Community Activism · Marches and Protests

Need to Protest? Are Your Feet Itching to March? Check Out Resistance Calendar

Feeling the need to protest? Are your feet itching to march? Just want to know what else is going on? Pull up the Resistance Calendar site and see what’s happening soon near you.

 

The Resistance Calendar lists a wide range of events–not just marches, protests, and rallies.

 

It’ll show you phone-banking events, canvasses, town halls, organization meetings, postcard-writing parties, block walks, interfaith gatherings, brunches, lectures, even bowl-a-thons.

 

It lets you search by date and lets you filter by location from a range of five miles to 500. You can add events as well.

 

It’s so comprehensive that you can look at your own calendar, find the emptier dates, and check Resistance Calendar on those dates to see what it’s got to offer then. Even if you don’t RSVP, you’ll get a good view of what’s happening near you.

 

 

Visit the Resistance Calendar homepage:

http://www.resistancecalendar.org

 

 

Like Resistance Calendar on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/resistancecalendar

Action Alerts · Community Activism · Ethics · Fighting Bigotry, Racism, Sexism, Homophobia, Transphobia... · First Amendment, Defending a Free Press · Health Care · Marches and Protests · Online Privacy, Net Neutrality · Protect the Environment · Public Education · Russian Scandal, Emoluments Clause · Separation of Church and State · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms · Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) · Uncategorized

Attend a #SaveSCOTUS Event Between Monday July 9 and Friday, July 13, 2018

Attend a #SaveSCOTUS event between Monday, July 9, and Friday, July 13, 2018.

 

Team Trump intends to announce the name of its Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) nominee on Monday, July 9, 2018.

 

A team of organizations, headed by the good folks at Indivisible, have planned a week-long series of actions to protest the nominee, who will no doubt be a hard-right extremist.

 

See the website below to find an event near you:

http://savescotus.indivisible.org

 

 

Download the #SaveSCOTUS toolkit, which includes tips on how to plan a local #SaveSCOTUS event:

https://savescotus.indivisible.org/toolkit/

 

 

Visit Indivisible’s main website:

https://www.indivisible.org

 

 

Donate to the Indivisible Project:

https://secure.actblue.com/contribute/page/indivisibleproject?refcode=homepage

 

 

Like the Indivisible Guide on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/indivisibleguide/

 

 

Follow the Indivisible Guide on Twitter:

@IndivisibleTeam

Action Alerts · Common-sense Gun Laws · Marches and Protests · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Support National Die-in Day on June 12, 2018

Support National Die-in Day on Tuesday, June 12, 2018, and attend the event in Washington, D.C., if you can. 

 

National Die-in Day is the brainchild of two young Orlando, Florida natives, Amanda Fugleberg and Frank Kravchuk. It will take place on the second anniversary of the shooting at the Pulse nightclub, which killed 49.

 

As of late May, the event is planned for Washington, D.C., with no satellite events announced. It will take place in front of the Capitol building and will begin with a rally for gun reform at 10:30 am and culminate in a 12-minute die-in at noon. The timespan was chosen because it lasts 700 seconds, which represents how many have died in mass shootings since the attack at Pulse.

 

 

In addition to joining the event and boosting the #NationalDieInDay hashtag, you can donate to a GoFundMe set up for the event:

https://www.gofundme.com/nationaldiein?member=215408

 

 

You can also like the National Die-in Day Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/National-Die-In-Day-1798187990238689/

 

 

And you can follow it on Twitter:

@NationalDieIn

 

 

Read about plans for the June 12 National Die-in:

https://www.advocate.com/crime/2018/5/26/two-years-after-pulse-massacre-national-die-planned-dc

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/may/21/us-gun-control-protest-high-school-die-in-day

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the button on the upper right of the page. And tell your friends about the blog!

Common-sense Gun Laws · Community Activism · Marches and Protests · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Wear Orange On June 1 For National Gun Violence Awareness Day

Plan to wear orange on Friday, June 1, to support National Gun Violence Awareness Day, and see if there’s a Wear Orange Weekend event near you.

 

The Wear Orange movement is an effort championed by Everytown for Gun Safety, but not started by it. The movement began with those who mourned the death of 15-year-old Hadiya Pendleton, who was killed in Chicago in 2013 one week after she participated in President Obama’s second inaugural parade. They donned orange in her honor, and orange became the color of the anti-gun violence movement.

 

Several #WearOrange events have been planned across the country between June 1 to June 3 to raise awareness about gun violence and demand a safer world. They include parades, barbecues, rallies, marches, and more.

 

To find an event near you, enter your zip code into the search engine at this link:

http://act.everytown.org/event/wear-orange-2018/search/?source=emne_WearOrange&utm_source=em_n_&utm_medium=_e&utm_campaign=WearOrange

 

Another way to show support is to take a photo of yourself wearing orange on June 1 and  add it to the gallery here:

https://wearorange.org/wear-orange/

 

 

If you haven’t got anything orange to wear and wish to stock up, you can visit the Wear Orange shop, which has buttons, t-shirts, pins, ribbons, ball caps, and more (note that more than one vendor is reflected here, and the billing process might reflect that):

https://wearorange.org/shop/

 

And of course you can follow the #WearOrange hashtag on social media.

 

 

See the Wear Orange homepage:

https://wearorange.org

 

 

See the Wear Orange About page:

https://wearorange.org/about/

 

 

View the Wear Orange photo gallery:

https://wearorange.org/gallery/?source=emne_WearOrange&utm_source=em_n_&utm_medium=_e&utm_campaign=WearOrange

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

Community Activism · Marches and Protests

Support the 22nd Annual Mother’s Day Walk for Peace in Boston

Join or support the 22nd annual Mother’s Day Walk for Peace in Dorchester, a neighborhood of Boston. It takes place on Sunday, May 13, 2018. 

 

The walk is a fundraiser for the Louis D. Brown Peace Institute, which was established after the death of Brown, a 15-year-old who was killed in 1993 by a stray bullet from a gang shootout. The walk began in 1996 as a way to honor the family and friends of children lost to murder.

 

The walk is a local event that takes place in Dorchester, which is a neighborhood of Boston. It does not have sister or satellite marches. Its organizers hope to raise about $400,000 for the institute, which serves families that have been affected by murder and works to change society so it treats the families of murder victims with greater dignity and compassion.

 

In addition to registering to join the walk and sponsoring walkers, you can boost the event on social media through the #mothersdaywalk4peace hashtag.

 

 

Learn where the walk starts in Dorchester and see the walking route:

https://www.mothersdaywalk4peace.org/about-hayden/

 

 

 

Donate to the walk:

https://www.mothersdaywalk4peace.org/donate/

 

 

Register to walk (cost is $10 per walker):

https://www.mothersdaywalk4peace.org/register

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

See the FAQ for the event:

https://www.mothersdaywalk4peace.org/faq

 

 

See the website for the Louis D. Brown Peace Institute:

http://www.ldbpeaceinstitute.org

 

 

About Louis D. Brown:

http://www.ldbpeaceinstitute.org/content/our-story

 

 

Learn about the mission of the Louis D. Brown Peace Institute, the beneficiary of the walk:

http://www.ldbpeaceinstitute.org/content/our-mission

 

 

Like the Louis D. Brown Peace Institute on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/ldbpeaceinstitute/?ref=br_rs

 

 

Follow the institute on Twitter:

@LDBpeaceinst

 

 

Community Activism · Marches and Protests · Stand Up for Civilization · Stand Up for Norms · Use Your Power, Recruit Friends

Support the New Poor People’s Campaign, Which Furthers the Work of Martin Luther King Jr.

Support the revived Poor People’s Campaign, which will carry on the work that Martin Luther King Jr. was advocating in the months and years before his 1968 assassination.

 

Led by Rev. Dr William Barber II, creator of the Moral Mondays movement in North Carolina, the new Poor People’s Campaign will commemorate the 50th anniversary of the original by updating and carrying on its efforts to improve the lives of the poor on many fronts–fighting racism, improving access to jobs, health care, and housing, and more. It will also take aim at cultural tropes that blame the poor for their poverty.

 

The new Poor People’s Campaign, a nonpartisan, peaceful movement, will begin on Mother’s Day–Sunday May 13, 2018–with events in at least 25 states as well as Washington, D.C.

 

For each of six weeks, the campaign will highlight a different injustice, starting with child poverty. The program will culminate in a mobilization at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, D.C. on June 21, but it will represent the first major event in the revived campaign.

 

 

See the Poor People’s Campaign website:

https://poorpeoplescampaign.org

 

 

Read about its Fundamental Principles:

https://poorpeoplescampaign.org/index.php/fundamental-principles/

 

 

Learn about Dr. King’s vision for the original Poor People’s Campaign of the late 1960s:

https://poorpeoplescampaign.org/index.php/poor-peoples-campaign-1968/

 

 

Donate to the Poor People’s Campaign:

https://poorpeoplescampaign.org/index.php/donate/

 

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!

 

 

Like the Poor People’s Campaign on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/anewppc/

 

 

Follow it on Twitter:

@UniteThePoor

 

 

Read a story from The Root on the new Poor People’s Campaign:

https://www.theroot.com/moral-revival-of-america-modern-day-poor-people-s-ca-1821032951?utm_source=theroot_facebook&utm_medium=socialflow

 

 

Read another article from The Root on Barber leaving the presidency of the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP to lead the new Poor People’s Campaign:

https://www.theroot.com/rev-william-barber-ii-legendary-civil-rights-leader-1795137036

 

Marches and Protests

Honor Those Who You Carry With You When You March

Honor those who you represent when you march or protest.

 

When you go to a march or a protest, it’s not just about you. You stand for many other people who want to be there, but can’t.

 

Maybe they’re working. Maybe they’re care-giving. Maybe they’re cramming for finals. Maybe they’re traveling. Maybe they’re too sick to go. Maybe they live too far away to make the trip. Maybe they can’t afford it and would be insulted if you tried to pay their way. Maybe they’re dead, but would go without hesitation if they were alive to join you.

 

Find a way to bring these people with you even though they can’t come in person.

The cheapest and easiest way is to write their names on a piece of paper and tuck it in your pocket.

 

Sit and think. Who would want to come with you? Your mother. Your great-grandfather. Your cousin. Your favorite teacher. Your sorority sister. Write their names. That can be enough.

 

You could also build a charm bracelet or a necklace, with each charm representing a person who you’re “bringing” to the event.

 

Jewelry isn’t as cheap as pen and paper, but it can be pretty cheap (see the link below).

http://www.fitnessfinders.net/school-awards-and-tokens-s/147.htm

 

And when you do this, find a way to carry the memory of Heather Heyer with you. She was killed in Charlottesville, Virginia on August 12, 2017 when a 20-year-old man deliberately drove his car into a group of anti-racist protesters.

 

Heyer’s favorite color was purple. If you have purple clothing, you could wear that to remember her and carry her with you. Or maybe you could carry or wear a violet–she named her dog Violet.

 

Never lose sight of the fact that when you lace up your marching shoes and ready your signs, you are not alone, at least not in spirit. Draw strength from those who you carry with you.

 

Subscribe to One Thing You Can Do by clicking the blue button on the upper right or checking the About & Subscribe page. And tell your friends about the blog!