Community Activism · Health Care · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare

Learn to Use a Tourniquet, and Carry One With You, Just In Case

Learn to use a tourniquet, and carry one with you, just in case.

 

Former Senator and full-time Republican fool Rick Santorum was deservedly smothered under a heap of scorn in March 2018 after suggesting that students should learn cardio-pulminary resuscitation (CPR) in case they found themselves and their friends under attack in a school shooting.

 

Several doctors slammed Santorum for obvious idiocy, but Jo Buyske, executive director of the American Board of Surgery, summed it up best in a tweet that said, “Mr. Santorum, CPR doesn’t work if all the blood is on the ground.”

 

Santorum’s underlying impulse wasn’t wrong. Knowing what to do in a borked situation can help you get through it. He just reached for the wrong solution.

 

The best way to stop all the blood from pooling on the ground is to apply a tourniquet. It’s a temporary solution that stops a victim from bleeding out before medical help can arrive.

 

Granted, a tourniquet can be as useless as CPR when a victim has been shot multiple times by an assailant wielding an AR-15. But someone who’s been wounded in an arm or a leg could live to tell the tale if someone ties on a tourniquet in time.

 

Applying a tourniquet is a skill that needs to be learned. If you don’t know what you’re doing, you can make things worse.

 

First, you need to purchase a tourniquet. The Combat Application Tourniquet (CAT) is well-regarded, as is the SOF Tactical Tourniquet-Wide (SOFTT-W). Both are available through Rescue Essentials.

 

 

The CAT:

https://www.rescue-essentials.com/combat-application-tourniquet-c-a-t-tactical-black-gen-7/

 

 

The SOFTT-W:

https://www.rescue-essentials.com/softt-w-generation-4-tourniquet/

 

 

Then you need to learn how to apply a tourniquet. Here’s a page from the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) website, written by Dr. David R. King, who tended to victims of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing:

https://giving.massgeneral.org/tourniquet-use-instructions/

 

 

You can also review the instructions offered by Stop the Bleeding, a government-sponsored awareness campaign launched in 2015 to encourage everyday people to teach themselves how to handle a bleeding emergency before medical help arrives:

https://www.dhs.gov/stopthebleed

 

 

If you have a bit more to spend, you might consider a Concealed Carry Trauma Kit, which contains a tourniquet as well as a pair of gloves and a hemostatic agent–a substance that stops bleeding. The kit is designed to fit in a back pocket (hence the reference to ‘concealed carry’).

https://www.rescue-essentials.com/concealed-carry-trauma-kit/

 

 

Read about Rick Santorum making a damn fool of himself and getting flayed by doctors who know better:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/morning-mix/wp/2018/03/26/doctors-assure-rick-santorum-learning-cpr-wont-save-mass-shooting-victims/?utm_term=.0e9c26efa749

https://www.thedailybeast.com/doctors-slam-rick-santorum-for-suggesting-kids-learn-cpr-instead-of-protesting

 

 

Also, read an October 2017 WBUR interview with a volunteer from Stop the Bleeding on the power of the tourniquet:

http://www.wbur.org/hereandnow/2017/10/18/tourniquet-blood-loss

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

Action Alerts · Community Activism

Support the Rise Stronger Network

Support Rise Stronger, which is fostering and encouraging a network of politically engaged communities that will hold government accountable at every level.

Rise Stronger was founded in the wake of the 2016 election. It’s a citizen watchdog organization that cultivates grassroots actions and serves as a sort of umbrella for groups, foundations, and other outposts that are devoted to civic engagement and empowering American citizens to speak up and push back.

Among its offerings is a calendar, calls to action, and an interactive directory, dubbed the United States of Resistance, designed to introduce groups to each other and help them gain strength through their numbers.

 

See the Rise Stronger website:

https://www.risestronger.org

 

Find a Rise Stronger chapter near you:

https://www.risestronger.org/state_chapters

 

Sign up for its newsletter:

https://risestronger.org/newsroom/wearetheresistance

 

Become a member of Rise Stronger:

https://www.risestronger.org/sign_up

 

Volunteer with Rise Stronger:

https://risestronger.org/newsroom/join-the-resistance-volunteer-with-rise-stronger

 

Like it on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/RISEStronger.org

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@RISE_Stronger

 

Donate to Rise Stronger:

https://risestronger.org/donate

Community Activism

Set Aside an Afternoon and Plunge Into the Resistance Manual

Set aside an afternoon or so and dig into the Resistance Manual, a Wiki-like project of Stay Woke.

 

We at OTYCD came across the Resistance Manual while hunting for other stuff and boy, this needs a signal boost.

 

The Resistance Manual will eat an afternoon of your time at least, but it’s worth it. It has tons of information that you want and that you didn’t know you wanted.

 

Start with the bar on the left of the home page and see what catches your attention. It can point you to a page of information about what’s going on in your home state, from elections to voting rights to disability rights to climate change to worker’s rights to civil liberties and a heck of a lot more.

 

It will point you to useful info such as the minimum wage in your state, what percentage of state residents are disabled, how much electricity used by your state comes from renewable sources, how many abortion providers your state has, how much your state spends per public school student, and how many homeless people your state has.

 

That’s just one page.

 

The Resistance Manual also devotes whole sections to the Muslim travel ban, Trumpcare/Obamacare, Immigration, Crisis Resources, and upcoming events.

 

 

See the Resistance Manual website:

https://www.resistancemanual.org/Resistance_Manual_Home

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Donate to StayWoke, which built and maintains the Resistance Manual:

https://secure.actblue.com/contribute/page/staywoke-1

 

 

See the StayWoke homepage:

https://www.staywoke.org/about/

Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare

Read The Privilege to Shut Up, An Essay On Whether And When to Talk to Police

Read The Privilege to Shut Up, a powerful essay on whether and when to talk to the police.

Originally published in January 2014 on Popehat, the well-known group blog, and authored by Ken White, it covers the dangers of speaking with the cops, and the reasons why you shouldn’t say much more beyond asking for a lawyer. White advocates for staying mum.

He also acknowledges that you could suffer consequences for exercising your right to stay silent, and he acknowledges that the consequences can be tougher for people who are neither white nor affluent.

This is a strong article on a worthy blog. It’s worth bookmarking.

 

Read The Privilege to Shut Up:

https://www.popehat.com/2014/01/15/the-privilege-to-shut-up/

 

Like Popehat on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/Popehat-99844985854/

 

Follow Popehat on Twitter:

@Popehat

 

Community Activism · Ethics · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare

Read There Is No Good Card For This: What to Say and Do When Life Is Scary, Awful, and Unfair to People You Love

Read There Is No Good Card for This: What to Say and Do When Life is Scary, Awful, and Unfair to People You Love, by Kelsey Crowe and Emily McDowell.

 

TINGCFT might seem like a not-quite-on-topic choice for a political blog, but bear with us. It’s a great textbook on how to have awkward conversations, how to listen, and how not to be a jerk–skills that are ever more precious and valuable in the time of Trump.

 

McDowell is the genius behind a series of greeting cards that you’d actually want to send to someone who’s going through hell but still has a sense of humor. Crowe holds a doctorate in social welfare, and founded Help Each Other Out, which teaches people how to avoid being the person who ghosts or says and does unhelpful things when bad stuff happens to friends and family.

 

The whole book is a gem, but in particular, it goes over how to help people in the grip of illness, fertility issues, divorce, unemployment, and grief.

 

Some general takeaways:

 

It’s better to do something than nothing. Saying ‘I’m sorry’ is doing something.

Remember it’s about them, not you. Don’t make their problem about you.

Listen.

Your kindness is your credential.

The person who needs help may not respond to your overture the way you’d expect. Don’t hold that against them, and don’t let their response deter you from helping others.

 

 

Buy There Is No Good Card for This at great independent book stores such as The Strand or Powell’s:

http://www.strandbooks.com/index.cfm

http://www.powells.com/book/there-is-no-good-card-for-this-9780062469991/1-5

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

Ethics · Fighting Bigotry, Racism, Sexism, Homophobia, Transphobia... · Read, Educate Yourself, Prepare · Save These Tools · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms

Embrace the Awkward: Learn to Handle All Sorts of Unreasonable People

Want to get better at handling uncomfortable conversations with racists, sexists, bigots, and people who don’t share your beliefs and won’t let it go? Read these Captain Awkward blog posts.

 

If you haven’t heard of this blog, you have a treat ahead of you. Plan on losing an afternoon, because you will be diving deep in the rabbit hole.

 

Captain Awkward might be–no, is–the best personal advice column out there. Better than Miss Manners. Better than Dear Abby. Better than Dear Prudence. And yes, better than Carolyn Hax (sorry, Hax).

 

Blog author Jennifer P. has written several entries and presented guest posts on how to handle encounters with sexists, racists, xenophobes, homophobic and transphobic folks, as well as people who make it their mission to stomp on your boundaries.

 

Here are some good ones to start with:

 

#1083 and #1084: Nazis Are Beyond Awkward, Do Not Engage (a woman dating a man who got a Neo-Nazi tattoo way back when and hasn’t yet had it removed; a woman’s older brother is a jerk who says pro-Nazi things and her family is being dense about it):

#1083 and #1084: Nazis Are Beyond Awkward, Do Not Engage.

 

 

#915: ‘All in the Family Politics’ (She is pro-choice and works for an abortion provider; her future mother-in-law is anti-choice):

#915: All In The Family Politics

 

 

#871: ‘Love and Friendship in the Time of Xenophobia’:

#871: Love & Friendship in the Time of Xenophobia

 

 

#819: ‘Ware the ‘Frozen Chosen’ (dealing with less-than-Christian-acting congregants):

#819: ‘Ware The “Frozen Chosen”

 

 

#710: ‘I Love My Volunteers (But Not the Racist Ones)’:

#710: I love my volunteers (but not the racist ones).

 

 

…and read these guest posts:

 

‘A Post-election Guide to Changing Hearts and Minds’:

Guest Post: A post-election guide to changing hearts and minds

 

‘If I Come Out to My Family, Will They Stop Making Offensive Jokes Already?’:

Guest Post! “If I come out to my family, will they stop making offensive jokes already?”

 

Also, on November 16, the Captain Awkward blog posted a link to a great Southern Poverty Law Center guide on responding to everyday bigotry:

https://www.splcenter.org/20150126/speak-responding-everyday-bigotry

 

 

Visit the Captain Awkward site:

https://captainawkward.com

 

Follow Captain Awkward on Twitter:

@CAwkward

 

Donate to Captain Awkward:

Support/Donate