Marches and Protests

Like Dave Madeloni’s Page on Facebook

Like Dave Madeloni’s Facebook page, where he posts his Images of Resistance.

Madeloni is an educator and journalist from Massachusetts who has been attending the various anti-Trump protests and photographing protest signs.

He posts one per day to his Facebook page under the heading Images of Resistance. As of June 3, he was up to 130 or so.

He captures the witty and the straightforward, the pointed and the poignant, the polished and the proudly home-brewed. It’s refreshing and it’ll make you happy.

Like Dave Madeloni’s page on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/dave.madeloni

 

Action Alerts

Tell Your MoCs That You Saw Their Social Media Posts

When you talk to your members of Congress, make sure to cite specific posts they’ve made to their social media accounts.

 

We live in the world of Facebook and Twitter, but our members of Congress don’t–at least not to the extent that we do. To them, phone calls are real, and letters are real, and email and faxes and postcards are real.

 

Social media posts are not as real to them as those other forms of communication. If you tweet at your MoCs or comment on their Facebook posts, they don’t take those statements as seriously as if you had phoned them or mailed them.

 

There’s a lot of reasons why this is so, and they’re long and boring and not really the point of this post. The point is that when you contact your MoCs by the means that are real to them, you should mention, and quote back to them, specific things you saw on their social media accounts.

 

Facebook, Twitter, and the like will start to become more real to your MoCs, and more like letters and phone calls and faxes in their minds, when you show them that you, their constituents and supporters, pay attention to social media.

 

The best way to do this is when you are contacting them to thank them for doing something: “Hey Senator (Lastname)! I saw you tweet about signing the Congressional letter condemning Trump’s pulling out of the Paris accord. Thank you for doing that!’ Linking social media with positive feedback will help move us closer to the day when social media becomes as accepted as all those other forms of communication.

 

Community Activism · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Thank You Actions · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends · Vote with your Dollars

Follow Other Democratic Members of Congress on Social Media

This OTYCD entry originally posted in January 2017.

Are you a fan of California Senator Kamala Harris? How about New Jersey Senator Cory Booker? Or Minnesota House rep Keith Ellison?

Trolls target the social media postings of these and other popular Democratic members of Congress online, making nasty comments on their Facebook pages and their tweets.

You already know that you should not call members of Congress who do not represent you. They do not listen to citizens who live outside their legislative area. But you can support Democratic members of Congress you like, but who don’t represent you, by following them on social media. 

Liking and sharing their posts helps get their message out. While you should still pay the most attention to your own reps’ social media accounts, following other Democrats online lets you know what those like-minded folks are saying and doing.

Learning what they are doing readies you to call your own reps and ask them to support what those out-of-state Democrats are doing. You can indirectly help Democrats you like by asking your own Congressional delegation to join forces with them on specific bills and actions that matter to you.

House Bills, Federal · Russian Scandal, Emoluments Clause · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Ask Your House Rep to Support H.R. 2884, the COVFEFE Act

This OTYCD entry originally posted in June 2017.

Ask your House rep to support H.R. 2884, the Communications Over Various Feeds Electronically for Engagement Act, aka the COVFEFE act. 

OK, Illinois Democrat Mike Quigley was having a bit of fun when he named his act, but it has a serious and worthy purpose. It would amend the Presidential Records Act of 1978 to specify that a president’s communications over social media count as presidential records.

Amending the law in this manner formally recognizes that Donald Trump’s tweets, be they from his POTUS account or his personal account, are considered presidential communications, and must be documented for posterity. The law could also prevent Trump and future presidents from deleting tweets and might prevent a president from blocking individuals on Twitter.

 

Read GovTrack’s backgrounder on the COVFEFE Act:

https://govtrackinsider.com/the-covfefe-act-would-permanently-archive-all-of-president-trumps-social-media-posts-c77b97d5802b

 

See the GovTrack page on the bill:

https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/115/hr2884

 

Read the text of the COVFEFE Act:

https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/115/hr2884/text

 

 

 

Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare

Read “Call the Halls”, Follow Author Emily Ellsworth

This OTYCD entry originally posted in January 2017.

 

Read Call the Halls, a guide to effectively contacting your members of Congress, and follow its author, former Utah Congressional aide Emily Ellsworth.

 

Within days of the election, Ellsworth was tweeting advice on what worked and didn’t work when talking to your Congressional delegation. That led her to write Call the Halls, which you can download here (if you can give a donation, please do; if you can’t, no worries–she deliberately created a free option):

 

http://www.emilyellsworth.com/

 

She seems to be the first to stress the fact that calling is the best way to speak to your Congressional reps. This blog would not exist without her and her early work.

 

 

Follow her on Twitter:

@editoremilye

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Like her on Facebook:

@emilyellsworth

 

 

She also posts relevant stories to Medium every now and again. 

View at Medium.com

View at Medium.com

Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Save These Tools · Vote with your Dollars

Read, Follow, and Support LawfareBlog

This OTYCD entry originally posted in July 2017.

 

Read, follow, and support Lawfare, a blog that tackles many legal issues that happen to affect Trump and his administration.

 

Lawfare launched in September 2010 and represents the sort of thing we at OTYCD wish we’d known about before Trump was elected, because it is fascinating, smart, and occasionally a source of comfort. It probes “that nebulous zone in which actions taken or contemplated to protect the nation interact with the nation’s laws and legal institutions.”

 

You’ll be utterly unsurprised to learn that Trump and his minions are keeping Lawfare‘s bloggers particularly busy lately.

 

 

See the Lawfareblog home page here:

https://www.lawfareblog.com

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Below are a few choice stories that illustrate why Lawfareblog is a must-read (if not the breeziest read, but hey, it doesn’t pretend to be):

 

 

The Rules of Congressional Investigations and Trump’s Growing Russia Problem:

https://www.lawfareblog.com/rules-congressional-investigations-and-trumps-growing-russia-problem

 

 

How to Deal with Reichstag Fire Fears in the Age of Trump:

https://www.lawfareblog.com/how-deal-reichstag-fire-fears-age-trump

 

 

(From July 2016): Jim Comey’s Statement on the Clinton Emails: A Quick and Dirty Analysis:

https://www.lawfareblog.com/jim-comeys-statement-clinton-emails-quick-and-dirty-analysis

 

 

 

Support Lawfareblog:

https://www.lawfareblog.com/support-lawfare

 

 

Like Lawfareblog‘s Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/Lawfareblog

 

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@lawfareblog

Community Activism · Protect the Environment · Save These Tools · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Join the Postcards for America Page and Keep Fighting Trump With Postcards

This OTYCD entry originally posted in March 2017.

 

The OTYCD page on joining #TheIdesOfTrump–the effort to bury Trump in postcards on March 15–is the most popular in the young blog’s history.

 

Seeing as you all have such an appetite for sending postcards, we’re doing a post on one or our favorite Facebook activist pages: Postcards for America.

 

Its main goal is to encourage you to send postcards to your members of Congress about your fears and concerns. But it also alerts you to other postcard campaigns and suggests legislators who might benefit from receiving great wobbling piles of postcards that tell them they’re wrong, or in some cases, exquisitely correct and in need of thanks.

 

Apply for admission to the Postcards for America Facebook group:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/postcardsforamerica/

 

Please note: Postcards for America is a closed group. You can apply to join and you will have to wait for an administrator to approve you before you are admitted.

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

Call Your House Rep · Call Your Members of Congress · Call Your Senators · Community Activism · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Save These Tools · Thank You Actions · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Follow Your Congressional Reps on Social Media

Are you active on social media, even a little bit? Are you thinking about signing on?

Please follow the pages and accounts of your Congressional representatives.

Pull up the web pages of your three Congressional reps–your two senators and your house rep. Social media platform logos tend to show up at the top of the home page or the bottom. If they’re not there, try the Contact page.

Most members of Congress are on Facebook and Twitter. If they’re on other platforms and you want to follow them there, go right ahead. But don’t feel like you must follow them on every platform. Do what makes sense for you.

If any of your reps are not on social media, or aren’t on the platform you like best, call their offices and ask them to join. You can bet there’s an intern or entry-level staffer who’s been chewing the rep’s ear off, trying to make their case. If enough constituents call to ask them to get on social media, or on a specific platform, that might change their minds.

Following your reps on social media is worth it. It keeps you up to date on what they’re saying and doing, and lets you know when they might appear at an event happening near you. It lets you show your support for them. And it helps move toward a world in which members of Congress take messages that arrive through social media as seriously as requests that come over the phone or through postal mail.

But don’t forget that for now (early 2017), social media is the least effective way to speak to your reps. If you need to ask your members of Congress to do something, use the phone. Do not use social media. Your message will not get through to them.

If you’re not on social media at all, consider signing up to follow your reps. You can have a private account on Twitter, and you can keep strict privacy settings on your Facebook page.

If you’re not on social media at all and have no wish to be, sign up for their e-newsletters and postal mailings instead, if you haven’t already. You should be able to do this through their web sites.

 

Postcard Campaigns

Join the Postcards for America Page on Facebook and Keep Bombarding Trump with Postcards

This OTYCD entry originally posted in March 2017.

The OTYCD page on joining #TheIdesOfTrump–the effort to bury Trump in postcards on March 15–is the most popular in the young blog’s history.

Seeing as you all have such an appetite for sending postcards, we’re doing a post on one or our favorite Facebook activist pages: Postcards for America.

Its main goal is to encourage you to send postcards to your members of Congress about your fears and concerns. But it also alerts you to other postcard campaigns and suggests legislators who might benefit from receiving great wobbling piles of postcards that tell them they’re wrong, or in some cases, exquisitely correct and in need of thanks.

Apply for admission to the Postcards for America Facebook group:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/postcardsforamerica/

Please note: Postcards for America is a closed group. You can apply to join and you will have to wait for an administrator to approve you before you are admitted.

 

Escape Your Bubble

Learn What the Other Side is Reading on Facebook

 

Check out this startling tool that shows what’s trending on liberal and conservative Facebook pages.

Offered by the Wall Street Journal, carrying Jon Keegan’s byline, and launched in May 2016, it shows just how intractably divided we are. On the left, you see the “liberal” feed on a variety of topics you can choose from: Trump, the ACA, abortion, immigration, protests, guns, ISIS, and executive orders. The “conservative” feed is on the right.

It’s an eye-opener, and not necessarily a good or uplifting way. Don’t go here on days when you need to believe that everything will work out eventually, and brace yourself before clicking. The feeds are updated hourly.

http://graphics.wsj.com/blue-feed-red-feed/#/president-trump