Action Alerts · Community Activism · Elections · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Vote with your Dollars

Start a 2018 Fund

This OTYCD entry originally posted in January 2017, but with the mid-terms approaching and the stakes rising, we are reposting past posts that discuss key things you can do to push back against Trump. And yes, even if you only start saving now, and only save $2 per week, it still matters and can still have an effect.

 

Start saving two dollars a week to fund political actions that will shape the 2018 midterms.

 

It doesn’t have to be two dollars. You can save more if you want. If you’re struggling, find a sum you can comfortably set aside, even if it’s just a quarter.

 

If you start saving two dollars per week now, you should have about one hundred set aside when the 2018 primaries crest the horizon.

 

The point is to develop the habit of squirreling away something every week to support your political efforts. You can define ‘political efforts’ as broadly as you wish. You can draw on your stash to donate to Congressional candidates. You can give to Planned Parenthood, Emily’s List, the Sierra Club, the Southern Poverty Law Center, or dozens of other worthy organizations that matter to you. Or you can use it as seed money for your own run for local office.

 

Budget for politics just as you’d budget for Christmas, or tithes, or a down payment on a house. Think long-term. Put away something every week, no matter how small.

 

 

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Community Activism · Elections · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Smoke Out Your Friends Who Didn’t Vote Last Year, and Cultivate Them

This OTYCD entry originally posted in April 2017, but with the mid-terms approaching and the stakes rising, we are reposting past posts that discuss key things you can do to push back against Trump.

 

Start a slow, quiet campaign to identify your friends who didn’t vote for president last November, and cultivate them with an eye toward getting them to the polls in 2018 and 2020.

 

One of the more shocking facts from the 2016 election was how few people voted. According to numbers from the United States Election Project, 59.3 percent of eligible voters turned out and cast a ballot for the president. (60 percent showed up and voted for something; the 0.7 percent gap represents people who voted but did not vote for president.)

 

That’s stupid-crazy low for an advanced democracy like America’s. Pitiable, in fact. Yet it’s actually a better turnout than 2012, which tallied 58.6 percent of eligible voters, and it might be the best electoral turnout recorded between 1972 and 2000.

 

Voter turnout needs to improve. Two out of five eligible voters stayed home. If more of those abstainers had come out, we might not be in the mess we’re in today. If you’re mad at Clinton’s narrow loss to Trump, don’t vent your rage on people who voted for Jill Stein and Gary Johnson–at least they went to the polls. Point your ire at the 40 percent of voters who never made it.

 

Ok, we’re joking about that–don’t actually get mad at them. At least some wanted to cast a ballot, but could not. That said, we’re on watch for articles that explain why people who can vote don’t vote, and why they say they chose to stay home in 2016. When we find them, we’ll post about them.

 

Here’s what we know right now. According to 538, voters who stayed home in 2016 probably cost Clinton the election:

https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/registered-voters-who-stayed-home-probably-cost-clinton-the-election/

 

In particular, turnout was low among young people (aged 18-29) and non-whites.

 

The silver lining to this? We know that Democratic-leaning and left-leaning people were less likely to go to the polls. You, personally, can help fix that.

 

Think about your friends. Do you know who among them did not vote? The math says that you probably have at least some non-voters in your midst. Maybe more than 60 percent of your friends voted, but not all of them.

 

If you know which of your friends did not vote, look for opportunities to discuss it with them. Don’t do this in a punitive way! Simply ask if they voted, and if they say no, ask why. Keep your tone of voice neutral.

 

If it’s something as simple as not being registered, or not having a ride to the polls, do what you can to remove those obstacles. The web site below will tell your friend if they’re registered to vote in their state:

http://www.canivote.org

 

If they are not registered, do what you can to help them register. If they would have voted if they had had transportation to the polls, make plans for 2018–see if you can give them a ride personally, or arrange for a cab.

 

If they had other reasons for not voting–they don’t think their vote matters, they didn’t like the candidates, they don’t trust the system, etc.–just keep talking to them. Don’t always talk politics–see to it that about 80 percent of the time, you talk about something else. And when you do talk politics, only occasionally talk about voting.

 

Build and strengthen your relationship with your non-voting friends with an eye on the coming 2018 race, and with the hopes of enticing those people to come with you to vote in the midterms.

 

 

See the full 2016 election numbers, compiled by the United States Election Project. It includes grand totals and state-by-state breakdowns:

http://www.electproject.org/2016g

 

 

Bookmark this page from the ElectProject site, which lists links to the boards of elections for all 50 states and the District of Columbia (scroll down a bit):

http://www.electproject.org/useful-election-links

 

 

See a 2012 piece on 538 that gives numbers on the 2012 turnout:

https://fivethirtyeight.com/features/no-voter-turnout-wasnt-way-down-from-2012/

 

 

Follow professor Michael P McDonald, the polysci guy behind the United States Election Project, on Twitter:

@ElectProject

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

Action Alerts · Candidates · Choose Your Core Four · Elections · Vote with your Dollars

Support Dr. Hans Keirstead, Who’s Aiming for Dana Rohrabacher’s California House Seat (Update, June 24, 2018)

This OTYCD entry originally posted in July 2017.

 

Update, June 24, 2018: More than two weeks after the June 5, 2018 primary, California’s 48th District finished its count. It was clear pretty soon after the election that Keirstead or Harley Rouda would get the second slot in the top-two primary, it was just a matter of who. In the end, Rouda bested Keirstead by just 126 votes.

We thank Keirstead for running and we hope he’ll run for public office again in the future.

 

Support Dr. Hans Keirstead, a stem cell researcher, entrepreneur, and former professor who is aiming to unseat House Republican Dana Rohrabacher.

 

Canadian-born Keirstead, 50, founded California Stem Cell Inc. and sold it for $100 million in 2014. He is now CEO of Aivita Biomedical. He taught at the University of California, Irvine for 14 years, and has raised well over $100 million in grants and donations in his various scientific jobs. He becomes the fifth Democrat hoping to push out Rohrabacher, who has served as a California house rep for for almost 30 years.

 

Keirstead supports the ACA, and he specifically supports it over a single-payer system. He says he does not intend to use his own money to campaign for the house seat.

 

Under his Why I’m Running essay on his campaign site, he says:

“I’ve dedicated my life to using medical science to save and improve lives — but in Congress, medicine and science have been pushed to the side in favor of partisan political games. Politicians like Dana Rohrabacher have used the broken system for their own gain for far too long. We’re not his priority and we need someone new.

 

I believe our elected leaders should rely on facts to guide policy. I’m not daunted by large obstacles. I’ve launched and managed companies, developed treatments for previously un-treatable diseases and been held accountable for my actions. We need more of that to change Washington and I intend to use Congress as a platform to improve even more lives.”

 

House Rep Dana Rohrbacher is viewed as vulnerable for his pro-Russia stance, and because his district is showing signs of turning Democrat blue. In the 2016 election, Hillary Clinton won the district by less than two points, becoming the first Democratic presidential candidate to win Orange County in 80 years. Rohrbacher also supports the AHCA and questions whether human activity is causing climate change. This is galling on its face, but it’s made worse by the fact that he sits on the House Committee on Science and Technology.

 

 

Visit Keirstead’s campaign website:

http://hansforca.com/home/

 

 

Read his website biography:

http://hansforca.com/about-dr-keirstead/

 

 

Consider Keirstead for your Core Four for 2018:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/24/choose-your-core-four-for-2018/

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Read his full Why I’m Running statement:

http://hansforca.com/why-im-running/

 

 

Read more about Keirstead and his campaign for the House of Representatives:

http://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/337945-stem-cell-scientist-joins-crowded-field-to-unseat-vulnerable-california

http://www.latimes.com/politics/la-pol-ca-house-challenger-20170615-story.html

http://www.ocregister.com/2017/06/15/stem-cell-pioneer-to-challenge-rep-dana-rohrabacher/

http://www.orangecoast.com/features/stem-cell-rock-star/

 

 

Follow Dr. Keirstead on Twitter:

@drhanskeirstead

 

 

Donate to his campaign:

https://secure.actblue.com/donate/keirstead_video

 

 

Don’t believe Dana Rohrbacher is on the House Committee on Science and Technology? Here’s the proof:

https://rohrabacher.house.gov/legislation/committees-and-caucuses

 

 

Here’s a Politico story about Rohrbacher’s interest in Russia, titled Putin’s Favorite Congressman:

http://www.politico.com/story/2016/11/putin-congress-rohrabacher-trump-231775

 

 

And here’s a New York Times story about how the FBI warned Rohrbacher in 2012 that Russian spies were trying to recruit him:

 

Special thanks to 314 Action, where we first learned about Keirstead’s campaign. 314 Action is a nonprofit devoted to electing more people with STEM backgrounds to high office.

Follow it on Twitter: @314Action

Choose Your Core Four · Elections

Support Democrat Marge Doyle, Who Is Running for a House Seat in California’s 8th District (Update June 23, 2018)

Update, June 23, 2018: Doyle came third in the top-two primary held on June 5, 2018. We thank Doyle for running and we hope she’ll run for office again in the future.

 

Support Democrat and registered nurse (RN) Marge Doyle, who is running for a House of Representatives seat in California’s 8th District in 2018. Put Marge in charge!

 

Normally around this point in the post we’d give the candidate’s biography, but instead, we’re going to quote a section from a Q&A interview Doyle did with Tech Solidarity, because it’s damn near impossible to compete with the radiant authenticity of her own words:

 

“Q: What was the moment that made you decide that something had to change, and that you needed to run for Congress?

Doyle: After the November election, I realized that health care would be under threat. As a nurse since I was 22 years old, and working within health care and health care leadership, I thought there was an opportunity for me to work with my representative [incumbent Republican House Representative Paul Cook], and maybe make a change to help the ACA work better. So I prepared a plan that spoke to that, and made an appointment with our representative, and gave him that plan.

It wasn’t just a plan to fix the parts that are problematic, but it was also a plan of how to pay for that. It wasn’t willy-nilly, pie in the sky; I have almost 40 years of healthcare management experience. I kind of know this stuff.

Q: So you wrote ‘Margecare’!

Exactly! I wrote ways to fix our current system, because it needs to be fixed. And I gave it to him. I met with him, I showed him what I suggested, he nodded and sent me on my way. I was a little disappointed that I didn’t get any buy-in, but the night before the bill was supposed to go to Congress, his staff called me and asked me to analyze the bill. I thought, ‘Wow, maybe that really did do some good.’

So I analyzed the bill point by point by point. This was prior to the CBO analysis, and the conclusion was that it didn’t cover more people, and didn’t save any money. And therefore I recommended that he vote ‘no’.

He voted ‘yes’.

I saw him in the area a few weeks later, and I said, ‘you know, I’m still mad at you about your vote.’ And he said ‘it doesn’t matter. The Senate will fix it.’

It was at that point that I realized, if he doesn’t think that his vote matters, he must be replaced. Because his vote would have taken away health care for a hundred thousand people in this district. And that matters. That matters a lot.

I was supporting my friend and her candidacy to replace him, because I knew she supported the kinds of things I was talking about, and she dropped out for family reasons. I couldn’t just let him have this district. I couldn’t let him not care about the hundred thousand people whose lives would be at risk. I couldn’t let him, who flip-flopped on Cadiz, take Cadiz and ruin our desert [scroll down for a link that explains this reference]. I just couldn’t do it.

So that’s why I’m running.”

 

Doyle faces an uphill battle for California’s 8th District. Cook, the three-term Republican incumbent, won in 2016 with two-thirds of the vote.

 

Also, California relies on a Top-two primary system, in which the top two vote-getters advance to the general election. Cook will almost certainly win one of those slots. Doyle must defeat Democrat Ronald O’Donnell and Republican Tim Donnelly for the other. The primary will take place on June 5, 2018.

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

See Doyle’s campaign website:

https://margedoyleforcongress.com

 

 

See her Meet Marge page:

https://margedoyleforcongress.com/#meet-marge

 

 

See her Issues page:

https://margedoyleforcongress.com/platform/

 

 

Choose Doyle for your Core Four:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/24/choose-your-core-four-for-2018/

 

 

Donate to Doyle’s campaign:

https://secure.actblue.com/donate/marge-doyle-for-congress-1

 

 

Like her on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Marge4Congress/

 

 

Follow her on Twitter:

@Marge4Congress

 

 

 

Read a November 2017 interview that Tech Solidarity did with Doyle, from which we quoted above:

https://techsolidarity.org/resources/marge_doyle_interview.html

 

 

See an August 2017 article that incumbent Republican California House Rep Paul Cook wrote about the Cadiz water project, which Doyle references in the quote:

https://www.dailynews.com/2017/08/29/californians-should-support-the-cadiz-water-project-tony-cardenas-and-paul-cook/

Candidates · Community Activism · Elections · Ethics · Health Care

Learn Which 30 State Attorneys General Are On the Ballot In 2018 — UPDATED June 9 So You Can Vote Out the Bums Trying to Hurt People Who Have Pre-Existing Conditions

Learn which 30 state attorneys general are on the ballot in 2018, so you can vote out the state AGs who are attacking the 130 million Americans who have pre-existing conditions, and so you can support the state AGs who are defending those vulnerable people. 

 

The attorney general (AG) is the state’s lead legal officer. State AGs have been crucial to curtailing and/or stopping the agenda of Trump and his cabinet. Several banded together to sue when Trump tried to implement his various Muslim travel bans, and they banded together to sue when Department of Education head Betsy DeVos tried to roll back protections for student borrowers who were cheated by for-profit schools.

 

The state AG is often, but not always, an elected position. In some states, the governor appoints the AG instead.

 

AGs can form part of a triplex–a situation in which the governor, the attorney general, and the secretary of state all belong to the same party. This is distinct from a trifecta, in which the governor and both chambers of the state legislature belong to the same party. In either case, when the three posts yield a triplex, it can be easier for party officials to impose their agenda. As of January 1, 2018, there are 23 Republican triplexes and 11 Democratic triplexes.

 

Below is a list of state AG posts that are open in 2018, with notes on whether the incumbents will run or not.

 

 

Update, June 9, 2018: By now you have heard about the insane response from the Department of Justice (DOJ) to a goofy lawsuit from several state attorneys general that would kill the ACA and end up removing protections that ensure that people with pre-existing conditions can get health insurance.

 

A total of 20 state AGs are suing to kill the Affordable Care Act (ACA), also known as Obamacare, and the vital protections it enshrines. As of now, 16 state AGs and the AG for the District of Columbia have countersued to defend the ACA.

 

We have updated our April 2018 post on which states are holding AG elections in 2018, and we are identifying whether the incumbents are defending the ACA or trying to destroy it. We’re also identifying states that have not entered either lawsuit, and naming Democratic incumbents and challengers who you can nudge to join the 17 who are fighting for the ACA.

 

There’s been a lot of attention to the 2018 Congressional races, and there should be. But please don’t neglect state-level races such as these. Attorneys general have been a valuable force for defending against the horrors of the Trump administration. Please reward and support those who are fighting back, and vote out those who are not.

 

As with the Congressional races, all of the state attorney general elections take place on Tuesday, November 6, 2018.

 

 

Alabama: Republican incumbent Steve Marshall will run for his first full term. He was appointed in 2017 after Republican Luther Strange was appointed to fill the Alabama Senate seat vacated by Jeff Sessions. Alabama has a Republican triplex.

At least one Democrat, Chris Christie (yes, that’s his name, and yes, he’s a different guy than the outgoing New Jersey governor), will appear in the June 5 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Alabama is one of the 20 states suing to destroy the ACA.

Democrat Joseph Siegelman defeated Chris Christie in the June 5 primary. Siegelman is the son of a former Alabama governor and AG who was charged and ultimately served time for corruption and obstruction of justice charges.

He has never run for public office before. He does not appear to have made a statement about the anti-ACA lawsuit, but he has spoken about fighting the opioid epidemic, and he has generally expressed a commitment to defending vulnerable people.

See Democrat Joseph Siegelman’s website and donate to his campaign: https://www.siegelman2018.com

Follow him on Twitter: @JoeSiegelman

 

 

 

Arizona: As of January 1, 2018, Republican incumbent Mark Brnovich had not decided if he would run for a second term. Arizona has a Republican triplex.

At least one Democrat, January Contreras, will run in the August 28 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Arizona is one of the 20 states suing to destroy the ACA.

Brnovich appears to be running again. Contreras is his Democratic opponent. She does not appear to have made a statement about the anti-ACA lawsuit, but we can tell from her website that she’d be joining the 17 if she was in charge.

See Democrat January Contreras’s website and donate to her campaign: https://www.januaryforaz.com

Follow her on Twitter: @JanuaryAZ

 

 

 

Arkansas: Republican incumbent Leslie Rutledge will run for a second term. Arkansas has a Republican triplex.

As of January 1, 2018, no Democrats had signed up for the May 22 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Arkansas is one of the 20 states suing to destroy the ACA.

Fortunately, since we wrote this post, a Democrat joined the race: Mike Lee. While he has not made a specific public comment about the anti-ACA suit joined by his opponent, it’s clear from his website that he’d oppose it.

 

See Democrat Mike Lee’s website and donate to his campaign: http://electmikelee.org

Follow him on Twitter: @ElectMikeLee

 

 

 

California: Democratic incumbent Xavier Becerra will run for his first full term. He was appointed in January 2017 after then-AG Kamala Harris won a California Senate seat in 2016. California has a Democratic triplex.

California uses a top-two primary system for its AG race, which sends the top two vote-getters in the June 5 primary to face each other in the general election. As of January 1, 2018, one other Democrat and two Republicans had committed to the primary.

 

Update, June 2018: California is one of the 17 states countersuing to defend the ACA. Becerra is leading the charge.

Becerra won his June 5 party primary and will face opposition in the fall.

See Xavier Becerra’s website:

https://xavierbecerra.com

Follow him on Twitter:

@XavierBecerra

 

 

 

Colorado: Republican incumbent Cynthia Coffman is leaving the AG post to run for governor.

At least five Democrats will run in the June 26 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Colorado has not joined either of the lawsuits. Ballotpedia shows that the Democratic AG primary field is down to two: Joseph Salazar and Phil Weiser.

Neither candidate appears to have made a public statement about joining the countersuit. Neither devotes an explicit heading to the ACA in the issues section of their campaign sites, but Weiser published a blog post in May 2018 about fighting for affordable, accessible health care.

See Phil Weiser’s website and donate to his campaign: https://www.philforcolorado.com

Follow Weiser on Twitter: @pweiser

See Joe Salazar’s website and donate to his campaign: https://salazarforcoag.com

 

 

 

Connecticut: Democratic incumbent George C. Jepsen has chosen not to run for a third term. Connecticut has a Democratic triplex.

At least one Democrat, former federal prosecutor Chris Mattei, has committed to run in the August 14 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Connecticut is one of the 17 states countersuing to defend the ACA. 

On June 8, Chris Mattei tweeted in favor of the countersuit:

The DOJ, which should be a refuge for the exploited & powerless, just argued in court that 52 million people w/ pre-existing conditions can be denied coverage contrary to the ACA. This is disgusting. This is not justice.

See Chris Mattei’s website and donate to his campaign: https://matteiforct.com

Follow him on Twitter: @ChrisMatteiCT

 

Mattei has since been joined in the August 14 Democratic primary by Paul R. Doyle and William Tong.

Weirdly, Doyle’s webpage isn’t loading at the moment; we’ll update this post accordingly when it is.

 

Tong has not given a statement about the countersuit but his campaign site is dead clear that he does not like what Trump is doing in general, and will resist his agenda.

See William Tong’s website and donate to his campaign: http://www.williamtong.com

Follow him on Twitter: @WilliamTongCT

 

 

 

Delaware: Democratic incumbent Matthew Denn has chosen not to run for a second term. Delaware has a Democratic triplex.

At least one Democrat, Tim Mullaney, will run in the September 11, 2018 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Delaware is one of the 17 states countersuing to defend the ACA. 

Mullaney has since been joined in the party primary by Kathy Jennings, Chris Johnson, and LaKresha Roberts.

Weirdly, Mullaney does not appear to have a campaign site right now, just a Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/Mullaney-2018-1716354568406764/

If we find a website or Twitter handle for him, we’ll update accordingly.

 

Jennings has not made a statement in favor of the countersuit, but it’s reasonable to infer from her website and Twitter feed that she supports it.

See Kathy Jennings’s website and donate to her campaign: https://www.kathyfordelaware.com/priorities

Follow her on Twitter: @KathyForAG

 

Like Jennings, Johnson has not made a specific statement about the countersuit, but it’s reasonable to infer from his website and Twitter feed that he supports it.

See Chris Johnson’s website and donate to his campaign:

https://www.chrisjohnsonforag.com

Follow him on Twitter:

@ChrisJohnsonDE

 

Roberts is in the same boat as her Democratic rivals: Hasn’t made a statement about the countersuit, but would clearly support it.

See LaKresha Roberts’s website and donate to her campaign:

http://www.lakreshafordelaware.com

Follow her on Twitter: @lakreshaforDE

 

 

 

Florida: Republican incumbent Pam Bondi is term-limited out. Florida has a Republican triplex.

At least one Democrat, Ryan Torrens, will appear in the August 28 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Florida is one of the 20 states suing to destroy the ACA.

Torrens has since been joined in the primary by Sean Shaw, and there’s still time for other Floridians to jump in to the state attorney general race; the filing deadline is June 22, 2018.

 

Torrens has not made a specific statement against the anti-ACA suit, but a look over his website leaves no doubt that he’s not in favor.

See Torres’s website and donate to his campaign: https://www.ryanforattorneygeneral.com

Follow him on Twitter: @RyanforFLAG

 

Ditto for Sean Shaw: No specific comment on the suit, but judging by his website and Twitter feed, we doubt he supports it.

See Shaw’s website and donate to his campaign: https://seanshaw.com

Follow him on Twitter: @SShawFL

 

 

 

Georgia: Republican incumbent Chris Carr will run for his first full term as AG. He was appointed in October 2016 after Republican Samuel S. Owens resigned to take the presidency of Kennesaw State University.

As of January 1, 2018, no Democrats had committed to the May 22 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Georgia is one of the 20 states suing to destroy the ACA.

A Democrat has since stepped up to challenge Carr: Charlie Bailey.

Bailey hasn’t made a public comment about the lawsuit, but he’s endorsed by the Democratic Attorneys General Association, which is promising, seeing as it’s Democratic AGs who are pressing the countersuit.

See Charlie Bailey’s website and donate to his campaign: https://charlieforgeorgia.com/home/

Follow him on Twitter: @charlie4georgia

 

 

 

Idaho: Republican incumbent Lawrence Wasden will run for a fourth term as AG. Idaho has a Republican triplex.

As of January 1, 2018, no Democrats had committed to the May 15 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Idaho has not joined either of the lawsuits.

A Democrat, Bruce Bistline, has since joined the AG race, but the Idaho situation seems weird. We found a 2014 (repeat, this is NOT A CURRENT ARTICLE) story online that stated that Bistline would not campaign actively. He appears to be doing the same this time around, too, but he hasn’t said as much to the local press.

Ballotpedia definitely lists Bistline as the Democratic AG candidate for 2018, but we can’t find anything that looks like a campaign website for him. The National Association of Attorneys General confirms that as of May 25, 2018, Bistline did not have one.

The filing deadline to run was back in March, so it’s too late for the Dems to choose someone else.

We get that Idaho is a pretty damn red state. But c’mon, Idaho friends, could you at least pick a Democratic AG candidate who will actually, you know, show up and put up a fight? We at OTYCD think that y’all can do better than Bistline.

 

 

 

Illinois: Democratic incumbent Lisa Madigan decided not to run for a fifth term as AG.

At least eight Democrats will run in the March 20 primary, including Renato Mariotti.

 

Update, June 2018: Illinois is one of the 17 states countersuing to defend the ACA. 

Kwame Raoul emerged victorious from the Democratic primary. (Sorry, Renato. We still love you and we still want people to follow your Twitter feed.)

 

On June 9, Raoul tweeted in favor of the countersuit:

As the son of a community physician and a cancer survior myself, I believe everyone should have access to health care, regardless of income or pre-existing conditions. If Donald Trump won’t enforce the law and protect people, as attorney general, I will.

And he released the same statement as a press release:

https://kwameraoul.com/news/raoul-responds-to-trump-effort-to-gut-the-aca/

 

See Raoul’s website and donate to his campaign: https://kwameraoul.com

Follow him on Twitter: @KwameRaoul

 

 

 

Iowa: Democratic incumbent Tom Miller will run for his tenth term in office. He held the post from 1978 to 1990, when he stepped away to run for governor. He lost, ran for AG in 1994, and has successfully held the office ever since.

As of January 1, 2018, no Democrats had committed to the June 5 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Iowa has not joined either of the lawsuits.

The filing deadline passed without any Democratic challengers leaping in.

In the past few days, Miller has tweeted from his official AG account (@AGIowa) in favor of defending the integrity of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which Mick Mulvaney is trying to gut. He’s also retweeted fellow state AGs talking about pushing back against nasty stuff that Betsy DeVos is trying to pull. But Miller hasn’t said anything related to the ACA or health care.

Democrats in Iowa, how about you call Miller’s office and ask him to join the 17 who are countersuing to save the ACA?

We can’t find a campaign website for Miller, but here’s a link to his page on VoteSmart, which has an email address for his campaign:

https://votesmart.org/candidate/biography/1768/tom-miller#.WxvtGC2ZOCc

 

 

 

Kansas: As of January 1, 2018, Republican incumbent Derek Schmidt had not decided whether he would run for a third term. Kansas has a Republican triplex.

As of January 1, 2018, no Democrats had committed to the August 7 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Kansas is one of the 20 states suing to destroy the ACA.

Democrat Sarah Swain seems to have snuck in right at the June 1 filing deadline to run for state AG. Schmidt has since committed as well.

Swain’s candidacy is so new that she doesn’t appear to have a website or a social media presence yet. We will update this post accordingly once that changes.

Here’s a June 1, 2018 article on Swain’s entry into the race: http://www2.ljworld.com/news/2018/jun/01/lawrence-attorney-sarah-swain-files-kansas-attorne/

 

 

 

Maryland: As of January 1, 2018, Democratic incumbent Brian Frosh had not decided whether he would run for a second term.

As of January 1, 2018, no other Democrats had committed to the June 26 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Maryland has not joined either of the lawsuits.

Frosh has made up his mind, though. He’s running again.

He does not appear to have made a comment on either of the suits on either his campaign site or his Facebook page.

Marylanders, how about you call Frosh’s office and ask him to join the 17?

Frosh’s campaign site is here: https://www.brianfrosh.com

 

 

Massachusetts: Democratic incumbent Maura Healey, who is awesome, will run for a second term.

As of January 1, 2018, no other Democrats had committed to the September 4 primary. But that’s OK, because Maura Healey is awesome.

 

Update, June 2018: Massachusetts is one of the 17 states countersuing to defend the ACA, because Maura Healey is awesome (did we mention that? Because she is, indeed, awesome.).

Healey will face no challengers in the September 4 primary.

See Healey’s website and donate to her campaign: http://www.maurahealey.com

Follow her on Twitter: @maura_healey

 

 

Michigan: Republican incumbent Bill Schuette is term-limited out. Michigan has a Republican triplex.

Update, June 2018: Michigan has not joined either of the lawsuits.

 

Since this post originally went up, the Michigan Democratic Party convened and chose Dana Nessel as their AG candidate.

You might remember Nessel. She did that amazing November 2017 campaign ad pushing back against sexual harassment.

She hasn’t yet said anything about either lawsuit but hey, Michiganders? We at OTYCD bet she’ll come out in favor of joining the 17 if you call and ask her to do so.

See her website and donate to her campaign: https://www.dana2018.com

Follow her on Twitter: @dananessel

 

 

 

Minnesota: As of January 1, 2018, Democratic incumbent Lori Swanson had not yet decided if she would run for a fourth term. Minnesota has a Democratic triplex.

At least four other Democrats have announced they will run in the August 14 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Minnesota is one of the 17 states countersuing to defend the ACA “by and through its Department of Commerce.” 

Swanson has since announced she will run for governor of Minnesota.

Five Democrats have filed for the August 14 primary, most notably Keith Ellison, who is giving up his House of Representatives seat in the 5th District to aim for the open Michigan state AG post.

On June 8, Ellison tweeted this message with a link to a Politico story:

Trump’s Justice Department is calling on the courts to throw out protections for people with pre-existing conditions, but CA AG Xavier Becera fights back.

See Ellison’s website and donate to his campaign: https://keithellison.org

We’ll add his AG-specific Twitter account once he creates one.

 

We at OTYCD are having trouble with Tom Foley at the moment. Ballotpedia redirects to the wrong Tom Foley (a Republican in another state), and Minnesota’s Tom Foley is far from the only Tom Foley in politics. We can’t seem to find a campaign site for him, either.

Consider this an invitation to Minnesota AG candidate Tom Foley’s folks to get in touch with us here (see the About & Subscribe page) so we can update this section accordingly.

 

Debra Hilstrom has not made a specific statement about the countersuit but we have no reason to believe she wouldn’t support it.

See Hilstrom’s website and donate to her campaign:  https://debrahilstrommn.com

Follow her on Twitter: @debrahilstrom

 

Matt Pelikan has not made a specific statement about the countersuit, but the header of his Twitter page is him standing with Senator Elizabeth Warren, so, no worries there, we think.

See Pelikan’s website and donate to his campaign: http://mattpelikan.com

Follow him on Twitter: @mattpelikan

 

Mike Rothman also has not made a specific statement in favor of the countersuit, but judging by his website, he’s probably in favor.

See Rothman’s website and donate to his campaign:

http://mikerothmanformn.com

Follow him on Twitter (warning–he doesn’t tweet much):

@MikeRothman4MN

 

 

 

Nebraska: Republican incumbent Doug Petersen will run for a second term. Nebraska has a Republican triplex.

At least one Democrat, Evangelos Argyrakis, will run in the May 15 primary.

Update, June 2018: Nebraska is one of the 20 states suing to destroy the ACA.

Unfortunately Democrats might be up the creek in this race. Argyrakis is the only Democratic candidate, but local papers reported in April that he assaulted his 82-year-old father after accusing him of taking money from his mother. So, erm, awkward.

We at OTYCD can’t seem to find a campaign website for him either, which is probably for the best. If we learn about whether a write-in campaign is allowed, we will update accordingly.

 

 

 

Nevada: Republican incumbent Adam Laxalt is running for Nevada governor instead of a second term as AG. Nevada has a Republican triplex.

At least one Democrat, state Senator Aaron Ford, will appear in the June 12 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Nevada has not joined either of the lawsuits.

Since this post came out, Stuart MacKie entered the Democratic primary.

 

On June 9, Aaron Ford tweeted:

Nevadans with preexisting conditions like asthma or diabetes deserve health care. As I will stand up for the thousands of Nevadans who could lose health care access because of this dangerous lawsuit.

See Ford’s website and donate to his campaign:

https://www.fordfornevada.com

Follow him on Twitter: @AaronDFordNV

 

Stuart MacKie has proven more elusive. We will add his campaign website and Twitter account if and when we locate them.

 

 

 

New Mexico: Democratic incumbent Hector Balderas will run for a second term.

No other Democrats have announced they will run in the June 5 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: New Mexico has not joined either of the lawsuits.

Hey, New Mexicans, how about you call or email Balderas and ask him to join the 17?

See his website and donate to his campaign: http://www.hectorbalderas.com

 

 

 

New York: Democratic incumbent Eric Schneiderman will run for a third term. New York has a Democratic triplex.

No other Democrats have announced they will run in the September 11 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: New York is one of the 17 states countersuing to defend the ACA. 

Ahem. Since we wrote this, Eric Scheiderman was outed as a horrific abuser. He resigned within hours of the news breaking. New York Solicitor General Barbara Underwood is filling in, but is not running for the AG post.

Four Democrats have entered the September 13 primary: Zephyr Teachout, Sean Patrick Maloney, Leecia Eve, and Letitia James. As of June, all are actively gathering signatures so they can appear on the ballot.

 

Zephyr Teachout does not appear to have said anything about the countersuit but we doubt she’d be against it.

See her website and donate to her campaign: https://zephyrforny.com

Follow her on Twitter: @ZephyrTeachout

 

Sean Patrick Maloney announced on June 6, 2018 that he’d run for AG, but he might not abandon his re-election campaign for his House of Representatives seat in New York’s 18th Congressional District while he does it (FWIW, we at OTYCD think this behavior is hinky. Take the risk, dammit).

He hasn’t made a specific statement about the countersuit but it’s clear he’s for it.

The only campaign site Maloney has up right now is his CONGRESSIONAL site: https://maloneyfornewyork.com

Follow him on Twitter: @MaloneyforNY

 

 

Leecia Eve has not made a public statement but we see no reason to believe she doesn’t back the countersuit.

See her website and donate to her campaign: https://leeciaeve.com

 

 

Letitia James has not made a specific public statement and doesn’t yet have a campaign site that’s specific to the AG race, but from what we’ve seen, we believe she’d support the countersuit.

She’s talking about her AG candidacy on her personal Twitter: @TishJames

 

 

 

North Dakota: As of January 1, 2018, Republican incumbent Wayne Stenehjem had not decided if he would run for a sixth term. He is the longest-serving AG in the state’s history. North Dakota has a Republican triplex.

No Democrats have announced they will run in the June 12 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: North Dakota is one of the 20 states suing to destroy the ACA.

David Clark Thompson has since become the only Democrat in the state AG race. He needs to step up his Twitter game (two tweets, both in May, that’s all), and he doesn’t appear to have said anything about the anti-ACA suit, but we don’t see anything on his site that contradicts the notion that he’d oppose the suit.

See his website and donate to his campaign: http://www.davidthompsonforndag.com

Follow his Twitter feed: @thompsonndag

 

 

 

Ohio: Republican incumbent Mike DeWine will run for governor instead of a third term as AG. Ohio has a Republican triplex.

At least one Democrat, Steven Dettelbach, will run in the May 8 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Ohio has not joined either of the lawsuits.

Dettelbach has not said anything about either lawsuit. Ohio Democrats should ask him to support the 17.

See Dettelbach’s site and donate to his campaign: https://steveforohio.com

Follow his Twitter feed: @SteveDettelbach

 

 

 

Oklahoma: Republican incumbent Mike Hunter will run for his first full term after being appointed in 2017 to take the place of Scott Pruitt, who now heads the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Oklahoma has a Republican triplex.

No Democrats have announced they will run in the June 26 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Oklahoma has not joined either of the lawsuits, which is kind of surprising when you think about it.

Since writing the original post, Democrat Mark Myles has entered the race.

He must have joined pretty recently because his campaign website is a placeholder. See it here: https://www.electmarkmyles.com

 

 

Rhode Island: Democratic incumbent Peter Kilmartin is term-limited out. Rhode Island has a Democratic triplex.

At least one Democrat, Peter Neronha, will run in the September 12 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Rhode Island is one of the 17 states countersuing to defend the ACA. 

Nehrona has not said anything specific about the countersuit but we have no reason to believe he doesn’t support it.

See his website and donate to his campaign: https://peterneronha.com

Follow him on Twitter: @PeterNehrona

 

 

 

South Carolina: Republican incumbent Alan Wilson will run for a third term. South Carolina has a Republican triplex.

No Democrats have announced they will run in the June 12 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: South Carolina is one of the 20 states suing to destroy the ACA.

Since writing the original post, Democrat Constance Anastopoulo entered the race. She will run unopposed in the primary.

As with many Democratic AG candidates, Anastopoulo has not said anything specific about her state joining the anti-ACA suit, but nothing on her campaign site indicates she’d support it.

See her site and donate to her campaign: https://www.anastopouloforag.com

 

 

South Dakota: Republican incumbent Marty J. Jackley will run for governor instead of a third term as AG. South Dakota has a Republican triplex.

No Democrats have announced they will run in the June 5 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: South Dakota is one of the 20 states suing to destroy the ACA.

South Dakota Democrats will choose between two AG candidates at their June 15-16 convention: Tatewin Means and Randy Seiler.

Right now, both are using Facebook instead of splashing out on campaign sites. Neither has directly addressed the lawsuit, but Seiler did write a health care-themed post of note on June 8:

SD recently expanded coverage of substance abuse to people who qualify for Medicaid. Falls short though in expanding eligibility that could target services to get people the help they need – with the Federal government paying 90% of cost. Note that Republican AG candidate Russell voted no on the expanded coverage for treatment.

See Seiler’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/randyseilerforattorneygeneral

See Means’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/MeansforAG/

 

 

Texas: Republican incumbent Ken Paxton will run for a second term. Texas has a Republican triplex.

At least one Democrat, Justin Nelson, will run in the March 6 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Texas is one of the 20 states suing to destroy the ACA, and is co-leading the effort with Wisconsin’s AG.

Nelson ran alone in the primary.

On June 9, he tweeted:

Here’s the pattern now: Ken Paxton files a lawsuit to make a partisan point and to distract from his own indictment. Trump then uses Paxton’s suit as an excuse. Lather, rinse, repeat. That’s wrong. I believe it’s Texas first, not Tea Party first.

See Nelson’s site and donate to his campaign: https://www.nelsonfortexas.com

Follow him on Twitter: @NelsonforTexas

 

 

 

Vermont: As of January 1, 2018, Democratic incumbent T.J. Donovan has not decided if he’ll run for a second term.

No Democrats have announced they will run in the August 14 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Vermont is one of the 17 states countersuing to defend the ACA. 

Donovan did commit and defeated a Democratic primary challenger to run again.

See his site here and donate to his campaign: http://donovanforvermont.com

Follow him on Twitter: @TJforVermont

 

 

 

Wisconsin: Republican incumbent Brad Schimel will run for a second term.

At least one Democrat, Josh Kaul, will run in the August 14 primary.

 

Update, June 2018: Wisconsin is one of the 20 states suing to destroy the ACA, and is co-leading the effort with Texas’s AG.

The filing deadline passed on June 1, meaning Kaul will run unopposed in the primary. He’s the son of a former AG, Peg Lautenschlager.

On June 8, Kaul tweeted:

‘s effort to allow health-insurance companies to deny coverage to Wisconsinites with pre-existing conditions is wrong. We should be working to expand access to affordable care.

See Kaul’s website and donate to his campaign: https://www.joshkaul.org

Follow him on Twitter: @JoshKaulWI

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

See the document that lists the 20 states that are suing to kill the ACA:

https://www.texasattorneygeneral.gov/files/epress/Texas_Wisconsin_et_al_v._U.S._et_al_-_ACA_Complaint_(02-26-18).pdf?cachebuster:23

 

 

Xavier Becerra put out a press release on June 7 that lists all 17 states and entities that are countersuing to defend the ACA:

https://oag.ca.gov/news/press-releases/texas-v-hhs-attorney-general-becerra-leads-coalition-16-attorneys-general

 

 

We at OTYCD relied on raw info from Ballotpedia to assemble this post. See the Ballotpedia home page:

https://ballotpedia.org/Main_Page

 

 

Donate to Ballotpedia ($18 corresponds to the cost of a single article):

https://ballotpedia.org/Ballotpedia:Donate

 

 

Like Ballotpedia on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Ballotpedia?ref=br_tf

 

 

Follow Ballotpedia on Twitter:

@ballotpedia

 

Candidates · Choose Your Core Four · Elections

Support Democrat Dan Canon, Who Is Running for a House Seat In Indiana’s 9th District (May 26, 2018 Update)

Update, May 26, 2018: Canon was defeated in the May 8 Democratic primary. We at OTYCD encourage him to run again for public office in the future.

 

Support Democrat Dan Canon, who is running for a House of Representatives seat in Indiana’s 9th District.

 

Canon is a civil rights lawyer and the son of a working-class single mother. He didn’t take a straightforward educational path; he dropped out of high school at 17 and earned a GED before putting himself through college. He represented a gay Kentucky couple who fought their state’s ban on gay marriage in a suit that was ultimately folded into the Obergefell vs Hodges case, which made same-sex marriage legal across America.

 

Canon supports H.R. 676, the Medicare for All act, and he believes that health care is a right. He wants to combat the opioid crisis in part by expanding access to non-opioid alternatives, such as medical marijuana, and by increasing the availability of naloxone, a drug that can stop or reverse an overdose.

 

He supports a constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United and supports H.B. 2840, the Automatic Voter Registration Act. He wants to increase the national minimum wage to $15 per hour, and would vote for H.R. 15, an act that would schedule a series of federal minimum wage increases and phase out minimum wage requirements for tipped and disabled employees as well as new hires.

 

He supports laws that support unions and protect the right of workers to organize. He favors strengthening the Clean Air and Clean Water acts, and wants to end subsidies for fossil fuel industries. He wants a clean DREAM act. He wants to end the death penalty and remove federal laws that criminalize marijuana.

 

He supports repealing the Hyde Amendment, which prevents the federal government from paying for abortions in most situations. He wants to repeal the Dickey amendment, which stops the Centers for Disease Control from studying the causes of gun violence in America.

 

We could go on and on and on some more, but suffice it to say–the Policies section of Canon’s campaign site is clear, detailed, and well thought-out.

 

He gets bonus points from us for citing actual House bills, by number, which he would vote for if he’s elected to the House of Representatives, in explaining what he stands for, and why.

 

Canon aims to unseat Republican Trey Hollingsworth, a freshman House Representative who won in 2016 with 54.1 percent of the vote to the Democrat’s 40.5 percent. Four other Democrats are running in the primary, which takes place on May 8, 2018. The Cook Political Report rates the race as Solid Republican.

 

 

See Dan Canon’s campaign website:

https://canonforindiana.com

 

 

See the Policies section of his website (scroll down):

https://canonforindiana.com/priorities

 

 

Choose Canon for your Core Four:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/24/choose-your-core-four-for-2018/

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Donate to Canon’s campaign:

https://secure.actblue.com/donate/canon_for_indiana

 

 

Like his Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/CanonForIndiana/

 

 

Follow him on Twitter:

@CanonforIndiana

 

 

See the Ballotpedia page on Indiana’s 9th District:

https://ballotpedia.org/Indiana%27s_9th_Congressional_District_election,_2018

 

 

See a July 2017 article that explains Canon’s connection to Obergefell vs Hodges:

http://www.metroweekly.com/2017/07/attorney-represented-kentucky-gay-marriage-plaintiffs-run-congress/

Candidates · Choose Your Core Four · Elections

Support Jana Lynne Sanchez, Who Is Running for a Texas House Seat in 2018 (Update May 26, 2018)

This OTYCD entry originally posted in July 2017.

 

Update, May 26, 2018: Sanchez won the May 22 primary. Hooray! The general election takes place November 6.

 

Update, March 11, 2018: Sanchez advanced to the May 22, 2018 Democratic primary runoff, pulling in 36.88 percent of the vote to Ruby Faye Woolridge’s 36.94 percent of the vote. We at OTYCD wish Sanchez luck in the May contest.

 

Support Jana Lynne Sanchez, a Democrat who is running for the House of Representatives in Texas’s 6th District in 2018.

 

A lifelong Texan, Sanchez is pro-choice, pro-LGBT rights, and pro-public schools. She supports the freedoms laid out in the Bill of Rights, the first and second amendments in particular. She supports the decriminalization of marijuana. She favors universal healthcare. As the granddaughter of an undocumented migrant worker who became a U.S. citizen the year before he died, she embraces humane immigration reform.

 

 

See Sanchez’s campaign website:

sanchezforcongress2018.com

 

 

See her “Issues” page:

Issues

 

 

Consider Sanchez for your Core Four for 2018:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/24/choose-your-core-four-for-2018/

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

See her Merch page:

We have merch!

 

 

Follow her on Twitter:

@janasanchez

 

 

Read a Bustle piece on Sanchez and other Democratic women running in Texas:

https://www.bustle.com/p/these-women-want-to-turn-the-reddest-state-blue-63249

 

 

Donate to her campaign:

Donate

Candidates · Choose Your Core Four · Elections · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends · Vote with your Dollars

Support Democrat Joseph Kopser, Who Hopes to Fill the Texas House Seat Being Vacated by Republican Lamar Smith (Update May 26, 2018)

Update, May 2018: Kopser won the May 22, 2018 Democratic primary. Hooray! The general election takes place November 6, 2018.

 

Support Democrat Joseph Kopser, who is running in 2018 for the seat being vacated by Texas Republican Lamar Smith.

 

Kopser is a West Point Graduate who served 20 years in the U.S. Army and multiple deployments to Iraq. He earned the Bronze Star and the Combat Action Badge. He earned a Master’s in Public Administration from Harvard University. He founded Ridescout, a tech company in Austin, and ultimately sold it to a Fortune 100 company.

 

Kopser came second in the March 6, 2018 Democratic primary and advanced to the May 22 runoff against Mary Street Wilson. She won 31 percent of the vote to his 29 percent.

 

Smith had held his House seat for more than 30 years before announcing that he would not run again in 2018. Smith chairs the House Science Committee, and has done a poor job at it, trying to subject National Science Foundation grant reviews to politically-motivated review, among other shenanigans. Worse still, Smith supported Trump early and often. Of course he voted for the GOP’s reckless partisan health care bill.

 

Kopser promises to be smarter, better, and saner than Smith, as well as a hell of a lot more responsive to the district’s constituents.

 

 

See Kopser’s campaign website:

https://www.kopserforcongress.com

 

 

See his Meet Joseph page:

https://www.kopserforcongress.com/meet-joseph/

 

 

See his Why I’m Running page:

https://www.kopserforcongress.com/why-im-running/

 

 

Consider Kopser for your Core Four for 2018:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/24/choose-your-core-four-for-2018/

 

 

Donate to Kopser’s campaign:

https://secure.actblue.com/donate/314action_kopser?refcode=website

 

 

Like him on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/KopserforCongress/

 

 

Follow him on Twitter:

@Kopser4Congress

 

 

See his 314 Action page:

http://www.314action.org/joseph-kopser

 

 

See 314 Action’s Endorsed Candidates page:

http://www.314action.org/endorsed-candidates/

 

 

Donate to 314 Action:

https://secure.actblue.com/contribute/page/314act?refcode=website&amounts=15,25,50,100,250,500,1000&amount=25&recurring=true

 

 

 

Read a March 2017 interview with Kopser on whether he’ll run:

http://www.xconomy.com/texas/2017/03/20/why-austin-tech-entrepreneur-joseph-kopser-might-run-for-congress/

 

 

Read a March 2018 story on the Texas Democratic primary results:

https://www.texastribune.org/2018/03/06/texas-primary-election-open-congressional-seats/

Candidates · Choose Your Core Four · Elections

Support Democrat Tom Prigg’s Run for the House of Representatives Seat in Pennsylvania’s 12th District (Update May 26, 2018)

This post originally appeared in February 2018.

 

Update: Prigg was defeated by Bibiana Boerio in the May 15, 2018 Democratic primary. We at OTYCD encourage Prigg to run for public office again in the future.

 

Support Democrat Tom Prigg’s run for the House of Representatives seat in Pennsylvania’s 12th District.

 

Prigg is a veteran who served with the 82nd Airborne. He’s also a scientist–a research associate at Carnegie Mellon University where he pursues neuroscience. During a gap in his scientific career, he earned a bachelor’s degree in creative non-fiction writing and wrote for several newsstand magazines.

 

His platform is unusually well-thought out and should serve as a model to others who want to run for Congressional office. It covers eleven major topics that matter, explains why they matter, and explains what Prigg would do about them. He’s particularly strong on defending unions, workers’ rights, and helping veterans.

 

Among the many things he promises to do if elected is draft parental leave legislation that covers both parents; he would support unions by fighting destructive right-to-work laws and restoring collective bargaining rights; he would support laws to overturn Citizens United; he wants a universal healthcare system, and would fight laws that limit access to care centers, would allow insurers to deny care or charge more to people with pre-existing conditions; and would work to end lifetime caps on coverage.

 

Prigg is one of six Democrats running for the House of Representatives seat in Pennsylvania. The incumbent, Republican Keith Rothfus, will run for a fourth term. In 2016, Rothfus defeated his Democratic rival by almost two to one. Ballotpedia rated Pennsylvania’s 12th District as safely Republican ahead of the 2016 vote.

 

 

See Prigg’s campaign website:

https://www.tompriggforcongress.com

 

 

See his Bio page:

https://www.tompriggforcongress.com/bio/

 

 

See his platform:

https://www.tompriggforcongress.com/platform/

 

 

Donate to his campaign:

https://www.tompriggforcongress.com/donate/

 

 

Volunteer for him:

https://www.tompriggforcongress.com/volunteer/

 

 

Choose Prigg for your Core Four for 2018:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/24/choose-your-core-four-for-2018/

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Like him on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/TomPrigg2018

 

 

Follow him on Twitter:

@TomPrigg2018

Candidates · Choose Your Core Four · Elections

Support Allison Campolo, 2018 Candidate for Texas State Senate District 10 (Update May 22, 2018)

This OTYCD entry originally posted in December 2017.

 

Update, May 26, 2018: Campolo lost the May 22 Democratic primary to Beverly Powell. We at OTYCD encourage Campolo to run again in the future.

 

Update: Campolo was defeated in the March 6, 2018 Democratic primary. Democrat Beverly Powell will face incumbent Republican Konni Burton in November. We at OTYC hope Campolo will run for another office in the future.

 

Support Allison Campolo, who will run as a Democrat for Texas State Senate, District 10, in 2018.

 

District 10 is Wendy Davis’s old district. It is now held by Republican Konni Burton, who won the seat in 2014. (Davis chose to run for governor of Texas in that year, and lost.) Ballotpedia reflects the district’s electorate as being 47.6 percent white, 47.5 percent black and hispanic, and 4.9 percent other.

 

As of September 2017–more than a year before the election–Campolo had a solid and complete campaign web site up, including a merch page.

 

She is PISSED that Texas has one of the worst maternal mortality rates in the world, and intends to do something about it. She is pro-choice and wants to raise the minimum wage. She believes health care is a right. She supports state-funded programs that would retrain workers in the carbon-based fuel industries for jobs in sustainable energy, such as wind. She wants campaign reform, and that means public campaign and election financing. She’s specifically against for-profit prisons. She supports voting rights and public schools. She wants to tweak gun laws to improve safety overall.

 

And, and, and! Her About page is a hoot. She reveals herself as having been a teenage live-action role play gamer and “a bona fide nerd!”, and admits she let her husband, Alex, talk her into running the 2016 Honolulu marathon, noting that she “did not die or divorce afterwards.”

 

 

See Campolo’s campaign web site for the Texas state senate seat:

https://campolofortexas.com

 

 

See her About page:

https://campolofortexas.com/about/

 

 

See her Issues page:

https://campolofortexas.com/issues-2/

 

 

Consider Campolo for your Core Four for 2018:

https://onethingyoucando.com/2017/12/24/choose-your-core-four-for-2018/

 

 

Follow Campolo on Twitter:

@AllisonCampolo

 

 

Like her on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/CampoloforTexas/

 

 

Donate to her campaign:

https://campolofortexas.com/donate/

 

 

Buy Campolo merch:

https://campolofortexas.com/gear/

 

 

See the Ballotpedia page on Texas State Senate District 10:

https://ballotpedia.org/Texas_State_Senate_District_10