a separate, periodically updated post that lists voting rights orgs, and we’ll link it here in a few places once it’s ready.

 

You can certainly look to orgs such as Swing Left, Sister District, Emily’s List, and the like to help you make your choices. The main thing is nowrightnow is the time to think seriously about those choices.

 

 

Also, if you live in one of the states listed below, neither of your Senators is up for re-election, and you can devote your resources to incumbents and candidates in other states:

 

California

Connecticut

New York state

Florida

Indiana

Maryland

Missouri

North Dakota

Nevada

Ohio

Pennsylvania

Washington state

Wisconsin

Utah

Vermont

 

* Our ‘Core Four’ only covers federal Congress races. You might have other important races happening at the state and local level–for governor, attorney general, mayor, what have you. Please don’t neglect those races.

 

 

 

See the website for Ballotpedia.org:

https://ballotpedia.org/Main_Page

 

Visit the website of Swing Left, which focuses on taking back the House of Representatives:

https://swingleft.org

 

Visit the website of Sister District, which connects you with districts and regions near you with races that could use your support:

Home

 

Visit the website of Emily’s List, which helps elect pro-choice Democratic women to office:

https://www.emilyslist.org

 

See OTYCD‘s past posts on picking House Reps and Senators to support in 2018, and on starting a 2018 fund:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/09/start-scouting-for-senators-who-you-can-donate-time-and-money-to-in-2018/

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/09/think-about-which-house-reps-to-support-or-oppose-in-2018/

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/09/start-a-2018-fund/

Uncategorized

Are You Registered to Vote? Are You Sure? Better Check.

This OTYCD post has appeared multiple times on the site, and will appear at least once a month until it’s obsolete for 2020. 

 

Are you registered to vote? Are you sure? Like, sure-sure? Hmmm, better check anyway, just to be safe, ahead of the November 3, 2020 vote.

 

You can’t vote in the 2020 primaries or the general election without being registered to vote.

 

Unfortunately, the GOP has gotten into the lousy habit of purging people from voter rolls as a strategy for maintaining power. Maybe not in your home state, but certainly in states they control.

 

If you’re in a Republican-controlled state, or you’re in a 2020 swing state, you might want to check your voter registration periodically in the lead-up to the primaries and the general election in fall 2020.

 

Here’s how to confirm your voter registration status.

 

If you haven’t yet registered, and you’re eligible, here’s how to register to vote. A total of 38 states, plus the District of Columbia, allow you to register to vote online.

 

The broad information on how to register to vote and how to check if you’re still registered comes from USA.gov.

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

Uncategorized

See the Full List of Sitting Senators Who Are Up for Re-election in 2020 (Updated and Expanded in December 2019)

As noted in the title, this version of the OTYCD post appeared in December 2019. We’re rerunning it now because It’s Important, Dangit. 

 

See the full list of sitting senators who are up for re-election in 2020.

 

2018 was a tough year for Democratic sitting Senators. Many more Democrats than Republicans were up for re-election. While we lost two, Bill Nelson of Florida and Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota, we managed to pick up two seats–Jacky Rosen defeated Dean Heller in Nevada, and Kyrsten Sinema won the open seat in Arizona.

 

Things could have been a lot worse, and would have been a lot worse in the absence of voters highly motivated by the unusually terrible performance of the Trump administration. If a more normal and routine Republican had been president in 2018, the Democrats might have suffered more losses.

 

The 2020 story is different. Many more Republicans are defending than are Democrats.

 

This is an expanded version of a basic post first published in April 2019. It flags which Republican Senators have chosen not to run again, and gives additional details on those open seats. It also gives details on select Republican Senators who are regarded as vulnerable to defeat.

 

We at OTYCD are giving these details in part so you can choose candidates for your Core Four Plus for 2020. If you are able to donate to Democratic Senate incumbents or Democratic challengers to incumbent Republican Senators before 2019 ends, please do.

 

The following Democrats are up for re-election in 2020:

 

Cory Booker of New Jersey

 

Christopher Coons of Delaware

 

Richard “Dick” Durbin of Illinois

 

*Doug Jones of Alabama

 

Ed Markey of Massachusetts

 

Jeff Merkley of Oregon

 

Gary Peters of Michigan

 

Jack Reed of Rhode Island

 

*Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire

 

Tina Smith of Minnesota

 

Tom Udall of New Mexico

 

Mark Warner of Virginia

 

*These two Democrats are regarded as the most vulnerable who are up for re-election in 2020. Jones is regarded as the most vulnerable of the pair. Please give them special consideration when choosing your Core Four Plus for 2020.

 

The following Republicans are up for re-election in 2020 (especially vulnerable incumbents are marked with **):

 

Lamar Alexander of Tennessee. Alexander announced in December 2018 that he would not run again. As of December 2019, four Democrats and seven Republicans are competing for the seat. The primary takes place on August 6, 2020.

The Cook Political Report regards the seat as Solid Republican.

 

 

Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia

 

Bill Cassidy of Louisiana

 

 

**Susan Collins of Maine. After much delay, Collins finally announced in December 2019 that she would in fact run again for her Senate seat. After she cast a critical vote that placed Brett Kavanaugh on the Supreme Court of the United States, Ady Barkan’s Be a Hero organization and other Maine activists launched a Crowdpac campaign to raise money for her then as-yet-undeclared Democratic challenger. As of June 2019, they had collected $4 million.

Sara Gideon leads the pack of four Democrats vying to challenge Collins for her seat. The primary takes place on June 9, 2020. Presumably, the winner of the Democratic primary will receive the funds raised through Crowdpac.

The Cook Political Report regards Collins’s seat as a Toss-up.

 

 

John Cornyn of Texas

 

Tom Cotton of Arkansas

 

Steve Daines of Montana

 

Michael Enzi of Wyoming. In May of 2019, Enzi announced he would not run again in 2020. As of December 2019, one Democrat, Yana Ludwig, and three Republicans had committed to run in the August 18, 2020 primary.

The Cook Political Report rates Enzi’s seat as Solid Republican.

 

 

**Joni Ernst of Iowa. She’s running for a second term, but is widely regarded as a vulnerable Republican incumbent. Five Democrats and one other Republican will appear in the June 2, 2020 primary.

The Cook Political Report regards Ernst’s seat as Likely Republican.

 

 

**Cory Gardner of Colorado. Like Ernst, he’s running for a second term. Eight Democrats, including newly-former Governor (he was term-limited out) and newly-former 2020 presidential candidate John Hickenlooper, will be on the June 30, 2020 primary ballot.

The Cook Political Report rates Gardner’s seat as a Toss-up.

 

 

Lindsey Graham of South Carolina. He’s running again, and he has yet to be lumped in with Collins, Ernst, and Gardner, but he might be more vulnerable than he appears. He has a strong Democratic challenger in Jaime Harrison, and a mid-December 2019 poll had him with a two-point lead–within the poll’s 3.1 percent margin of error.

Harrison is one of three other Democrats and five other Republicans challenging Graham in the state’s primary, which takes place on June 9, 2020. If a runoff is required, it will take place on June 23, 2020.

The Cook Political Report rates Graham’s Senate seat as Solid Republican.

 

 

Cindy Hyde-Smith of Mississippi

 

James Inhofe of Oklahoma

 

Mitch McConnell of Kentucky. He’s running again, he leads the GOP Senate majority; and many (including we at OTYCD) agree he’s done as much, if not more, damage to American democracy and the rule of law as has Trump, so we’re including him in this expanded update.

Six Democrats, including Amy McGrath, will appear in the May 19, 2020 primary, along with another Republican.

The Cook Political Report rates McConnell’s seat as Likely Republican, which gives a glimmer of hope. If McConnell was truly well-regarded in his home state, the Cook rating would be the strongest rating, Solid Republican. That said–if you see a poll flying around on social media or the Internet that claims McConnell’s polling numbers in Kentucky are dismal, check the date. The one that pops up most often was taken in summer 2017, which, really, is too old to bother with now.

 

 

David Perdue of Georgia

 

James Risch of Idaho

 

Pat Roberts of Kansas. In January 2019, Roberts announced that he would not run for a fifth term. Four Democrats and seven Republicans, including the loathsome Kris Kobach, will appear on the primary ballot on August 4, 2020.

The Cook Political Report rates the Senate seat as Likely Republican.

 

Mike Rounds of South Dakota

 

 

Ben Sasse of Nebraska. Addressing this now because there might be a little confusion. Sasse has spoken out against Trump, but he IS running for re-election in 2020. Arizona Senator Jeff Flake was the one who spoke out against Trump and decided to quit the Senate.

Sasse is unchallenged by his party in the May 12, 2020 primary. Three Democrats are also running.

The Cook Political Report rates Sasse’s seat as Solid Republican.

 

 

Thom Tillis of North Carolina

 

 

 

See the official list of senators in Class II here:

https://www.senate.gov/senators/Class_II.htm

 

 

We relied on Ballotpedia for several raw facts for this update. It merits your full support.

 

 

See the main Ballotpedia webpage:

https://ballotpedia.org/Main_Page

 

 

Read its Our History page:

https://ballotpedia.org/Our_History

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Read its Contact and FAQ page:

https://ballotpedia.org/Ballotpedia:Overview_and_contact_information

 

 

Subscribe to Ballotpedia’s weekly newsletter, The Federal Tap:

https://ballotpedia.org/The_Federal_Tap:_New_polls_reveal_sizable_lead_in_one_U.S._Senate_race,_tightening_margins_in_another

 

 

Donate to Ballotpedia:

https://ballotpedia.org/Ballotpedia:Donate

 

 

Like the Ballotpedia page on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Ballotpedia/

 

 

Follow Ballotpedia on Twitter:

@ballotpedia

 

Uncategorized

Join Run For Something, And, You Know, Run For Something

This OTYCD post originally appeared in November 2017.

 

Support Run for Something, an organization that recruits people who are under the age of 35 to run for elected office.

 

Look at Congress and an inescapable fact jumps out at you. Most of the members–the good ones and the bad ones–are on the old side. Some are downright elderly. To be fair, age is not, in and of itself, a barrier to holding elected office, nor should it be. But history shows that Congressfolks are all too happy to coast on their momentum as incumbents long after they’ve lost their drive to effectively serve their constituents.

 

Run For Something launched on Inauguration Day 2017. It’s one of many progressive organization that sprung up in the wake of the November 2016 election. Its purpose is to recruit young talent–people aged 35 and younger–to run for elected office as state legislators, mayors, city councilors, and the like. It is dedicated to helping more young people get on the ballot generally, and it hopes to build a progressive farm team of left-leaning political talent.

 

The organization will talk to everyone who fits the profile and expresses interest. It will liaise with similar organizations, such as EMILY’s List, She Should Run, Emerge, the Latino Victory Project, and others. In select cases, it will furnish money and staff.

 

Since we wrote and queued this post, Run For Something proved itself in spectacular fashion on November 8, 2017. It ran 72 candidates in 14 states for state and local races across the country, and 32 of those candidates won. (That number might rise to 34 once recounts in two Virginia House of Delegates races are completed.)

 

Those neophyte candidates backed by Run For Something notched a success rate of more than 40 percent, when 10 percent is far more typical.

 

Its winners included Danica Roem, the transgender woman who defeated a longterm incumbent and an avowed homophobe for a Virginia legislature, and Chris Hurst, a former journalist whose journalist girlfriend was killed live, on-air, by a deranged, armed man. He ran for a Virginia state seat on a gun safety platform and beat a three-time incumbent who was backed by the NRA.

 

Run For Something also supported Ashley Bennett, who got angry when a representative of hers in Atlantic City, N.J., mocked attendees of the Women’s March by wondering if the protest would end in time for them to come home and cook dinner. She ran for his Atlantic County board seat and wrested it away from him.

 

Run For Something is doing powerful work at the most granular level of government–school committees, planning boards, and the like–spotting young, promising talents and building a strong, progressive farm team from which tomorrow’s political stars will come. It deserves your support. And if you’re in its age bracket and you’re thinking about running for office? It needs you, dammit.

 

Visit the Run For Something webpage:

Run For Something

 

Learn about the current slate of Run For Something candidates:

https://www.runforsomething.net/candidates

 

Donate to Run For Something:

https://secure.actblue.com/contribute/page/rfs?refcode=nav

 

Follow Run For Something on Twitter:

@runforsomething

 

Like it on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/runforsomethingpac

 

Read stories about Run For Something and its November 2017 success:

http://time.com/4974562/amanda-litman-run-for-something/

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/page/ct-perspec-page-donald-trump-virginia-northam-danica-roem-gillespie-1113-20171110-story.html

https://www.vox.com/policy-and-politics/2017/11/9/16625966/run-for-something-progressives-local-election-virginia

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

Uncategorized

Support The Lincoln Project, a Group of Never Trump Republicans and Ex-Republicans Who Are Determined to Defeat Trump This Fall

This OTYCD post originally appeared in March 2020.

 

Support The Lincoln Project, a group of never-Trump Republicans and ex-Republicans who have made it their mission to defeat Trump this fall. 

 

We at OTYCD have consistently asked you to consider, and check out, various and sundry folks who we consider sane Republicans.

 

We do this because we know that when it comes to beating Trump, the bigger the coalition, the better. We don’t have to agree with someone 100 percent before we will join forces with them on a specific topic or task.

 

The Lincoln Project combines the efforts of pretty much every never-Trumper of note out there–some you know, some you’ve never heard of.

 

Invoking the name and legacy of the greatest Republican president ever, Abraham Lincoln, the folks behind The Lincoln Project have dedicated themselves to sending Trump packing.

 

From their mission statement: “We do not undertake this task lightly nor from ideological preference. Our many policy differences with national Democrats remain. However, the priority for all patriotic Americans must be a shared fidelity to the Constitution and a commitment to defeat those candidates who have abandoned their constitutional oaths, regardless of party. Electing Democrats who support the Constitution over Republicans who do not is a worthy effort.”

 

One of the ways they choose to fight back is with devastating ads that target GOP Senators who are up for re-election, as well as the actions of Trump himself.

 

While you might not support individual members of The Lincoln Project (and heck, you might absolutely hate some of them), its efforts are worth checking out and encouraging.

 

Obligatory warning, with apologies for bonking you all on the head about this fact: The people who founded The Lincoln Project, and are active in it, hold at least some political beliefs that don’t match yours. That means that sometimes, some of them will say things and do things that might piss you off well and thoroughly. Hell, one of them might have said something bizarre, distasteful, or damn near unspeakable just last week, possibly. That’s ok. Really, it’s OK. You’re being asked to look at what The Lincoln Project is doing and support what you like, not endorse every last little everything that it and each and every one of its members does. The Lincoln Project was launched because its creators understand the danger of Trump–that’s the key thing. One of the reasons this country is so borked right now is we’re fiercely polarized and, in avoiding jerks who disagree with us, we end up avoiding decent people who happen to disagree with us. That’s got to stop if we want to make things better.

 

 

See the main page for The Lincoln Project:

https://lincolnproject.us

 

 

See the op-ed, authored by four members of The Lincoln Project, which was published in the New York Times:

https://lincolnproject.us/news/the-urgency-of-defeating-trump-falls-to-all-of-us/

 

 

Donate to The Lincoln Project:

https://secure.anedot.com/the-lincoln-project/donate

 

 

Like The Lincoln Project on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/thelincolnproject.us

 

 

Follow The Lincoln Project on Twitter:

@ProjectLincoln

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!