Community Activism · Elections · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare

Subscribe to Political Charge, Tokyo Sand’s Blog

Subscribe to Political Charge, the blog written by tweeter Tokyo Sand.

 

If you’re on Twitter and you’re part of the Resistance, you’ve come across Tokyo Sand. Their tweets are valuable and focused.

 

 

You might not be aware that Tokyo Sand has a blog as well. Political Charge is as valuable and focused as Tokyo Sand’s tweets, with explainers on gerrymandering, money laundering, and why town halls are worth your time.

 

 

It also features interviews with activists such as Pat Gunn, who helped elect Manka Dhingra to the Washington state senate and turned the entire West Coast solidly blue, and Frannie James, who volunteered in Alabama for Doug Jones’s campaign.

 

 

In a world that swamps us with content from all directions, Political Charge is worth your time and deserves a place in your inbox.

 

 

See the Political Charge blog (the subscription button is at the lower right, at the bottom of the page):

https://politicalcharge.org

 

 

See Political Charge’s piece on Getting Started in Political Activism:

Getting Started in Political Activism

 

 

Follow Tokyo Sand on Twitter:

@DHStokyo

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Escape Your Bubble

Escape Your Bubble: Follow Rick Wilson on Twitter

This OTYCD entry originally posted in August 2017.

 

Escape your bubble by following Rick Wilson on Twitter.

 

Wilson is a Florida-based political consultant who has worked primarily for Republicans, producing television for Senate candidates, governors, and the like.

 

He gained new prominence during the 2016 presidential campaign, when he turned the full force of his vitriol on Trump and his supporters. Suffice it to say his vitriol is concentrated, deadly, and goddamn entertaining.

 

Obligatory warning, with apologies for bonking you all on the head about this fact: Wilson holds at least some different political beliefs than you do. That means he’ll sometimes say things and do things that don’t match your beliefs, and which might piss you off well and thoroughly. That’s ok. Really, it’s OK. You’re being asked to look at what he’s doing and support what you like, not endorse every last little everything he does. He understands the danger of Trump–that’s the key thing. One of the reasons this country is so borked right now is we’re fiercely polarized and, in avoiding jerks who disagree with us, we end up avoiding decent people who happen to disagree with us. That’s got to stop if we want to make things better.

 

 

Follow Rick Wilson on Twitter:

@TheRickWilson

 

 

Bonus: Read his articles at The Daily Beast, which include this:

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2017/04/10/the-trouble-with-trump-s-white-house-is-donald-trump

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

Escape Your Bubble · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare

Show Some Love to Snopes.com, the First Fact-Checking Site on the Web (Updated March 13, 2018)

Update, March 13, 2018: David Mikkelson posted an update to the Snopes GoFundMe page last night. Fortunately, Snopes has had success in court to date. They recovered the advertising revenue that had been withheld, they were able to switch to a new hosting service and reassert control of their future ad revenue, and suits against Mikkelson were dismissed last month.

 

In response to questions about how to show support for Snopes going forward, Mikkelson raised the cap on the GoFundMe to $2 million. Legal fees have eaten the funds raised previously, and while things have gone well, they’re not done with the court system just yet. If you can help Snopes, please do.

 

Original text of our post follows:

 

We wrote and queued this post before word broke of Snopes.com’s troubles and its GoFundMe campaign. We are moving up the posting date for this piece and including a link to the fundraiser:

https://www.gofundme.com/savesnopes

 

As we write this update, the campaign has met its $500,000 goal but is still accepting donations. If you haven’t given, please do.

 

Let’s hear it for Snopes.com, the first, and still the most fascinating, fact-checking, myth-busting, rumor-stomping site on the web.

 

Snopes dates back to 1994, which is paleozoic by Internet standards. It evolved over time from being the work of a few people to the work of an entire team of researchers and writers who strive to be transparent and accurate, following the evidence wherever it leads.

 

We at OTYCD believe that the country passed a dark threshold when rabid right-wingers started claiming that Snopes had a liberal bias, and other such ridiculous things. In retrospect, it seems like a portent of the rise of Trumpism. But we digress.

 

Snopes, which is named after a family of characters who pop up in William Faulkner novels, is as incisive as it is entertaining, and you should visit it on the regular if you don’t already. It can save you from retweeting or posting information that’s more complex than the memes make it out to be, or just plain wrong, no matter where it comes from.

 

 

See the Snopes.com site:

http://www.snopes.com

 

 

Read the Snopes ‘About’ page:

http://www.snopes.com/about-snopes/

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Read the Snopes FAQ page:

http://www.snopes.com/frequently-asked-questions/

 

 

Like it on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/snopes

 

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@snopes

Community Activism · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Thank You Actions · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends · Vote with your Dollars

Follow Other Democratic Members of Congress on Social Media

This OTYCD entry originally posted in January 2017.

Are you a fan of California Senator Kamala Harris? How about New Jersey Senator Cory Booker? Or Minnesota House rep Keith Ellison?

Trolls target the social media postings of these and other popular Democratic members of Congress online, making nasty comments on their Facebook pages and their tweets.

You already know that you should not call members of Congress who do not represent you. They do not listen to citizens who live outside their legislative area. But you can support Democratic members of Congress you like, but who don’t represent you, by following them on social media. 

Liking and sharing their posts helps get their message out. While you should still pay the most attention to your own reps’ social media accounts, following other Democrats online lets you know what those like-minded folks are saying and doing.

Learning what they are doing readies you to call your own reps and ask them to support what those out-of-state Democrats are doing. You can indirectly help Democrats you like by asking your own Congressional delegation to join forces with them on specific bills and actions that matter to you.

Uncategorized

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do, Follow the Twitter Account, and Tell Your Friends About the Blog

Do you like this blog? Subscribe to it and tell your friends about it.

Ok, we at One Thing You Can Do probably should have asked you to do this long before. Our bad. We were too busy writing posts. It’s long past time to ask you all to step up. If you like this blog, please subscribe, and share it with your friends.

Everyone at OTYCD donates their time to the blog. Your support, in the form of visits, shares, likes, retweets, and endorsements keeps us going. We’re grateful for whatever you can do.

Also, follow the Twitter account:

@OneThingYCD

Action Alerts · Social Media · Thank You Actions

Follow Sally Yates and Preet Bharara on Twitter

This OTYCD entry originally posted in October 2017.

Follow Sally Yates and Preet Bharara on Twitter.

Yates, the former Deputy Attorney General joined Twitter late in June. We at OTYCD have been looking for ways to support her. Following her is a good place to start.

 

Here’s her handle:

@SallyQYates

 

And here’s what she linked to in her first tweet, her Washington Post op-ed, called Making America Scared Again Won’t Make Us Safer:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/making-america-scared-again-wont-make-us-safer/2017/06/23/f53d238e-578a-11e7-ba90-f5875b7d1876_story.html?utm_term=.4ad39cc4dbb9

 

Also, check out who she’s following. Cool people and entities lurk therein:

https://twitter.com/SallyQYates/following

 

It won’t shock you to learn that one of the select few Yates follows is Preet Bharara, former U.S. Attorney General for New York. He was active on Twitter before Trump fired him and he updated his Twitter bio to tout that credential. His feed is smart, nimble, and pointed.

 

His Twitter handle is:

@PreetBharara

Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare

Read “Call the Halls”, Follow Author Emily Ellsworth

This OTYCD entry originally posted in January 2017.

 

Read Call the Halls, a guide to effectively contacting your members of Congress, and follow its author, former Utah Congressional aide Emily Ellsworth.

 

Within days of the election, Ellsworth was tweeting advice on what worked and didn’t work when talking to your Congressional delegation. That led her to write Call the Halls, which you can download here (if you can give a donation, please do; if you can’t, no worries–she deliberately created a free option):

 

http://www.emilyellsworth.com/

 

She seems to be the first to stress the fact that calling is the best way to speak to your Congressional reps. This blog would not exist without her and her early work.

 

 

Follow her on Twitter:

@editoremilye

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Like her on Facebook:

@emilyellsworth

 

 

She also posts relevant stories to Medium every now and again. 

View at Medium.com

View at Medium.com

Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Save These Tools · Vote with your Dollars

Read, Follow, and Support LawfareBlog

This OTYCD entry originally posted in July 2017.

 

Read, follow, and support Lawfare, a blog that tackles many legal issues that happen to affect Trump and his administration.

 

Lawfare launched in September 2010 and represents the sort of thing we at OTYCD wish we’d known about before Trump was elected, because it is fascinating, smart, and occasionally a source of comfort. It probes “that nebulous zone in which actions taken or contemplated to protect the nation interact with the nation’s laws and legal institutions.”

 

You’ll be utterly unsurprised to learn that Trump and his minions are keeping Lawfare‘s bloggers particularly busy lately.

 

 

See the Lawfareblog home page here:

https://www.lawfareblog.com

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Below are a few choice stories that illustrate why Lawfareblog is a must-read (if not the breeziest read, but hey, it doesn’t pretend to be):

 

 

The Rules of Congressional Investigations and Trump’s Growing Russia Problem:

https://www.lawfareblog.com/rules-congressional-investigations-and-trumps-growing-russia-problem

 

 

How to Deal with Reichstag Fire Fears in the Age of Trump:

https://www.lawfareblog.com/how-deal-reichstag-fire-fears-age-trump

 

 

(From July 2016): Jim Comey’s Statement on the Clinton Emails: A Quick and Dirty Analysis:

https://www.lawfareblog.com/jim-comeys-statement-clinton-emails-quick-and-dirty-analysis

 

 

 

Support Lawfareblog:

https://www.lawfareblog.com/support-lawfare

 

 

Like Lawfareblog‘s Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/Lawfareblog

 

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@lawfareblog

Elections · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Russian Scandal, Emoluments Clause · Social Media · Uncategorized

Follow Legal Expert Renato Mariotti on Twitter And Support His Campaign To Be Illinois’s Attorney General (Update April 8, 2018)

This OTYCD entry originally posted in November 2017.

 

Update, April 8, 2018: Mariotti did not win the Democratic primary for the state attorney general post. We at One Thing You Can Do thank him for running.

 

Follow legal expert Renato Mariotti on Twitter, and support his campaign to serve as Illinois’s next attorney general. 

 

When something happens in Mueller’s Trump-Russia investigation, Mariotti, a formal federal prosecutor, tweets solid explanations that are blessedly light on jargon.

 

He’s quick on the draw, his takes make sense, and he’s careful to acknowledge when he’s forming an educated guess.

 

Since becoming a Twitter sage and a go-to legal expert for television shows, Mariotti has announced his candidacy for Illinois Attorney General. The election takes place in 2018. (Lisa Madigan, the Democratic incumbent, has decided not to run for a fifth term.) He faces six others in the Democratic primary. Please support his efforts.

 

 

See Mariotti’s campaign website:

https://renatomariotti.com

 

 

Follow him on Twitter:

@renato_mariotti

 

 

See his ‘Meet Renato’ page:

https://renatomariotti.com/meet-renato/

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Like him on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/RenatoForIllinois

 

 

Donate to his campaign:

https://secure.ngpvan.com/jk0yN-dCJ02VmyJ4UFqu0w2

 

 

Read an October 2017 Politico piece on Mariotti declaring his candidacy:

https://www.politico.com/story/2017/10/27/renato-mariotti-illinois-attorney-general-244243

Uncategorized

Learn to Welcome Others to the Movement, Period, Full Stop

This OTYCD entry originally posted in April 2017.

Learn to welcome others to the movement, period, full stop.

In November 2016, New York magazine published a fascinating article that didn’t get the recognition it deserved. Titled Why Some Protests Succeed While Others Fail and filed under its Science of Us blog, the story contained mind-blowing revelations about how best to cultivate and direct the anti-Trump energy that arose after the election.

http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2016/11/how-should-trump-protesters-organize-themselves.html

First, let’s list the takeaways from the piece, as identified by the writer, Jesse Singal. These boil down to:

Use Trump to draw people in, but don’t make him your lasting focus. Otherwise, your energy and your momentum will evaporate along with him when he goes.

Welcome everyone who wants to protest with youand make them feel welcome.

Don’t be violent.

The mind-blowing bits appear in the section where Singal discusses the second point, about the value of making people feel welcome. He cites the work of sociologist Ziad Munson, who has studied why people join and become increasingly active in causes such as the pro-life movement. Here are the mind-blowing bits, quoted in full (bold is added by OTYCD):

One of the key things he’s found, over and over and over, is that people often get involved in movements without having particularly strong ideological commitments to them.

Take the anti-abortion activists who were the subject of Munson’s book The Making of Pro-life Activists: How Social Mobilization Works. “I went back and I tried to determine what were their beliefs about abortion the first time they were involved in some kind of pro-life activity,” whether a protest in front of a clinic, the March for Life, or whatever else, he explained. “At that moment, only half of them would have considered themselves pro-life.” Moreover, a quarter “would have openly said they were pro-choice.” So why do they get involved? Someone asks them to. In one instance, for example, a woman’s eventually intense, long-term involvement in anti-abortion causes began simply because her doctor, whom she respected a great deal, asked her to come to an event. Prior to that, it just wasn’t something she had thought of.

Why is this mind-blowing? It shows you how much power you have.

Yes, you.

You’re doing so much good work to push back against Trump. You have one more task to add to your To-Do List: Ask someone to join you in pushing back against Trump.

You don’t have to do it thisverysecond. But you should think about who you want to invite, and when, and what you want to invite them to do.

Maybe you ask them to go to a protest with you. Maybe you ask them to go to a League of Women Voters’ meeting with you. Maybe you ask them to phone-bank for a Democratic candidate with you. Maybe you ask them to go to a member of Congress’s next local town hall meeting with you. Maybe you ask them to write and stamp postcards with you.

Whatever works. Whatever makes sense. Just do it.

Then keep doing it. Keep inviting other people–especially those who like you and trust you–to join you in pushing back against Trump.

Keep doing it until Trump is gone and we’ve cleaned up all the wreckage he’ll leave behind.